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1 SURVIIVOR S GUIIDE v1..5 Danny Millard (order # ) 22 Exodus, OPS, and the GCG logo are trademarks of Glutton Creeper G...

S SU UR RV VIIV VO OR R’’S SG GU UIID DE E vv11..55

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Exodus, OPS®, and the GCG logo are trademarks of Glutton Creeper Games. Exodus Survivor Guide v1.5 (PDF) is copyright Glutton Creeper Games ©2007–2009 and is e-commerce and may not be redistributed after purchase without written consent from Glutton Creeper Games. Persons distributing this file without permission of Glutton Creeper Games are subject to Copyright and Piracy laws and may be prosecuted to the fullest extent of these laws.

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Project Developer: Designers:

Glutton Creeper Games

Cary Martin (Equipment) Jason Mical (Character Design and additional Rule Design) Grzegorz Ocetek (Feats and Skills) John Wyatt (Additional Character Design, Introduction, Revisions, and Rule Design)

Editor: Content Reviewers:

Print Layout:

Nikolai Kassatkin

Jason Sanford, Scott Reid, and Wayne Ward

John Wyatt

Cover Artist: Samuel Santos

Interior Artist: David Cummings, Derek Hand, Rick Hershey, Craig Petersen, Michael Syrigos, Kurt Taylor and Aleksander Vjestica.

Play Testers: J. Ian Abbott, Brian Arden, Joseph Altmaier, Kevin Barbour, Laurie Bernier, Sam Bernier, David Brewer, Ben Caplan, Cody Choate, Stephen Dalnodar, Erin Dawson, Gintas Degutis, Andrew Gillis, Gediminas Jonaitis, Scott Kunian, Carmen Leary, Mark Leary, Rodney Leary, Stacy Leary, Anthony Lesink, Bennett Lawrence, Tony Mambuca, Bill Natola, Mike Pescuma, Tom Oliveri, Michael Olivotto, Gediminas Radikas, Slade Stolar, Jonas Tamaliunas, Walter Keenlyside, Tarik Salameh, Valius Vaitkus, Dan Weiner, Joseph Weiss, and Greg Wood.

Open Content Declaration: All d20 game mechanics presented in this book are Open Gaming Content (OGC). Descriptive text referring to the Exodus World (to include Exodus, Children of the Apocalypse, Ghūls, NEMO, Savior’s Army, Steel Disciples, Techo-Reapers, Trans-Genetic Mutants, Tribal Nation, and Unity), characters, proper names, and pictures (including maps) are product identity and may not be reproduced without written consent of Glutton Creeper Games. Introduction: This chapter is product identity and is closed content. Chapter 1: This chapter is open content except for descriptive text of the three races and to other references of product identity as detailed above. Chapter 2 & 3: All Skills and Feats listed are open content. Chapter 4: All equipment is open content. Chapter 5: All combat rules are open content. Chapter 6: All Advanced Classes are open content except for the descriptive text of each class. Chapter 7: This chapter is product identity and is closed content.

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Contents Introduction: The Basics of d20 Chapter I: Character Creation Section 1: Races Section 2: Backgrounds Section 3: Character Classes Section 4: Traits Section 5: Occupations Section 6: Talent Trees Section 7: Vital Statistics Chapter II: Skills Chapter III: Feats Chapter IV: Equipment Chapter V: Combat Chapter VI: Advanced Classes Chapter VII: Exodus Primer Appendix A: Custom Class Appendix B: Exodus Historic Appendix C: Jinxed Table Appendix D: Wasteland Advertisem*nts Character Sheet Index Open Gaming License

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Introduction

Introduction It is Man’s nature to destroy, whether it is eradicating an animal species, cutting down the rainforest, or killing his fellow man, one thing remains: War never changes. On December 21, 2012, the end came to Man as the War on Terror escalated to nuclear proportions and left the planet in ash. This date was foreseen in doomsday prophecies ranging from the Mayans to Revelations of the New Testament. Taking a look back to what led up to the Exodus of man from the technical age of the 21st century, it is apparent that it all began in 1938. In the year 1938, the Nazis were rumored to be developing an atomic bomb. The United States initiated its own program under the Army Corps of Engineers in June 1942. America needed to build the atomic weapon before Germany or Japan did—thus sparked the Manhattan Project. In 1945, with the Atomic Bomb created, the United Stated shifted the focus of the Manhattan Project to combat the rumored Nazis “Super Soldier” program. The facilities that were used to create the nuclear bombs now used those techniques to attempt to create the prefect combat soldier.

The Race for the Atomic Bomb Begins 19391941 World War II started September 1, 1939, when Germany attacked Poland. By 1941, the Germans were leading the race for the atomic bomb. They had a heavy-water plant, highgrade uranium compounds, a nearly complete cyclotron, capable scientists and engineers, and the greatest chemical engineering industry in the world. The Atomic Bomb 1941 -1945 Through internal struggles and scientific errors by the Germans, this allowed the United States to develop the first controlled nuclear reaction in a University of Chicago reaction in 1942. In July, 1945 the United States tested the first atomic bomb at the Trinity test facility near Alamogordo, New Mexico. Two months later, Japan was bombed with the Little Boy and Fat Man atomic bombs.

With the end of World War II in May 1945, several European nations were displaced and contained nuclear armaments left over from the war. In 1947 this started the long threat of war known as the Cold War that would last until the 1990’s when the Soviet Union dissolved. With this looming threat, the United States continued the Manhattan “Super Soldier” Project and proceeded to start a failsafe project titled the “Freehold Project.” The Freehold Project started in 1950, and was designed to house the military generals and staff, engineers, and scientists. To fund the program, however, wealthy investors were able to buy housing in these massive fallout shelters for their immediate family. After several attempts to make the Super Soldier, the Manhattan project was discontinued in the 1990’s when the Cold War ended. By chance, the program resumed a decade later in 2002, when the human genome was decoded, through careful genetic engineering of young orphans in stasis chambers. The first of these soldiers, dubbed “Trans-Genetic” (later “Trans-Genetic Mutants”) emerged from stasis in their young teen-age years in the same year of the Exodus and began strict military training. In 2001, war revisited the United States, when suicide bombers hijacked planes, and crashed them into major United States Military facilities and the World Trade Center. The president of the United States condemned the Middle Eastern countries and the War on Terror began. Within the next decade the United States Military, with allied countries, entered into military engagements in the Middle East.

In 2010, several Eastern countries began to feel threatened by the military and technological might of

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the United States, and began to devise countermeasures against invasion. The first country to resist the United States ban on Nuclear weapons was North Korea, shortly to be followed by China. Within the course of two years, the world had seen another World War begin, but this would be the last global war, as it would be known as the Exodus. On December 21, 2012, a Mayan prophecy came to light as the world axis shifted from the force of nuclear devastation. On December 12, China and North Korea launched nuclear weapons into space to destroy United States and allied forces satellites and proceed to occupy Japan and South Korea. The Russian Federation proceeded to enter into ground conflict with China. Middle-Eastern countries that were targets in the War of Terror retaliated against allied countries with weapons of mass destruction. Eleven days later nuclear weapons were fired on a mass scale from Iran, targeting England, France, Japan, and the Eastern United States. China and Korea proceeded to launch nuclear weapons on Russia, the Northern European countries, Australia, and the Western United States. With limited satellite targeting, the United States fired a large amount of nuclear weapons targeting the Middle-East and China, however some of the targeting systems malfunctioned causing the nukes to detonate in Europe. The sky darkened and sirens sounded as the children of god fled into underground shelters, built by man as an escape, an Exodus, from his own destruction decades ago. Twenty years later, when the shelters opened the survivors resurfaced to find a new world: One of desolation, one of survival, one with the same goals as the old world for . . . War never changes . . .

And the Angels Sounded And hail and fire followed, mingled with blood, and they were thrown to the earth. And a third of the trees were burned up, and all green grass was burned up. And something like a great mountain burning with fire was thrown into the sea, and a third of the sea became blood. And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter. And a third of the sun was struck, a third of the moon, and a third of the stars, so that a third of them were darkened. A third of the day did not shine, and likewise the night. — Revelations

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D20 Basics

d20 Basics DICE NOTATION

These rules use the following die notations: d4 = four-sided die d6 = six-sided die d8 = eight-sided die d10 = ten-sided die d12 = twelve-sided die d20 = twenty-sided die d% = percentile dice (A number between 1 and 100 is generated by rolling two different ten-sided dice. One die (designated before rolling) is the tens digit. The other die is the ones digit. Two 0s represent 100.) Die rolls are expressed in the format: [#] die type [+/- modifiers] Example: 3d6+2 means: "Roll 3 six-sided dice. Add the result of the three dice together. Add 2."

ROUNDING FRACTIONS

In general, if you wind up with a fraction, round down, even if the fraction is one-

half or larger. Exception: Certain rolls, such as damage and hit points, have a minimum of 1.

MULTIPLYING Sometimes a special rule makes you multiply a number or a die roll. As long as you are applying a single multiplier, multiply the number normally. When two or more multipliers apply, however, combine them into a single multiple; each extra multiple adding 1 less than its value to the first multiple. Thus, a double (x2) and a double (x2) applied to the same number results in a triple (x3, because 2 + 1 = 3).

BASIC TASK RESOLUTION SYSTEM These rules assume a standardized system for determining the success or failure of any given task. That system is: d20 + Modifiers vs. Target Number. The Modifiers and Target Number are determined by the type of task. If the result of the d20 roll + the Modifiers equals or exceeds the Target Number, the test is successful. Any other result is a failure.

Ability

Scores

Every character has six basic Ability Scores: Strength (STR) Dexterity (DEX) Intelligence (INT) Wisdom (WIS)

Constitution (CON) Charisma (CHA)

The Score of these Abilities ranges from 0 to infinity. A limit, if any, will be specified in the rules. The normal human range is 3 to 18. It is possible for a creature to have a score of "none." A score of "none" is not the same as a score of "0." A score of "none" means that the creature does not possess the ability at all. The modifier for a score of "none" is +0. A character with a CON of 0 is dead. A 0 in any other score means the character is helpless and cannot move. Keeping track of negative Ability Score points is never necessary. A character’s Ability Score cannot drop below 0.

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Strength This is how strong you are. Strength determines your attack accuracy in grapples, melee, and unarmed combat, and it determines the amount of bonus damage you deal with a successful melee or unarmed strike. Strength also determines your load capacity, the amount of weight you can carry with you before becoming encumbered. Any creature that can physically manipulate other objects has at least 1 point of Strength. A creature with no Strength score cannot exert force, usually because it has no physical body or because it does not move. The creature automatically fails Strength checks. If the creature can attack, it applies its Dexterity modifier to its base attack instead of a Strength modifier.

Dexterity This is how agile and quick you are. Dexterity determines your attack accuracy in ranged combat. Dexterity also determines your natural defense through quickness and dodging blast-effect attacks.

Ability Score Score

Modifier

0*

Score 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Modifier +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10

1 –5 2 –5 3 –4 4 –3 5 –3 6 –2 7 –2 8 –1 9 –1 10 0 11 0 12 +1 13 +1 14 +2 * If any Ability Score except Constitution reaches 0, the

character is incapacitated, unconscious, and considered Any creature that can move has at least 1 point of Dexterity. A helpless. If the character’s Constitution score reaches 0, creature with no Dexterity score cannot move. If it can act, it the character is dead. applies its Intelligence modifier to initiative checks instead of a Dexterity modifier. The creature fails all Reflex saves and Dexterity checks.

Constitution This is your health and stamina. Constitution determines whether you have better or poorer health and the threshold of pain that you can endure. Constitution affects your survival chances against chemical use, wasteland diseases, and poisons. If a character's Constitution changes enough to alter his Constitution modifier, his hit points also increase or decrease accordingly at the same time. Any living creature has at least 1 point of Constitution. A creature with no Constitution (such as an automaton) has no “physical” body or metabolism. It is immune to any effect that requires a Fortitude save unless the effect works on objects. The creature is also immune to ability damage, ability drain and massive damage. Such a creature will always fail Constitution checks.

Intelligence This is how big your brain is and measures your level of smarts. Intelligence determines the bonus amount of skill points (if any) earned at each level of advancement. Any creature that can think, learn, or remember has at least 1 point of Intelligence. A creature with no Intelligence score is an automaton, operating on simple instincts or programmed instructions. It is immune to all mind-influencing effects (charms, compulsions and morale effects) and automatically fails Intelligence checks.

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Wisdom This is your perception and reasoning, the sense of knowing right from wrong and common sense. Wisdom determines your power of deduction and overall willpower against charms and chemical withdrawal. Any creature that can perceive its environment in any fashion has at least 1 point of Wisdom. Anything with no Wisdom score is an object, not a creature. Anything without a Wisdom score also has no Charisma score, and vice versa.

Charisma This is your attitude and charm. Charisma determines your appearance (inside and outside), likeability to others, and your influence over them. Any creature capable of telling the difference between itself and other things has at least 1 point of Charisma.

Ability Modifiers Each ability will have a modifier. The modifier can be calculated using this formula: (ability/2) -5 [round result down] The modifier is the number you add to or subtract from the die roll when your character tries to do something related to that ability. A positive modifier is called a bonus, and a negative modifier is called a penalty.

Changing Ability Scores

Ability scores can increase with no limit.

Poisons, diseases, and other effects can cause temporary ability damage. Ability points lost to damage return naturally—typically at a rate of 1 point per day for each affected ability. As a character ages, some ability scores go up and others go down (see section 7 below). When an ability score changes, the modifier associated with that score also changes. A "natural 20" on the die roll is not an automatic success. A "natural 1" on the die roll is not an automatic failure, unless the rules state otherwise.

Ability Score Generation Ability Score generation varies by the selected method, as presented below. An Overseer will approve the best method of generation for his Exodus campaign. Method 1: Classic RPG The Classic method of generating Ability Scores in an OGL setting is by rolling 3d6 and adding the total result to a score of the player’s choice. Continue to roll 3d6 until each of the 6 Ability Score is assigned a number. Add any modifiers to the Ability Scores from Race or Traits after all Scores are placed. Method 2: Classic Plus The Classic Plus method of generating Ability Scores mimics the Classic method by rolling 3d6 and adding the total result to a score of the player’s choice. Continue to roll 3d6 until each of the 6 Ability Scores is assigned a number. Then, take one of the Ability Scores (usually the lowest) and re-roll the result, taking either the new or the old result. Add any modifiers to the Ability Scores from Race or Traits after all Scores are placed.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Method 3: Power Classic The Power Classic method of generating Ability Scores mimics the Classic method also; however, the player rolls 4d6 taking the best 3 dice and assigning the total result to a score of the player’s choice. Continue to roll 4d6, taking the best 3 dice, until each of the 6 Ability Scores is assigned a number. Add any modifiers to the Ability Scores from Race or Traits after all Scores are placed. Method 4: Point-Buy The Point-Buy method of generating Ability Scores allows the player to pick his Ability Scores based on a set number of points on the adjoining sidebar. Each of the character’s Ability Scores starts at a base of 8 and can be adjusted up or down using the point-buy method to spend or gain points. Exodus uses a base of 28 points for player characters to buy Ability Scores, but this number can be adjusted by the Overseer to make less (25 points) or more (32 points) powerful characters. Add any modifiers to the Ability Scores from Race or Traits after all Ability Scores are placed. No Ability Score can be less than 4 after modifiers are added. If a modifier results in a score of less than 4, the player must buy up the score before the modifier is added to generate at least a final score of 4 in that Ability.

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Point Cost –4 –2 –1 0 1 2 3 4

Ability Score 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Point Cost 5 6 8 10 13 16 20 24

Ability Score 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

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Character Creation

Chapter I Character Creation

This chapter details the process necessary to design a character suitable for use in the Exodus setting or a similar post-apocalyptic setting. Characters are created as detailed below. There are eight divisions within the chapter that should be followed in the order presented, each division providing several options for customization that result in a unique end-character.

First a player must choose a Race for his character. Most inhabitants of the Wasteland are Humans, but government experimentation has resulted in two human mutated races known as the Ghūl (the living dead) and the government created Trans-Genetic Mutant. After the player selects his race, he then determines his ability scores as detailed under Ability Score Generation in the previous section under d20 Basics. Next the player chooses a Background for his character. Backgrounds represent the faction that a character belongs to; or, has been brought up in and can influence Bonus Feats, Class Skills, and Special Abilities. After choosing his Background the player decides his class options presented in section 3 of this chapter. Once the character's Class has been determined the player is free to choose Traits to further enhance his character. Traits provide a positive benefit, but each trait has a drawback to it as well. Players can choose to take zero, one, or two Traits. Next has the player must choose an Occupation for his character. Occupations are similar to Backgrounds in that they influence Bonus Class Skills and may provide Bonus Feats. They represent what a character did before he started adventuring and between adventures. Occupations also determine starting wealth. Step six is to choose the character's first level Talent; Tag Skills; distribute skill points; and starting Feats as detailed in Chapter 3. Finally, finishing details of the character can be recorded. Karma Points are now determined. At this point, all that remains is to choose: equipment, calculate hit point totals and final saving throws, and prepare a physical Description and background for the character.

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Section 1: Races Humans Humans are the primary race found in the Wasteland. There are many different kinds of humans ranging from pasty-skinned Shelter Dwellers who have not seen natural light for generations, to hardy mountain tribes who have developed an entirely new culture. Humans have little in common ideologically and there is no one root for all human cultures since each spawned from a separate groups of survivors.

Physical Stats Gender Male Female Male Female

Base Height Height Modifier 60 in. +2d10 in. 55 in. +2d10 in. Average Height 71 in. (5’ 11”) 66 in. (5’ 6”)

Base Weight Weight Modifier 120 lb. x2d4 lb. 85 lb. x2d4 lb. Average Weight 175 lb. 140 lb.

The most common human lifestyle is to live in a small wasteland community. They squat in the ruins of civilization, living in houses and still-serviceable buildings, and may have luxuries such as flush toilets and electricity. Knowledge of the old world beyond what is immediately applicable, however, is something spoken of from memories—and these slowly eroding into myth. In game terms humans are identical to humans in the real world. They are neither particularly immune to the effects of radiation, nor especially concerned with it unless they take a stroll through a highly irradiated area. They have some technical know-how but the high points of science, such as power armor and energy weapons, are usually beyond their comprehension. Firearms are commonplace, as are fisticuffs and melee weapons.

Human Nature

Humans of the Wastelands are not a trusting lot when it comes to outsiders and others sentient beings of the waste. Humans view other humans depending on their community; Shelter Dwellers, for example, are xenophobic of Wasteland humans, believing they have contagious diseases and are overly violent. Most humans can coexist with others human once trust is established. Other sentient beings of the waste are view with blatant racism by humans. They generally view Ghūls with disdain and most will shoot a Ghūl on sight, since they look like walking corpses. A few communities have taken pity on these radiated souls, however, and allow them to live on the outskirts of society. They are tolerated for their knowledge of pre-war history and technology and ability to repair items. Trans-Genetic Mutants, though, are viewed as a dangerous threat to humanity by most, as they seek to evolve the human race into monstrosities. The Trans-Genetic Mutants must be destroyed to preserve human existence. In a few cases Wasteland towns and caravans have adopted a few defector Trans-Genetic Mutants as military measures against raiders and the Trans-Genetic Mutant army.

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Section 1: Races

Ghuls

Although they look like a walking corpse, Ghūls are in fact otherwise normal humans who have been Physical Stats Gender Base Height Base Weight exposed to massive amounts of radiation during Height Modifier Weight Modifier the Great War or from the United States Male 60 in. +2d10 in. 100 lb. x2d4 lb. government as part of the “Trans-Genetic Warrior Female 55 in. +2d10 in. 65 lb. x2d4 lb. Project (failed experiments)” and survived against Average Height Average Weight all odds. The name Ghūl was first termed in the Male 71 in. (5’ 11”) 155 lb. Wasteland by an Arabic merchant that ran across Female 66 in. (5’ 6”) 110 lb. these poor unfortunate souls near Berkeley, stating that he seen desert demons in man-form devouring rotted corpses to other merchants and travelers of the wastelands. Several other witnesses have confirmed the rumors and stories and the name stuck and filled many communities with fear of these desert monsters. The Chi of San Francisco, however, term Ghūls as the Jiang Shi or walking corpse. Ghūls are the same size as normal humans, but have pale, discolored skin that hangs raggedly off their bodies. What little hair they have left is wiry and wild. Despite their physical deformities, Ghūls’ minds are intact. Most human communities do not tolerate Ghūls, and their terrifying appearance has led many to simply shoot them on sight. This has led them to create communities of their own when possible. One of the largest Ghūl populations is located in the defunct once secret military base in Berkeley, California where military personnel and scientists where eradicated by nuclear fallout and the uprising of the Ghūls. The radiation that has deformed Ghūls has also prolonged their lives–in fact, they are almost all survivors from before the War. Most Ghūls know how technology works and make excellent scientists and mechanics. While there are many opportunities open to wanderers with those skills, many Ghūls do not feel the need to wander the Wastes and instead remain content to live out their days in the communities they have carved. Most Ghūls regard normal humans, which they often refer to as “smooth skins,” with suspicion if not outright hostility. They tend to be very pragmatic, having witnessed the destruction of civilization once before, and observe the rise and fall of power groups attempting to take its place from a distance.

Traits Size: Medium Ability Modifiers +2 Wisdom, –2 Strength, –2 Dexterity

Base Speed

Due to their weakened bodies Ghūls have a base speed of 20 feet.

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Saving Throw Bonuses

Ghūls are particularly hardy and receive a natural +2 racial bonus to all Fortitude saves. Because of their great age they also gain a +2 racial bonus to their Will saves.

Skill Bonus

Ghūls gain one of the following skills as a bonus class skill: Computer Use, Craft (Electronic, Mechanical, or Structural), Knowledge (Engineering, History, or Technology), or Repair.

Immune to Radiation

Ghūls are immune to the effects of radiation and radiation sickness.

Timeless

Due to the massive dose of radiation they received, the average lifespan of a Ghūl is extended to 300 years. However, Ghūls acquire Feats at a slower rate than other races. Acquired Feats are gained at 4 th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th levels. Additionally, Ghūls are sterile and cannot reproduce.

Feats Ghūls receive two Feats at first level (one to start with and one for first level), since at one time in their lives they were human.

Human Nature Ghūls attempt to remain in human society, or at least, on the outskirts of human settlements in the Wastelands. They are seen as horrors, however, and are feared in general by humans. This makes their survival a difficult task. Ghūls just seek to live in peaceful, small communities on the outskirts of towns, staying out of most of the affairs of humans. Ghūls in general are not hostile to humans, unless humans come a gunning for them. Trans-Genetic Mutants, however, are a dangerous threat to Ghūls, as the mutants seek to either eradicate them or make them slaves. It is a rare case to see a Ghūl and a Trans-Genetic Mutant working together.

Trans-Genetic Mutants During the Manhattan Project in the 1940, the United States Government started the TransGenetic Warrior Project in Berkeley California using radiation to create a super soldier to combat the Nazi’s super soldier program. The Trans-Genetic Warrior project produced many failed experiments (the most common being the Ghūls) until the turn of the century, when the human genome was decoded. The Trans-Genetic Warrior Project was moved to Los Alamos, New Mexico in 2002 where radiation was used to mutate orphaned infants physical genomes in stasis chambers until reaching young adulthood upon where they were processed into a special military training force that trained them to be killing machines. Tran-Genetic Mutants stand over 3 meters tall, and have green, grey or yellowish skin (or a mixture of all three) with a dried out texture. They resemble normal humans in anatomy, but are far stronger and are nearly immune to radiation and disease. Unfortunately, one of the secondary effects of being in a stasis chamber for 10 to 15 years is diminished mental attributes. Physical Stats Gender Male Female Male Female

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Base Height Height Modifier 76 in. +2d4 in. 72 in. +2d4 in. Average Height 81 in. (6’ 9”) 77 in. (6’ 5”)

Base Weight Weight Modifier 160 lb. x2d10 lb. 125 lb. x2d10 lb. Average Weight 215 lb. 170 lb.

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Section 1: Races Traits Size: Medium Ability Modifiers +4 Strength, +2 Constitution, –2 Intelligence, –2 Wisdom, and –2 Charisma.

Base Speed 30 feet

Resistances

Trans-Genetic Mutants receive a +4 racial bonus to Fortitude saving throws against disease and radiation effects. Additionally, Trans-Genetic Mutants are immune to the effects of Radiation Sickness caused by Low or lesser forms of Radioactive Exposure.

Combat Bonuses Trans-Genetic Mutants are restricted to use of large-sized firearms and medium-sized or larger melee weapons due to the size of their mitts. Firearms and melee weapons outside of their size range can be used, but at a penalty of a –4 to attack rolls. Additionally, Trans-Genetic Mutants cannot wear any armor unless it is specially sized for them because of their broad frame and dense skin. Their skin, however, is very thick, granting them 3 points of physical damage reduction (PDR 3).

Powerful Build: The physical stature of Trans-Genetic Mutants allows them to function in many ways as if they were one sizecategory larger.

Whenever a Trans-Genetic Mutant is subject to a size modifier, or special size modifier for an opposed check (+4 to Grapple checks, and +4 to resist Bull Rush and Trip attempts), the Trans-Genetic Mutant is treated, as one size larger if doing so is advantageous to him. A Trans-Genetic Mutant is also considered to be one size larger when determining whether a creature’s special attacks based on size (such as improved grab or swallow whole) can affect him. A Trans-Genetic Mutant can use weapons designed for a creature one size larger without penalty. His space and reach, however, remain those of a creature of his actual size.

Feats Trans-Genetic Mutants receive two Feats at first level (one to start with and one for first level), since at one time in their lives they were human. One of these feats must be of a military nature, from the list below: Alertness, Athletic, Blind-Fight, Brawl, Combat Reflexes, Defensive Martial Arts, Dodge, Endurance, Quick Recovery, Run, Strong Back, Stonewall, or Toughness.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Human Nature

Since the fall of the US Government, the Trans-Genetic Warriors is a major opposition in the wasteland and are the evolution of the Wasteland. Trans-Genetic Mutants view wasteland humans as imperfections that caused the cataclysm of 2012, and are nothing better than a tool in which to harvest more recruits to boaster their ranks. Ghūls are the remains of failed experiments and are nothing more than a source of knowledge to aid in the growth of the Alpha race. Most Ghūls are either casualties of war or turned into slaves and forced into work camps in the service of the Trans-Genetic Mutants.

Section 2: Backgrounds Backgrounds represent the wide variety of societal influences a character might have encountered in his upbringing. While an Occupation is what the character does for a living, a Background is the way the character was raised or the experiences the character has had that served as the primary development factor for the character. All characters must start with a Background and may only have one background. If your character were a Survivalist Tribal you would have to decide which one of those Backgrounds most influenced your character’s development and select it; the other Background option would represent a role-playing opportunity. Unless indicated by a racial prerequisite (such as Ghūl only or Trans-Genetic Mutant only), all backgrounds are available to all three races.

Chi Descendant You are the descendant of the Chi (short for Chinese or Chinaman) from Chinatown in San Francisco, California. A Chinese prophet foresaw the Great War and led a large group of 300 Chinese into an underground fallout shelter beneath Chinatown, hours before the sky dragon blew fire upon the earth. After twenty years of isolation in the shelter, the Chi and their offspring returned to San Francisco and began to rebuild their civilization in the ruins. The Chi now number nearly a thousand and have set up a feudalistic government centered in the ruins of Chinatown and spread out into San Francisco and the surrounding lands.

City Slicker Traits City Slickers are proficient with Simple Weapons and Personal Firearms. City Slickers may choose one Knowledge skill as an additional class skill. Bonus Class Skills: Barter, Craft (any), Gather Information, Knowledge (civics and street), Perform (any), and Profession (any).

Chi Traits Race Requirement: Human Chi are proficient with Simple Weapons and light armors. Bonus Feat: Chi characters are expert in hand to hand combat or defense and gain one of the following feats for at character creation for free: Acrobatic, Blind-fight, Brawl, Defensive Martial Arts, or Dodge. Bonus Class Skills: Balance, Barter, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, and Tumble.

City Slicker You’re as cosmopolitan as they come in the Wastelands. You’ve lived most, if not all, of your life in a large city and for your troubles you enjoyed decent medical and dental care, the benefits of technology, like air conditioning and electricity, and might have even attended an organized school with classes taught by professional educators.

There are a fair number of large cities in the Wasteland especially as more and more settlements take tentative steps back towards becoming a civilization. Cities have technology above and beyond the rest of the Wastes

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Section 2: Backgrounds although they bring their own problems as well such as organized crime and drugs. City Slickers tend to be proud of their status and the privileges it has afforded them; and, although this pride can lead them to mistrust or hatred of outsiders, it could just as easily result in a mission to help those far less fortunate then themselves.

Cultist You are or were a member of one of the many religious cults that have sprung up after the Great War whether you were born into it or inducted at a later date. Being a member has had certain benefits and it has certainly gives you a unique insight into how people operate in the Wasteland.

Cultist Traits Cultists are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapons. Bonus Class Skills: Gather Information, Knowledge (occult, street, and theology/philosophy), Perform (any), and Profession (any), and choose one of the following: Read/Write Language, Speak Language, or Craft (any).

Examples of cults to which a character can belong are outlined below: The Children of the Apocalypse are the remnants of a pre-War doomsday cult that evolved into a post-War doomsday cult. The Children preach a doctrine of “peace forged by war and hardship” and worship the Holy Flame that destroyed the world. The Savior’s Army is the remnants of a non-profit organization that originated in the 20 th century. They once collected clothes and food to provide to the needy and poor. After the Great War, and a large loss to their membership, the Savior’s changed their goals and now run small clinics throughout the wasteland, providing medical attention to those in need. The Techno-Reapers are a large cult that spread across the Wastelands, seeking to reap technology from forgotten locations and from the hands of individuals and organization that continue to bring the downfall of man. The Techno-Reapers believe that technology will restore earth to pre-Great War stasis and bring about the new age (a golden age) of man. Unity is a cult based on the belief that the body and spirit are one and that all souls are linked to each other by a degree of separation. Unity members are ranked into six degrees of separation from the Union of Souls. Members actively seek to enlighten non-believers and to convert non-believers views toward Unity.

Feral Child You spent most or all of your childhood in the wild. While the Wasteland is a dangerous place the maternal instincts of many species there remain strong. Miraculously you survived your abandonment, whether it was intentional or accidental, and through some unusual circ*mstance you have now returned to civilization.

Feral Child Traits Race Requirement: Human A feral child gains a +1 to Strength and Dexterity, and a +4 bonus to Survival skill checks. However, he lacks the mental capacity to understand civilized ways, suffering a – 1 penalty to Intelligence and Charisma. He is illiterate and must spend twice the normal amount of skill points to learn to speak a language and triple the skill points to learn to read/write a language. Feral Child is proficient with Simple Weapons Bonus Class Skills: Balance, Climb, Handle Animal, Jump, Knowledge (nature), and Survival.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Freed Slave You are a free slave after having escaped or been released by your former master. Most, if not all, of your life has been spent in servitude and you have been treated as little more than a beast of burden.

Freed Slave Traits Free Slaves are proficient with Simple Weapons. Slaves are usually worked to the point of death and if it doesn't kill them, it makes them stronger. Free Slave characters gain a +1 Constitution bonus.

Without laws to protect the exploitation of people, slavery is alive and well in most corners of the Illiteracy: Free Slaves are illiterate and cannot read or write world. In some places it is called by more civilized unless they purchase at least a single rank in Read/Write Language. terms such as indentured servitude but the net effect is the same: the buying, selling, and trading of Mark of Slavery: A brand or tattoo marks your body other human beings is not only accepted among somewhere obviously visible (generally the wrist, arm, or many communities but often encouraged. Slaves forehead) symbolizing your state as property of another. You are, in general, poorly educated laborers working in gain a –1 penalty to Charisma-based skill checks when utterly inhumane conditions. On rare occasions, dealing with NPCs able to see this mark. however, a master will provide training in literacy Bonus Class Skills: Craft (structural), Handle Animal, and math to have an educated servant. Invariably, Profession (butler, cook, farmer, laborer, guard, maid, and slaves carry some kind of brand identifying them as prostitute). a piece of property; the only way to remove this brand is to cut or burn it off, resulting in a large amount of scar tissue.

Gangster Traits Gangsters are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapon, Personal Firearms, and light armors. Bonus Class Skills: Barter, Bluff, Disguise, Intimidate, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Knowledge (street and underworld), Sense Motive, Sleight of Hand, and Spot.

Gangster You spent your formative years in or around an organized crime syndicate. Here you learned several important life lessons: intimidation can be the greatest form of negotiation; bullets speak louder than words; and, family and loyalty means everything even when all else has failed.

Gangs are a way of life anywhere there is disorder and lawlessness. Even in the Wasteland organized crime still exists and in some cases controls entire cities.

Mutant Defector After several years of military training with your Mutant squadron in Los Alamos, you have walked away from your militant brethren to find your own path in the Wastelands. Like other Mutant Defectors before you, you have sought the human controlled realms. One day your decision to leave the Mutant Army may come back to bite you in the ass, but such is life in the Wasteland.

Mutant Defector Traits

Race Requirement: Trans-Genetic Mutant

Mutant Defectors are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapon, Heavy Weapons, and Mutant Armor. Free Outfit: Fatigues (mutant-sized) Bonus Class Skills: Climb, Craft (structural), Hide, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (geography and tactics), Listen, Navigate, Search, Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival.

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Section 2: Backgrounds Radiant One You have spent a long time near a source of radiation and it has left its mark on you. While most Ghūls can tolerate those conditions you seem to almost enjoy irradiating yourself. Radiant Ones have absorbed, and consequently emit, so much radiation that they glow in the dark. They are considered outsiders even by other Ghūls, and smooth skins that spend any length of time around them will gradually become irradiated as well.

Radiant One Traits Race Requirement: Ghūl Radiant Ones are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapons. Glow in the Dark: Radiant Ones emit a radioactive light that provides illumination within a 20-foot radius. Anyone within this area is also subject to Low levels of Radiation (see Chapter 5 for more details on Radiation and it effects) Bonus Class Skills: Computer Use, Craft (mechanical), Repair, and Survival.

Shelter Dweller Your family was one of the fortunate individuals that made it to one of the great underground fallout shelters created by the United States Government during the Cold War in the late 20 th century, when the bombs began to fall in the Exodus. Your shelter either remained closed until recently or is still closed. You and your fellow Shelter Dwellers have little or no contact with the outside world; you have no idea what to expect as you venture into the Wasteland but seeking civilization should be one of your top priorities. These fallout shelters number in the hundreds and were scattered across the entire United States. While some of them failed or were victims of the government’s experiments, just as many of them remained intact, and the people inside these shelters were protected from the harshest effects of the War. Shelter Dwellers have spent entire generations in isolation and many of them view their existence as a mission to keep the flames of civilization alive. They have access to books, music, and art from the pre-War world, and their technology is often the envy of the entire Wasteland. Characters with this background are not especially suited to life in the Wasteland but often have valuable technical know-how that convinces others to keep them around.

Shelter Dweller Traits Race Requirement: Human Shelter Dwellers are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapon, and Personal Firearms. Increased Intelligence: Shelter Dwellers gain a +1 bonus to all Intelligence-based skill checks do to the years spent around computers and literature. Bonus Class Skills: Computer Use, Craft (any), Diplomacy, Knowledge (engineering, history, medicine, science, and technology), Perform (any), Repair, and Research.

Survivalist You are from a community that places value on survival above all else. Typically this means a distrust of outsiders and something resembling military training; it can also mean utter isolation in an underground cave or behind enormous town walls. In either case, you can survive on your own, and large towns or organizations are to be trusted only when absolutely necessary. Many of the smaller communities in the Wasteland can trace their origin back to various paramilitary and survivalist groups from before Survivalist Traits the War. These communities tend to be extremely Survivalists are proficient with Simple and Archaic xenophobic and self-sufficient. They turn away Weapon, Personal Firearms, and light armors. traders and those seeking help and make contact with the outside world only in the most dire of Bonus Feat: A survivalist may choose either Guide or circ*mstances. Unlike Tribals, Survivalists cling to Track as a bonus starting feat. the old way of life, even though they view the Bonus Class Skills: Climb, Craft (structural), Handle past's governments and wars as responsible for Animal, Hide, Knowledge (geography), Navigate, the current state of their affairs. Profession (any), Ride, and Survival.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Techno-Reaper You are a member of the Techno-Reaper cult. Unlike other cultists, you’re not interested in metaphysics as much as you are technology. For you technology is not just important; it is the one thing that will save the human race from extinction. It is your goal to save technology no matter the cost.

Techno-Reaper Traits Reapers are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapon, Personal Firearms, and light and medium armors. Bonus Class Skills: Computer Use, Craft (electronic), Craft (mechanical), Decipher Script, Disable Device, Knowledge (science and technology) Repair, and Search.

The Techno-Reapers are a technophile cult based out of an old military research center in San Antonio, Texas, but have opened many splinter cells in large wasteland cities. Unlike typical cults the TechnoReapers do not necessarily worship technology; although to an outsider it might appear so; rather, the Techno-Reapers take whatever means necessary to preserve it.

Tribal You come from one of the countless tribal societies that have come to exist in the years since the war. Sometimes avoiding technology by choice, and sometimes forced to abandon it because no one in the settlement remembers how to use it, your society has instead learned how to live off land and created a new way of life for itself.

Tribal Traits Tribals are proficient with Simple Weapons. Illiteracy: Tribals are illiterate and cannot read or write unless they purchase at least a single rank in Read/Write Language. Bonus Feat: Track

the

Bonus Class Skills: Climb, Craft (structural), Handle Animal, Knowledge (nature), Perform (dance), Profession (cook, farmer, hunter, laborer, and guard), and Survival.

Tribals are far more self-sufficient than city dwellers as they have forced themselves to stand on their own rather than using the ruins of civilization as a crutch. They have developed their own societies, often based around a single elder or chief, and many of them practice sophisticated animist or mystic traditions. Ancestor worship or veneration is common as are the practices of tattooing and piercing. Tribals often speak a pidgin form of the local pre-War language because of their relative isolation from the rest of the post-War world, though they do trade with other tribal communities and occasionally outsiders. Although many of these outsiders treat them as primitives, Tribals often know more about the world at large than they let on.

Urban Survivor You grew up among the scum of society while living on the streets. Whether located in a small town or the gutters of a more glamorous city you did what you needed to do to survive with the hand that was dealt to you.

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Urban Survivor Traits Urban Survivors are proficient with Simple Weapons and Personal Firearms. Urban Survivors gains a +4 insight bonus to Survival (urban) skill checks when in urban settings. Bonus Class Skills: Barter, Bluff, Gamble, Gather Information, Knowledge (civics and street), Profession (drug dealer, mechanic, merchant, messenger or prostitute), and Sleight of Hand.

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Section 3: Character Classes Wanderer You have felt the pull of wanderlust for most of your years and have not fought against it. Perhaps your family was traveling merchants or members of a carnival, or maybe you just left home at an early age and have not settled down yet. Either way, you have a lot of experience with life on the road and you would not have it any other way.

Wanderer Traits Wanderers are proficient with Simple and Archaic Weapon, Personal Firearms, and light and medium armors. Bonus Feat: Wanderers know how to survive in the wilderness and how to get from town to town and gain a bonus feat to start with. The feat can be selected from: Endurance, Great Fortitude, Guide, Iron Will, Low Profile, Lighting Reflexes, Renown, Toughness, or Track.

Many Wasteland dwellers never see much of the world beyond the walls of their town. Some, Bonus Class Skills: Bluff, Gamble, Gather Information, however, just cannot seem to settle down. Knowledge (geography and street), Navigate, Profession They might be mercenaries offering their (guard), and Survival. military skills to the highest bidder, merchants aiming for bargains, or just vagabonds looking for a place to fit in and never finding it. Whatever the reason for their travels, Wanderers have seen more in their lives than ten “normal” people and tend to be well-rounded individuals.

Section 3: Character Classes Rather than offering several classes that reflect the possible roles that characters can take on, there are two “template” classes that serve as the available choices for all Exodus characters. These two templates are known as the Aggressive and the Defensive Class. As the character progresses, he may gain certain specialized training or join one of many Wasteland organizations. These further specializations and affiliations are reflected in the various advanced classes, detailed in Chapter 6.

The Post-Apocalyptic Character There are two types of characters that wander the Wasteland: the Aggressive Class and the Defensive Class. The Aggressive Class character is someone that will initiate conflicts and generally knows how to wield a weapon and defend himself. This type of character focuses more on combat and less on other skills. A Defensive Class character is someone that will generally avoid a conflict if possible and is more helpful to his fellow man. When in combat he has learned how to duck and dodge danger better than most aggressors. This type of character focuses more on defense and skills, than on combat.

The Custom Class For a fully customizable character, a system has been formulated in Appendix A to create a character with the basics of the d20 OGC class types.

Hit Die Aggressive class characters gain 1d10 hit points per level, while Defensive class characters gain 1d8 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier is applied as a bonus to this amount at each level. At 1st level characters receive the maximum possible hit points plus their Constitution modifier.

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Saving Throws A character has three saving throws (Fortitude, Reflex, and Will), but does not have equal bonuses to them. The character's save progression is according to the Class charts below or chooses a progression in the Custom Class, with each of the three saves designated as corresponding to one of the Saves 1, 2, and 3 column. Example: A character taking the Aggressive Class chooses Reflex for Save 1, Fortitude for Save 2, and Will for Save 3. Any further levels in Aggressive Class will feature this same save progression. If the character takes a level in the Defensive Class he may declare which of that class's saves correspond to which column; but, further levels must follow that progression. The Advanced Class has fixed saves from level 1 onward.

Karma Points

Karma Points is a pool of points that a character receives upon gaining a level. The point total equals 3 plus ½ character level (plus any other bonuses from a class feature or Feat). Each time the character advances a level, his Karma Point pool refreshes to maximum points total as denoted above (the points gained do not add to the existing total, if any; instead, they replace the pool point total). Karma Points can be spent as described in Appendix A: Custom Class.

Class Skills

The Wasteland Hero chooses three different skills at character creation, called “Tag Skills”, to become additional class skills. A Tag Skill allows a character to exceed the normal skill rank by +2 (skill rank limit becomes character level +5 instead of +3). The Exodus Hero can never choose new Tag Skills (unless provided from a background or by taking the feat Tag!), even if the Hero changes to an advanced class (although advanced classes may confer new class skills). Should a character chose a skill that does not have ranks, such as Read/Write Language or Speak Language, the character instead gains one bonus language in that field.

Skill Points In Exodus, it is possible for a character to gain zero skill points at character creation or upon advancing a level if the character has a negative modifier to INT that put his skill points gained to or below 0. Plainly put, the character is too dumb to learn and maintain the Intelligence to possess any non-physical skills. In this case the character instead gains ½ skill points per level (two skill-points at first level) and can only apply the ½ skill point to his class skills and the following untrained skills: Climb, Intimidate, Hide, Jump, Listen, and Spot. Gifted applies to this rule and reduces the ½ skill point to ¼ skill points per level and 1 skill point at first level.

A character's Background or Occupation may provide him with additional class skills or starting skill points at creation. If a character gains a class skill more than once through Background or Occupation, that skill gains a +1 Competence bonus each time the character gains the class skill.

Aggressive Class Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Int modifier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Defensive Class Skill Points at 1st Level: (5 + Int modifier) x 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Starting Feats All characters start with at least two Feats at 1 st level (one from character creation and one for 1st level) and they must meet the prerequisites for the Feats. These Feats may be chosen from this guidebook or other Exodus sourcebooks. Additionally all characters begin play with the Simple Weapons Proficiency feat in addition to any Feats conferred by a Background or an Occupation, unless otherwise noted.

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Section 3: Character Classes Class Features The following are class features of both Aggressive and Defensive Class characters.

Bonus Feats

At 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th level, characters receive a bonus feat that may be selected from this guidebook or other Exodus sourcebooks.

Talents

At 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th level an Exodus character selects a talent from the talent trees detailed in Section 6 below. As long as the character meets the prerequisites for the talent, he can select freely from any and all of talent trees. No talent can be selected more than once unless expressly indicated.

Defense Bonus A character receives a bonus to his defense based on character level that stacks with all other bonuses to his total Defense as noted on the tables below. Aggressive Class (HD d10) Class Base Attack Level Bonus Save 1 1st +1 +2 2nd +2 +3 3rd +3 +3 4th +4 +4 5th +5 +4 6th +6/+1 +5 7th +7/+2 +5 8th +8/+3 +6 9th +9/+4 +6 10th +10/+5 +7

Save 2 +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Save 3 +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Class Features Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Defensive Class (HD d8) Class Base Attack Level Bonus 1st +0 2nd +1 3rd +1 4th +2 5th +2 6th +3 7th +3 8th +4 9th +4 10th +5

Save 2 +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Save 3 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Class Features Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat Talent Bonus feat

Defense Bonus +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Save 1 +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Multi-class Characters A character may add new classes as he progresses in levels (this includes the standard classes listed above and Advanced Classes list in Chapter 6), thereby becoming a multi-class character. The class abilities from all of a character’s classes combine to determine a multi-class character’s overall abilities.

Multi-class vs. Custom Class The Custom Class can be multi-classed with the Aggressive and Defensive Class, and Advanced Classes.

Class and Level Features As a general rule, the abilities of a multi-class character are the sum of the abilities provided by each of the character’s classes.

The Custom Class can also be multi-classed as long as the variables of the formula are changed. This, however, can be abusive by experienced players and is recommended that the Overseer restrict this option or review the new Custom Class to multi-class and track the changes of the class in a template as Custom A, B, and so forth.

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Level

“Character level” is a character’s total number of levels. It is used to determine when feats and ability score increases are gained. BAB +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 +11 +12 +13 +14 +15 +16 +17 +18 +19 +20

Additional Attacks at +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5

“Class level” is the character’s level in a particular class. For a hero whose levels are all in the same class, character level and class level are the same.

Hit Points A hero gains hit points from each class as his class level increases, adding the new hit points to the previous total.

Base Attack Bonus Add the base attack bonuses for each class to get the hero’s base attack bonus. A resulting value of +6 or higher provides the hero with multiple attacks. To use multiple attacks in the same round, a character must use a full attack, which is a full-round action.

Saving Throws Add the base save bonuses for each class together.

Defense Bonus

Add the Defense bonuses for each class together.

Skills

A multi-class hero uses his total character level to determine the maximum ranks the hero can have in a skill. If a skill is a class skill for any of a multi-class hero’s classes, it is a class skill for all of his classes and functions as a class skill to determine the skill’s maximum rank. (The maximum rank for a class skill is 3 + character level.) If a character gains a class skill more than once by multi-classing, that skill gains a +1 Competence bonus equal to the number of times the character gains that class skill.

Class Features

The character gets all class features (talents, bonus feats, or other special abilities) of all classes for the levels he possesses.

Feats A multi-class character receives a new feat every three character levels, regardless of individual class level. Taking one level in a new class does not entitle a character to receive the two feats that a beginning 1st-level character gets.

Ability Increases

A multi-class character increases one ability score by +1 every four character levels, regardless of individual class level.

Adding a Second Class

When a character with one class gains a level, he may choose to increase the level of his current class or pick up a new class at 1st level. This could be a basic class or, if the character qualifies for it, an advanced class. The character gains the 1st-level base attack bonus, base save bonuses, class skills, other class features of the new class, hit points of the appropriate die type, and the new class’s number of skill points gained at each additional level (not that number x4, as is the case for a 1st-level character). Picking up a new class is not exactly the same as starting a character in that class. When picking up a new class, a hero does not receive maximum hit points but should roll the new Hit Die.

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Section 3: Character Classes Advancing a Level

Each time a multi-class character attains a new level, the hero either increases one of his current class levels by one or picks up a new class at 1st level. When a multi-class character increases one of his class levels by one, the character gets all the standard benefits that characters receive for attaining the new level in that class: more hit points, possible bonuses on attack rolls, Defense, and saving throws (depending on the class and the new level), a new class feature (as defined by the class), and new skill points. Skill points are spent according to the class that the multi-class character just advanced in. Skills are purchased at the cost appropriate for that class. In general, a character can have levels in as many different classes as there are classes.

Age As the character ages, his physical ability scores decrease and his mental ability scores increase, as detailed on the Aging Effects table. The effects of each aging step are cumulative. Aging Effects Age Category Human Child (1–11) Young adult (12–15) Adult (16–39) Middle age (40–59) Old (60–79) Venerable (80+)

Ability Adjustments Trans-Gen Mutant None Young adult (15–30) Adult (31–50) Middle age (51–70) Old (71–89) Venerable (90+)

Ghūl None None Adult (51–100) Middle age (101–200) Old (201–299) Venerable (300+)

Experience Table EXP Level

Humans

Ghūls

Trans-Genetic Mutants

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

1000 3000 6000 10000 15000 21000 28000 36000 45000 55000

1300 3900 7800 13000 19500 27300 36400 46800 58500 71500

1500 4500 9000 15000 22500 31500 42000 54000 67500 82500

12

66000

85800

99000

13 14

78000 91000

101400 118300

117000 136500

15

105000

136500

157500

16 17 18 19

120000 136000 153000 171000

156000 176800 198900 222300

180000 204000 229500 256500

20

190000

247000

285000

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Acquired Ability Feat Talent — Feat Stat Increase +1 Talent Feat — Stat Increase +1 Feat Talent — Stat Increase +1 Feat — — Feat Talent Stat Increase +1 — Feat — Stat Increase +1 Talent

–3 to Str and Con; –1 to Dex, Int, Wis, and Cha Original scores Original scores –1 to Str, Dex, and Con; +1 to Int, Wis, and Cha –1 to Str, Dex, and Con; +1 to Int, Wis, and Cha –1 to Str, Dex, and Con; +1 to Int, Wis, and Cha

Experience Experience (EXP) is what gauges a character’s overall power. All characters start at 0 experience (level 1) and must learn life lessons through experiencing the world. Experience is earned through a variety of life lessons from Combat, RolePlaying, and Situational Encounters as well as bonuses for Story Completion. Each type of encounter handles EXP differently. Combat Experience is detailed in the Exodus Bestiary while the other forms of Experience are detailed in the Overseers Guide. All character races require a goal number (as denoted on the experience table below) to obtain the next level of experience. Once achieving the required amount of experience the player updates his character to that level achievement. The player may advance his current character class level by one, or add another base class or advance class at its lowest class level to his Experience Level. Characters with multiple class levels may select what class to advance in level upon acquiring his goal, and only gains the numeric adjustments and abilities from that class level. See Multi-Class above.

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Acquired Abilities At certain levels of Experience a character gains an acquired ability that enhances the character’s overall abilities. Acquired abilities are broken up into three fields as denoted below:

Feat A character gains an acquired feat at first level and every level divisible by 3 thereafter. The character may select any feat that he meets the requirements for.

Stat Increase

A character gains a +1 Ability Point statistic increase every level divisible by 4. This is a bonus increase and does not count toward any ability generation or character build. The character may add the +1 Stat Increase to any Ability Score of his choosing.

Talent

A character gains an acquired talent at first level and every level divisible by 5. The character may select any talent that he meets the requirements for.

Section 4: Traits Traits are characteristics that characters are born with or acquire earlier in life thanks to dedication, accidents, trauma, or other such unusual circ*mstances. Choosing a Trait or combination of them is optional, but a character may have no more than two.

Afraid: The character is afraid of something (choose an object of fear approved by your Overseer), staying constantly aware of his surroundings. This trait grants the character a +2 Spot bonus. Due to the character’s paranoia, however, his initiative suffers a –1 penalty from hesitation. When left alone to face the object of his fear the character suffers a –2 Defense until the source of the fear is removed.

Beautiful: The character is stunningly gorgeous and receives a +1 Charisma bonus and a +3% fame

bonus to a single reputation category. There is envy, however, causing jealousy from other NPCs that may lead into non-violent or violent confrontations. Then again there are also slavers that will attempt to capture you for your beauty at any given chance to put you on the slaver market.

Big and Dumb: The character was born dim-witted and clumsy and suffers a –1 penalty to Dexterity, Intelligence, and Charisma. He also suffers from slow reaction, and receives a –5 penalty to speed. Nature, however, granted him with increased Strength. The character gains a +3 bonus to Strength.

Bloody Mess: By some strange twist of fate people around this character die violently. He sees the worst ways in which people die. NPCs and creatures that die by being reduced to -10 or fewer hit points near the character explode into a gory mass of blood and body parts. It is up to the Overseer to give the characters the graphic description.

Book Smart: The character is naturally intelligent and gains a +1 bonus to Intelligence. All

Knowledge skills become class skills for the character. This superior intellect, however, means the character spent more time in the library instead of defending himself and suffers a –1 penalty to Attack Rolls.

Bruiser: The character is a little slower, but a little bigger. His initiative suffers a –2 penalty, but he deals an additional +1 point of damage with his melee attacks.

Chemical Reliance: The character thrives on chemical addictions. He gains a +10% penalty to chemical substances addiction, but if he becomes addicted, the addiction Fortitude DC is reduced by –10.

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Section 4: Traits Chemical Resistance: The character is resistant to chemical addictions. He gains a –10% bonus to chemical substances addiction, but if he becomes addicted, the addiction Fortitude DC is increased by +10.

Clumsy: The character is extremely clumsy but his lack of grace often results in dumb luck. He gains a –1 penalty to Dexterity, but gains +1 Karma Point.

Extreme Personality: The character possesses a memorable personality and people react more strongly to his presence. The character gains a +1 Charisma bonus but when he gains infamy, he earns double the points to that Reputation Category.

Fast Metabolism: The character has a metabolic rate twice what a normal character would have. He heals at twice the normal rate per day of rest but his Fortitude saves against radiation and poison suffers a –2 penalty.

Fear the Reaper (Ghūl only): This Ghūl has cheated death! He gains acquired Feats at the normal rate of 3rd level and every multiple of 3 thereafter as detailed in Chapter 3. Unfortunately he is now on deaths short list! When reaching 0 or negative hit points you’re dead Jim, there is no saving you. Normal: Ghūls gain an acquired Feat at 4th level and every multiple of 4 thereafter.

Flexible: The character is extremely flexible and can contort his body easily. He gains a +1 Dexterity

and can enter areas that are one category size smaller than him without terrain impediments. The character has difficulty, however, developing muscle mass and suffers a –1 penalty to Strength.

Gifted: The character has honed his body and mind beyond the average person and gains a +1 bonus to each Ability Score. He has neglected training practical skills, though, and receives only half of the base skill points for his class per level, before adding skill points earned from a high Intelligence modifier. This penalty to skill points applies to the character starting skill as well, which the x4 multiplier is also cut in half to x2. (Aggressive would start with 4 skill points and Defensive 6 skill points). Good Natured: The character has a good soul and helps when and where he can. He receives a +1 bonus to Charisma-based skill checks, but receives a –1 penalty to attack rolls (you know that pacifist nature). Ham Fisted (Trans-Genetic Mutants only): Genetic engineering has endowed this mutant with

huge hands. His unarmed attacks deal lethal damage (1d6 + STR). He suffers, however, a –2 penalty to all Dexterity-based skills that require the use of his hands and has difficulty with pulling the trigger on firearms. When a Ham Fisted character attempts to shoot a firearm not in the Heavy Weapon category he takes a –4 penalty to his attack rolls (this stacks with the Trans-Genetic Mutant racial penalty for a total of –8).

Heavy Handed: The character knows how to throw a punch that'll hurt into next week instead of just tomorrow morning. His unarmed attacks deals double his Strength modifier in lethal damage but he has forgotten how to pull his punches and cannot deal non-lethal damage with them. Idiot Savant: The character has a small brain limiting his Intelligence to a maximum of 6. His brain, however, focuses on a single area of expertise. The character gains a +5 competence bonus to one of the following skills: Craft (any), Demolition, Disable Device, Knowledge (any), or Repair.

Jinxed: The character has a large dose of bad mojo and refreshes his Karma Point pool only on

odd level advancements instead of each level as a normal character would. Additionally, when a critical failure (a natural 1 on a d20) is rolled on an attack by anyone (including the character) within 60 feet of the jinxed character an effect is determined from the table in Appendix C unless they spend a Karma Point to negate the effect, though their attack still misses.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Kamikaze: The character does not think or worry about threats, allowing him to act faster but exposing him to more danger in combat. He gains the Improved Initiative feat as a bonus feat, but cannot benefit from any Dexterity or dodge bonuses to Defense.

Large Body: The character is larger than the normal person. He gains a +1 bonus to both Strength and Constitution but suffers a –2 penalty to Dexterity.

Lucky: The character is lucky and gains +1 Karma Point. If the character expends all of his Karma Points, he gains the Jinxed trait until he regains at least one.

Gender Male Female Male Female

Base Height Height Modifier 72 in. +3d4 in. 66 in. +3d4 in. Average Height 80 in. (6’ 8”) 74 in. (6’ 2”)

Base Weight Weight Modifier 180 lb. x2d4 lb. 127 lb. x2d4 lb. Average Weight 220 lb. 167 lb.

Night Person: The character is a night person. When the sun goes down, or in dimly lit areas, the character gains low-light vision and a +1 bonus to Spot skill checks. During the day or in brightly lit areas he suffers from light sensitivity and gains a –1 penalty on attack rolls.

One Hander: One of the character’s hands is very dominant. He excels with single-handed weapons and gains a +1 bonus to attack rolls with them, but weapons wielded in two hands cause problems resulting in a -4 penalty to attack rolls.

Physically Fit: Years of toning and training has built up the character’s stamina. He gains a +1 bonus to Strength and Constitution but in his years of training he has neglected the learning arts and suffers a –1 penalty to Intelligence and Wisdom.

Sex Appeal: The character has a way with members of the opposite sex, but this tends to annoy those that share their gender with him. He gains a +2 bonus to Charisma-based skill checks with the opposite sex and a –2 penalty on the same with members of the same sex.

Sickly: The character was born with a weak immune system and suffers a –1 penalty to Constitution. His will to survive is great, though, and he receives a +2 bonus to Will saving throws.

Skilled: The character has spent more time improving her skills than a normal person. She gains a +1 to all Skills but only acquires Feats every fourth level instead of every third level (fifth level instead of forth for Ghūls).

Small Frame: The character is smaller than other people. He gains a +1 bonus to Dexterity, but suffers a –1 STR penalty to Carrying Capacity and Encumbrance. The character’s size is medium, but on the short end of the ruler and suffers a –5 to speed.

Gender Male Female Male Female

Base Height Height Modifier 54 in. +2d6 in. 50 in. +2d6 in. Average Height 61 in. (5’ 1”) 57 in. (4’ 7”)

Base Weight Weight Modifier 90 lb. x2d4 lb. 64 lb. x2d4 lb. Average Weight 125 lb. 99 lb.

Super Genius: The character is smarter than the average bear.

He gains a +3 bonus to Intelligence, but suffers a –1 penalty to all WIS and CHR based skill checks as he comes off smug and over analyzes reasonable situations.

Tech Wizard: The character is good at improvising and improving technological devices. The character receives a +1 bonus to Computer Use, Craft (electronic), Knowledge (technology), and Repair skills to fix technological devices. Due to spending so much time among machines the character has become sheltered and receives a –1 penalty to all Wisdom-based skill checks.

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Section 5: Occupations

Section 5: Occupations The Post-Apocalyptic world revolves around occupations. If occupations did not exist in the Wasteland, society would fail to continue onward, and towns would succumb to ruin. Someone must do the job, and the listing below is the occupations of Wasteland inhabitants. Much like a Background, a character must choose an Occupation at character creation – however, there is the 'No Occupation' option for those who have not yet found a calling in the Wasteland. An occupation offers the character a chance to choose two extra class skills from a given occupation and determines the character’s starting wealth in steel coins.

Academic Academics include librarians, scribes, teachers, and other education professionals in the Wasteland. Prerequisite: INT and WIS 13 Class Skills (choose two): Computer Use, Craft (writing), Decipher Script, Gather Information, Knowledge (civics, engineering, history, medicine, science, technology, or theology and philosophy), and Research. Starting Wealth: 300 coins

Adventurer Adventurers include explorers, field scientists, technology hunters, thrill-seekers, and others called to face danger for a variety of reasons. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Climb, Demolitions, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (geography, nature, street, tactics, technology, or underworld), Move Silently, Ride, Spot, Survival, Swim, and Treat Injury. Bonus Feat: Select one of the following: Archaic Weapons Proficiency, Brawl, or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

Athlete Athletes are the professional sportsmen of the Wasteland that generally fight in blood-sport arenas or fight clubs in various settlements. They include boxers, martial artists, and wrestlers. Prerequisite: STR or DEX 15 Class Skills (choose two): Balance, Climb, Jump, Knowledge (tactics), Ride, Swim, and Tumble. Bonus Feat: Brawl. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

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Bison Herder Bison Herders make their living off the bovine (cattle, oxen, and buffalo) meat trade. They range from drivers to wranglers, or perhaps even operate a slaughterhouse. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Barter, Craft (Structural), Drive, Handle Animal, Navigate, and Ride. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

City Worker The City Worker occupation covers various menial jobs that contribute to the success of a settlement. Such jobs could be construction, factory work, food services, or janitorial. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Craft (electronic, mechanical, and structural), Climb, Handle Animal, Knowledge (civics or street), Repair, and Ride. Starting Wealth: 200 coins

Creative Artist The Creative Artist occupation covers artists of all types who fan their creative spark into a career. Actors, illustrators, musicians, and sculptors all fall under this occupation. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Craft (visual art or writing), Disguise, Forgery, Perform (any), and Spot. Starting Wealth: 200 coins

Criminal Criminal is the most common occupation in the Wasteland simply because it is easier to take things from others than to earn it through hard work. This occupation includes con artists, burglars, thieves, crime family soldiers, gang members, bank robbers, and any other type of career criminal. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Disable Device, Disguise, Forgery, Gamble, Hide, Knowledge (street, tactics, or underworld), Move Silently, and Sleight of Hand. Bonus Feat: Select either Brawl or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

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Section 5: Occupations Dilettante Dilettante is the gentleman's term for a high-class lady of the night in the Wasteland. The difference between Dilettantes and a common hooker is that they attend social events and work in a brothel or cathouse instead of on a street corner. Prerequisite: CHR 15 Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Diplomacy, Gamble, Intimidate, and Knowledge (street). Starting Wealth: 400 coins Reputation Bonus: +5% to any one fame category.

Drifter Drifters are aimless wanderers and world wise jack-of-all-trades who move between cities working odd jobs until boredom or fate leads them elsewhere. Along the way, they learn strange customs and pick up interesting and diverse skills. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Decipher Script, Disable Device, Disguise, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Hide, Knowledge (street), Navigate, and Sleight of Hand. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

Doctor This occupation covers doctors, field medics, and tribal healers. All Doctors in the Wasteland are physicians (general practitioners). Prerequisite: INT 13 and WIS 13 Class Skills (choose two): Concentration, Craft (chemical), Computer Use, Knowledge (medicine, science, or technology), Search, and Treat Injury. Starting Wealth: 400 coins

Investigative There are a number of jobs that fit within this occupation including investigative reporters, private investigators, police detectives, espionage agents, and others who use their skills to gather evidence and analyze clues. Prerequisite: INT 13 Class Skills (choose two): Computer Use, Craft (visual art or writing), Decipher Script, Forgery, Gather Information, Investigate, Knowledge (civics, sciences, street, or theology and philosophy), Research, Search, and Sense Motive. Bonus Feat: Select either Brawl or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 200 coins

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Law Enforcement The Law Enforcement of the Wasteland varies as much as the laws do. Some are local peace officers appointed by an otherwise unaffiliated town, or deputies in a specific region. On the other side of the coin, the Law Enforcement occupation is also the domain of corrupt organizations like the Wasteland Syndicate. Prerequisite: WIS 12, CHR 13 Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, Investigate, Knowledge (civics, history, street, or tactics), Listen, Search, Sense Motive, and Spot. Bonus Feat: Select one of the following: Combat Martial Arts, Armor Proficiency (light), or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

Merchant Although trade has diminished after the War, it is certainly not dead. There is good deal of money to be made from trading goods – especially pre-War goods – and merchants know this. They can range from small-time shopkeepers in a local bazaar to members of the Water Merchants or even owners of large caravans that ply the Wastes, selling goods to communities that would otherwise have no contact with the outside world. Prerequisite: CHR 13 Class Skills (choose two): Barter, Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Knowledge (civics and street), Navigate, and Sense Motive. Starting Wealth: 400 coins

Military The Military occupation covers service in a large settlement’s standing army or city militia or tribal warriors. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Climb, Hide, Knowledge (tactics), Move Silently, Navigate, Survival, and Swim. Bonus Feat: Select one of the following: Brawl, Combat Martial Arts, Armor Proficiency (light), or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

No Occupation This option is for characters that choose not to take a starting occupation. The character has no occupation. The character may, however, choose two skills to become class skills (this is not an additional Tag! option, these are normal skills). Starting Wealth: 50 coins

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Section 5: Occupations Outcast “Outcast” is not so much an occupation as a forced way of life. Persecuted and exiled for being different, Outcasts are lone pariahs or shunned members of a culture whose customs or characteristics society finds deviant or abhorrent. Outcasts lurk on the fringes of civilization. Some strive for acceptance, while others are trapped by their own feelings of resentment, self-loathing, or hopelessness. Prerequisites: None Class Skills (choose two): Disguise, Hide, Knowledge (street), Search, Survival, and Treat Injury. Bonus Feat: Toughness. Starting Wealth: 50 coins

Raider With little to no law enforcement in many parts of the Wastelands, it is always easier to take what is not yours rather than to work for it. It is hardly a surprise that Raider gangs have sprung up almost everywhere. Raiders, it should be noted, almost exclusively live in camps in the Wasteland – once they settle in a town, they are classified as gang members. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Climb, Gamble, Hide, Intimidate, Jump, Move Silently, Search, Spot, and Survival. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

Ranger Anyone who makes his living by venturing deep into the Wasteland could be considered a Ranger. Instead some more formal ranger organizations, such as the famed Desert Rangers, make their members go through a rigorous training process. Either way, Rangers are adept at survival in conditions where others would give up and die. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Balance, Climb, Handle Animal, Hide, Jump, Listen, Knowledge (geography or nature), Move Silently, Navigate, Ride, Search, Spot, Survival, and Swim. Bonus Feat: Track Starting Wealth: 100 coins

Religious Religion exists in the Wasteland, through several organizations, cultists, and the traditional church clergy. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Decipher Script, Knowledge (history, science, street, or theology and philosophy), Listen, and Sense Motive. Starting Wealth: 200 coins

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Technician Scientists and engineers of all types fit within the scope of this starting occupation. Prerequisite: INT 13 Class Skills (choose two): Computer Use, Craft (chemical, electronic, mechanical, or structural), Knowledge (civics, science or technology), Repair, and Research. Starting Wealth: 300 coins

Scavenger Scavengers turn society’s wreckage and discarded trash into useful tools or items for trade. They effortlessly navigate and strip clean the most treacherous places in the Wasteland whether abandoned space stations, gutted buildings, or smoking battlefields. Prerequisites: None Class Skills (choose two): Climb, Craft (salvage), Disable Device, Hide, Jump, Knowledge (technology), Move Silently, Repair, Search, Spot, and Survival. Starting Wealth: 200 coins

Slaver Slavers are anyone connected to the slave trade that is not a slave. Nearly all happen to be members of the Slaver’s Guild, one of the few organizations in the Wastes that can be said to be truly “worldwide,” since despite a lack of central leadership members can be found in all the areas of the former United States that are still inhabited. Slavers identify each other by a distinctive tattoo on their face which also acts as a means of retaining Guild members (as former slavers are easily identified). It also prevents slavers from entering places that have formally outlawed the slave trade or the Slaver’s Guild in particular. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Barter, Bluff, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Intimidate, Knowledge (street or underworld), and Sense Motive. Starting Wealth: 300 coins

Soldier Soldiers range from professional killers in NEMO and elite tribal warriors to mercenaries for hire and the semi-professional caravan guards that accompany merchants across the Wastes. Soldiering represents either a certain degree of formal military training, or having lived long enough to learn how to stay alive in a serious firefight. Prerequisite: None Class Skills (choose two): Hide, Demolitions, Intimidate, Knowledge (tactics), Move Silently, Navigate, Spot, and Survival. Bonus Feat: Select one of the following: Brawl, Combat Martial Arts, Armor Proficiency (light), or Personal Firearms Proficiency. Starting Wealth: 100 coins

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Section 5: Occupations Wise Guy Wise Guy is a generic term for someone who has made his living by being connected to organized crime. Characters with this occupation have connections in the criminal underworld, but they are also beholden to the crime syndicate in which they are members – and, more often than not, they are fair game for opposing crime syndicates. Prerequisite: Gangster background Class Skills (choose two): Bluff, Demolitions, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Intimidate, Knowledge (civics, occult, street, tactics, or underworld), Listen, Move Silently, Search, Sense Motive, Sleight of Hand, and Spot. Starting Wealth: 400 coins

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Section 6: Talent Trees A character acquires a Talent at 1st level and at every level divisible by 5 thereafter. Additionally, starting at 3rd level and at every odd level thereafter, the Aggressive, Custom, or Defensive classes gains a bonus Talent. Some Advanced Classes may also grant a Talent as a Class Ability. A character may choose a talent from the list below. Some talents require a pre-requisite to be taken before they can be acquired. Talent Tree Charm Charm Favor Captivate Alluring Gaze Damage Reduction Damage Reduction Improved Damage Reduction1 Advanced Damage Reduction1 Defensive Evasion Uncanny Dodge 1 Uncanny Dodge 2 Defensive Roll Opportunist Empathic Empathy Improved Aid Another Intuition Energy Resistance Acid Resistance Cold Resistance Electrical Resistance Fire Resistance Radiation Resistance Sonic / Concussion Resistance Extreme Effort Extreme Effort Improved Extreme Effort Advanced Extreme Effort Fast-Talk Fast-Talk Dazzle Smooth Talker Silver Tongue Taunt Gunslinger Gunslinger Pistoleer Machine Gun Johnny Hand to Hand Strong Attack Hammer Attack Haymaker Attack Fisticuff Pugilist Healing Healing Knack Healing Touch 1 Healing Touch 2

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Charm Charm, Favor Charm, Favor, Captivate One talent from either the Energy Resistance or Unbreakable Talent Trees Damage Reduction Improved Damage Reduction

Evasion Evasion, Uncanny Dodge 1 Evasion, Uncanny Dodge 1 Evasion

Empathy Empathy

Extreme Effort Extreme Effort, Improved Extreme Effort

Fast-Talk Fast-Talk Fast-Talk, Smooth Talker Fast-Talk, Dazzle Personal Firearm Personal Firearm, Gunslinger Personal Firearm, Gunslinger, Pistoleer Strength 13, Brawl Strength 15, Brawl, Strong Attack Strength 17, Brawl, Strong Attack, Hammer Attack Brawl Fisticuff

Healing Knack Healing Knack, Healing Touch 1

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Section 6: Talents Ignore Hardness Ignore Hardness Improved Ignore Hardness Advanced Ignore Hardness Increased Speed Increased Speed Improved Increased Speed Advanced Increased Speed Insightful Skill Emphasis Aware Faith Cool Under Pressure Leadership Coordinate Inspiration Greater Inspiration Martial Arts Karate Judo Kendo Melee Smash Melee Smash Improved Melee Smash Advanced Melee Smash Mr. Handy Mechanic Mr. Goodwrench Quicker than the Eye Matchstick Man Quick Disguise Research Savant Linguist Scientist Chemist Mr. Bunsen Burner Spontaneous Fighting Blades Improvised Weapons Stealth Locksmith Magician The Shadow Whisper on the Wind Exploit Vulnerability Improved Exploit Vulnerability Strategy Exploit Weakness Plan Trick Survival Skilled Hunter Dousing Rod Camouflage Beast Soother Ambush Bug Pathfinder

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Ignore Hardness Ignore Hardness, Improved Ignore Hardness

Increased Speed Increased Speed, Improved Increased Speed

Skill Emphasis Skill Emphasis Skill Emphasis and either Aware or Faith

Coordinate Coordinate, Inspiration Dexterity 13, Defensive Martial Arts Dexterity 15, Defensive Martial Arts, Karate Dexterity 17, Defensive Martial Arts, Karate, Judo

Melee Smash Melee Smash , Improved Melee Smash

Mechanic

Intelligence 15 Chemist

Dexterity 15 Dexterity 15 The Shadow, Whisper on the Wind Exploit Weakness, The Shadow, Whisper on the Wind One talent from the Research Talent Tree One talent from the Research Talent Tree One talent from the Research Talent Tree

Two talents from the Survival Talent Tree Two talents from the Survival Talent Tree

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Robust

Exodus Talent Trees The talent trees presented in Exodus d20 differ slightly from those presented in the d20 Modern Core Rulebook in the aspect that they are not class-linked and any character can choose a particular talent as long as he meets the prerequisites of the talent. The entire d20 Core Modern Rulebook class-based talents have been included here for completeness as well as updated to a post-apocalyptic setting where needed.

Charm Every now and again a character has to use his innate talent for being charming and captivating to accomplish his goals.

Charm: When taking this talent, choose a gender (some characters are charming to members of the

opposite gender, others to members of the same gender). The character gets a competence bonus on all Charisma-based skill checks made to influence members of his chosen gender. The amount of this bonus is equal to the character’s level. The character can only charm Overseer controlled NPC characters with attitudes of indifferent or better. The charm bonus cannot be used against characters that are unfriendly or hostile. This ability can be taken more than once (at which point it works on the other gender).

Favor: The character has the ability to acquire minor aid from known acquaintances, allies, or contacts. By making a favor check, the character can gain important information without going through the time and trouble of doing a lot of research. Favors can also be used to acquire the loan of equipment or documents, or to receive other minor assistance in the course of an adventure. A character must spend 1 Karma Point to activate this talent. To make a favor check, roll a d20 and add the character’s level. The Overseer sets the DC based on the scope of the favor being requested. The DC ranges from 10 for a simple favor to as high as 30 for formidable and highly dangerous, expensive, or illegal favors. A character cannot take 10 or 20 on this check, nor can they retry the check for the same (or virtually the same) favor. Favors should help advance the plot of an adventure. A favor that would enable a character to avoid an adventure altogether should always be unavailable to the character, regardless of the result of a favor check. The Overseer should carefully monitor a character’s use of favors to ensure that this ability is not abused. The success or failure of a mission should not hinge on the use of a favor, and getting a favor should not replace good role-playing or the use of other skills. Then again, this is the Wasteland, and a favor can go a long way. The Overseer may disallow any favor deemed to be disruptive to the game. Prerequisite: Charm.

Captivate: The character has the ability to temporarily beguile a target through the use of words and bearing. The target must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher to be susceptible to a captivate attempt, must be within 30 feet of the character, must be flat-footed or not in combat, and must be able to see, hear, and understand the character. To captivate a target, the character must use an attack action and make a Charisma check (DC 15), adding his character level as a bonus. If the Charisma check succeeds, the target can try to resist.

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Section 6: Talents The target resists the captivation attempt by making a Will saving throw (DC 10 + character level + character Cha bonus). If the saving throw fails, the character becomes the target’s sole focus. The target pays no attention to anyone else for 1 round and remains flat-footed. This focusing of the target’s attention allows other characters to take actions of which the captivated target is unaware. The effect ends immediately if the target is attacked or threatened. A character can concentrate to keep a target captivated for additional rounds. The character concentrates all his effort on the task and the target gets to make a new Will save each round. The effect ends when the character stops concentrating, or when the target succeeds on the save. This is a Mind-Affecting ability. Prerequisites: Charm, Favor.

Alluring Gaze: The character can seduce an unknowing NPC that he encounters in a non-combat situation with suggestive gestures and motions on a successful Charisma check. This action counts as a full-round action and is an opposed roll (d20 + character’s level + character’s Cha vs. target’s Sense Motive + target’s level). If the character is the opposite sex of the target he receives a +2 circ*mstance bonus on the check. If the opposed check is successful the target is friendly or if the same sex indifferent, and considerer allured. The target pays no attention to anyone else for the number of rounds equal to the alluring character’s level and remains flat-footed. This focusing of the target’s attention allows other characters to take actions of which the allured target is unaware. The effect ends immediately if the target is attacked or threatened. Prerequisites: Charm, Favor, Captivate.

Damage Reduction The character has an innate talent to ignore a set amount of physical damage (but not damage from environmental effects such as radiation or starvation). Before the character can select a talent from this tree they must have previously selected at least one talent from either of the Energy Resistance or Unbreakable Talent Trees.

Thick Skin (DR 1): The character gains a PDR 1 or increases his existing PDR by +1. Prerequisite: One talent from either of the Energy Resistance or Unbreakable Talent Trees.

Iron Skin (DR 2): The character gains a PDR 2 or increases his existing PDR by +1. Prerequisites: Thick Skin and one other talent from either the Energy Resistance Talent Tree or the Unbreakable Talent Tree.

Stone Skin (DR 3): The character gains a PDR 3 or increases his existing PDR by +1. Prerequisites: Thick Skin, Iron Skin, and one other talent from either the Energy Resistance Talent Tree or the Unbreakable Talent Tree.

Defensive The character has improved their overall defense by practice at avoiding attacks that could cause them bodily harm.

Evasion: If the character is exposed to any effect that normally allows a character to attempt a Reflex saving throw for half damage, the character suffers no damage if he makes a successful saving throw. Evasion can only be used when wearing light armor or no armor.

Uncanny Dodge 1: The character retains his Dexterity bonus to Defense regardless of being

caught flat-footed or struck by a hidden attacker (the character still loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense if the hero is immobilized). Prerequisite: Evasion.

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Uncanny Dodge 2: The character can no longer be flanked and can react to opponents on opposite sides of him as easily as he can react to a single attacker. Prerequisites: Evasion, Uncanny Dodge 1.

Defensive Roll: The character can roll with a potentially lethal attack to take less damage from it. When the character would be reduced to 0 hit points or less by damage in combat from a physical attack, the character can attempt to roll with the damage. A character spends 1 Karma Point to use this talent. Once the point is spent, the hero makes a Reflex saving throw (DC = damage dealt). If the save succeeds, he takes only half damage. The character must be able to react to the attack to execute a defensive roll—if the hero is immobilized, he cannot use this talent. Since this effect would not normally allow a character to make a Reflex save for half damage, the Evasion talent does not apply to the defensive roll. Prerequisites: Evasion, Uncanny Dodge 1.

Opportunist: The character can spend 1 Karma Point to use this talent. Once this point is spent the hero

can make an attack of opportunity against an opponent who has just been struck for damage in melee by another character. This attack counts as the character’s attack of opportunity for that round. Even a character with the Combat Reflexes feat cannot use this talent more than once per round. Prerequisite: Evasion.

Empathic A few characters possess a great capacity for empathy as one of their innate talents.

Empathy: The character has a knack for being sensitive to the feelings and thoughts of others even if they are not communicated explicitly manner. Empathy provides a bonus on checks involving interaction skills (Bluff, Diplomacy, Handle Animal, Intimidate, Perform, and Sense Motive), provided the character spends at least 1 minute observing his target prior to making the skill check. The bonus is equal to the character’s level.

Improved Aid Another: The character’s bonus on attempts to aid another increases by +1 on a successful Aid Another check. This talent can be selected multiple times, each time increasing the bonus by +1. Prerequisite: Empathy.

Intuition: The character has an innate ability to sense trouble in the air. A number of times per day equal to the character's level he can make a Will saving throw (DC 15). On a successful save, the character gets either a positive or negative feeling about his immediate circ*mstances based on the Overseer’s judgment of the situation. Prerequisite: Empathy.

Energy Resistance This character is particularly resistant to certain kinds of deadly energy effects. These talents can be selected in any order.

Acid Resistance: The character ignores an amount of acid damage equal to his Constitution modifier.

Cold Resistance: The character ignores an amount of cold damage equal to his Constitution modifier.

Electricity Resistance: The character ignores an amount of electricity damage equal to his Constitution modifier.

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Section 6: Talents Fire Resistance: The character ignores an amount of fire damage equal to his Constitution modifier. Radiation Resistance: The character ignores an amount of Radiation damage equal to his Constitution modifier x100 in Rad units (see Radiation effects in Chapter 5).

Sonic Resistance: The character ignores an amount of sonic damage equal to his Constitution modifier.

Extreme Effort The character can push himself to the extreme. The effort must relate either to a Strength check or a Strength-based skill check, and the character must decide to use this ability before making the check.

Extreme Effort: The effort requires a full-round action and provides a +2 bonus on the check. Improved Extreme Effort: The effort requires a full-round action and provides a +2 bonus that stacks with the bonus provided by extreme effort (+4 total). Prerequisite: Extreme Effort.

Advanced Extreme Effort: The effort requires a full-round action and provides a +2 bonus that stacks with the bonuses provided by extreme effort and improved extreme effort (+6 total). Prerequisites: Extreme Effort, Improved Extreme Effort.

Fast-Talk Some characters have an innate talent for bending the truth or dazzling others with a combination of words, mannerisms, and charm.

Fast-Talk: The character has a way with words when attempting to con and deceive. With this talent, he applies his character level as a competence bonus on any Bluff, Diplomacy, or Gamble checks that the hero makes while attempting to lie, cheat, or otherwise bend the truth.

Dazzle: The character has the ability to dazzle a target through sheer force of personality, a winning smile, and fast-talking during combat. The target must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher to be susceptible to a dazzle attempt, must be within 30 feet of the character, and must be able to see, hear, and understand the character.

To dazzle a target, the character must use an attack action and make a Charisma check (DC 15), adding his character level as a bonus. If the Charisma check succeeds, the target can try to resist. The target resists the dazzle attempt by making a Will saving throw (DC 10 + character’s level + character’s Cha bonus). If the save fails, the target receives a –1 penalty on attack rolls, ability checks, skill checks, and saving throws for a number of rounds equal to the character’s level. This talent can be selected multiple times, each time compounding the dazzled penalty by –1. This is a Mind-Affecting ability. Prerequisite: Fast-Talk.

Smooth Talker: The character has perfected the subtle art of manipulation and only the most

experienced adversaries are immune to his technique. When attempting a Bluff or Diplomacy check against an NPC who has 4 or fewer Hit Dice than the character, the character may choose to spend at least 5 minutes in conversation with that NPC in order to “take 20” rather than rolling. Prerequisite: Fast-Talk

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Silver Tongue: The character knows how to learn from his mistakes and smooth over a tough situation when trying to negotiate. When the character fails a Diplomacy check, he may make a second Diplomacy check at –4 to amend the failed action. This talent may only be used once per failed Diplomacy check. Prerequisites: Fast-Talk, Smooth Talker

Taunt: The character has the ability to temporarily rattle a target through the use of insults and goading. The target must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher to be susceptible to a taunt, must be within 30 feet of the character, and must be able to hear and understand the character. To taunt a target, the character must use an attack action and make a Charisma check (DC 15), adding his character level as a bonus. If the Charisma check succeeds, the target can try to resist. The target resists the taunt by making a Will saving throw (DC 10 + character’s level + character’s Cha bonus). If the save fails, the target becomes dazed (unable to act, but can defend normally) for 1 round. A taunt can be performed against an opponent any number of times. This is a Mind-Affecting ability. Prerequisites: Fast-Talk, Dazzle.

Gunslinger The Wasteland is a dangerous place and the character often finds himself having to exchange lead with raiders or to exterminate a nest of creatures.

Gunslinger: Firearms are second nature for the character and he receives a +1 attack bonus with guns usable with the personal firearm feat.

Pistoleer: The character has perfected his shot and become exceedingly precise with a firearm. The character ignores two points of Damage Reduction from his target’s armor (PDR). Prerequisite: Gunslinger

Machine Gun Johnny: The character receives the Advanced Firearms Proficiency feat. Prerequisites: Pistoleer

Hand to Hand The character knows how to fight when he is only got his own body available, and that will go a long way in the Wasteland whether he has had formal training or not.

Strong Attack: The character has learned how to throw a punch or kick that will rattle his opponent's teeth. His unarmed attacks deal 1d6 points of lethal or non-lethal damage. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Brawl

Hammer Attack: The character swings his fist or a leg in a hammer-like motion that deals 1d8 points of lethal or non-lethal damage. Prerequisites: Strength 15, Brawl, Strong Attack

Haymaker Attack: Also known as a 'knock-out punch or sweet chin music', the character winds up and deliver a powerful attack that deals 1d10 points of lethal or non-lethal damage. Prerequisites: Strength 17, Brawl, Strong Attack, Hammer Attack

Fisticuffs: The character knows how to carry himself in a bare-knuckle brawl. He receives a +1 attack bonus when making unarmed attacks, or with simple weapons that fit over the hands such as boxing gloves or brass knuckles.

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Section 6: Talents Pugilist: The character has learned how to hit where it will hurt the most. His threat range when using unarmed attacks or simple weapons designed to augment unarmed attacks increases in range by one (20 become 19-20, 19-20 becomes 18-20, and so on.) Prerequisite: Fisticuffs

Healing The character has learned how to patch up himself and his companions.

Healing Knack: The character has a knack for the healing arts. The character receives a +2 bonus on all Treat Injury skill checks.

Healing Touch 1: The character’s ability to restore damage with a medical kit or perform surgery with a surgery kit increases by +2 hit points. Prerequisite: Healing Knack.

Healing Touch 2: The character’s ability to restore damage with a medical kit or perform surgery with a surgery kit increases by +2 hit points, which stacks with healing touch 1 for a total of +4 hit points. Prerequisites: Healing Knack, Healing touch 1.

Field Medic: The character has refined his healing capabilities to the point where he can get a wounded comrade back on her feet in the midst of combat. He may make a Treat Injury check to restore 1d4 points of damage to a comrade who is at 0 or fewer hit points. Prerequisites: Healing Knack, Healing Touch 1, Healing Touch 2.

Ignore Hardness The character has a talent for finding weaknesses in objects. This allows the character to ignore some of an object’s hardness when making a melee attack against it.

Ignore Hardness: The character ignores 2 points of an object’s hardness. Improved Ignore Hardness: The character ignores 2 additional points of an object’s hardness (for a total of 4).

Prerequisite: Ignore Hardness.

Advanced Ignore Hardness: The character ignores 2 additional points of an object’s hardness (for a total of 6). Prerequisites: Ignore Hardness, Improved Ignore Hardness.

Increased Speed The character has learned that quick people survive more often than slower ones and has trained to increase his agility.

Increased Speed: The character’s base speed increases by 5 feet. Improved Increased Speed: The character’s base speed increases by 5 feet. This talent stacks with Increased Speed (10 feet total). Prerequisite: Increased Speed.

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Advanced Increased Speed: The character’s base speed increases by 5 feet. This talent stacks with Increased Speed and Improved Increased Speed (15 feet total). Prerequisites: Increased Speed, Improved Increased Speed.

Insightful The character has learned to focus on subtle clues in his environment to get a better judge of his surroundings.

Skill Emphasis: The character chooses a single skill to receive a +3 bonus on all skill checks with. This bonus does not allow the character to make checks for a trained-only skill if the character has no ranks in the skill.

Aware: The character is intuitively aware of his surroundings. The character adds his base Will saving throw bonus to Listen or Spot checks to avoid surprise. Prerequisite: Skill Emphasis (Spot or Listen).

Faith: The character has a great deal of faith in something whether it is himself, a higher power, or both. This unswerving belief allows the character to add his Wisdom modifier to the die roll whenever the character spends 1 Karma Point to improve the result of an attack roll, skill check, saving throw, or ability check. Prerequisite: Skill Emphasis (Knowledge: philosophy and theology).

Cool Under Pressure: The character selects a number of skills equal to 3 + the character’s Wisdom modifier. When making a check with one of these skills, the character can take 10 even when distracted or under duress. Prerequisite: Skill Emphasis (any) plus either Faith or Aware.

Leadership The character has a knack for taking charge and inspiriting others.

Coordinate: The character can spend a full round directing his allies to make a Charisma check (DC 10). If successful the character provides any of his allies within 30 feet a +1 tactical bonus on their attack rolls and skill checks. The bonus lasts for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Charisma modifier. The character can coordinate a number of allies equal to one-half his character level, rounded down (to a minimum of one ally).

Inspiration: The character can inspire his allies, bolstering them and improving their chances of success. An ally must listen to and observe the character for a full round for the inspiration to take hold, and the character must make a successful Charisma check (DC 10). The effect lasts for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Charisma modifier. An inspired ally gains a +2 morale bonus on saving throws, attack rolls, and damage rolls. A character cannot inspire himself. The character can inspire a number of allies equal to one-half his character level, rounded down (to a minimum of one ally). Prerequisite: Coordinate.

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Section 6: Talents Greater Inspiration: The character can inspire his allies to even greater heights, bolstering them and

improving their chances of success. An ally must listen to and observe the character for a full round for the greater inspiration to take hold, and the character must make a Charisma check (DC 10). The effect lasts for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Charisma modifier. An inspired ally gains an additional +1 morale bonus on saving throws, attack rolls, and damage rolls, which stacks with the bonus from inspiration for a total of a +3 morale bonus. A character cannot inspire himself. The character can inspire a number of allies equal to one-half his Charismatic level, rounded down (to a minimum of one ally). Prerequisites: Coordinate, Inspiration.

Martial Arts More organized styles of fighting are known as Martial Arts, and a character who has learned them will be respected as much as he is feared by those who know his reputation. The character’s martial arts unarmed attacks count as armed, which means that opponents do not get attacks of opportunity when the character attacks them unarmed. The character may make attacks of opportunity against opponents who provoke such attacks.

Karate: The character’s hands and feet are quick and he can throw quick strikes at his opponent that deal 1d6 points of lethal or non-lethal damage. This talent may be taken a second time for 1d8 points of damage and a third time for 1d10 points of damage. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Defensive Martial Arts

Judo: The character has mastered the art of the grapple, gaining a +4 bonus to grapple attacks and escape artist attempts. Danielson, you are now ready to take on Sumo. Prerequisites: Dexterity 15, Defensive Martial Arts, Karate

Kendo: The character has mastered the art of the Martial Art weapon. When using a spear, staff or sword the character gains a +1 bonus to hit and damage, the weapon critical threat modifier increases by 1 point (20 becomes 19-20, 19-20 becomes 18-20, and so on), and the character gains a defense bonus of +1 when wielding the weapon with two hands. Prerequisites: Dexterity 17, Defensive Martial Arts, Karate, Judo

Melee Smash The character has learned that brute strength is not the only way to deal some extra damage.

Melee Smash: The character receives a +1 bonus on melee damage. Improved Melee Smash: The character receives an additional +1 bonus on melee damage (+2 total). Prerequisite: Melee Smash.

Advanced Melee Smash: The character receives an additional +1 bonus on melee damage (+3 total). Prerequisites: Melee Smash, Improved Melee Smash.

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Mr. Handy Who needs a repair manual? When it comes to fixing thing, those RoboCore sentry robots don’t have anything on you.

Mechanic: With the rusted remains of vehicles and other broken mechanical devices commonplace, it is inevitable that some characters will tinker. These characters have above-average mechanical aptitude and receive a bonus to Repair checks equal to the character’s level.

Mr. Goodwrench: The character is exceptionally skilled at fixing things as quickly as possible, even under adverse conditions. When making a Repair check the character can take 10 even when distracted or under duress. Prerequisite: Mechanic

Quicker than the Eye Disappearing in a mob or from a scene of a crime is helpful to those that need to. Now you see me, now you don’t. You are the Master of Disguise and a Trickster.

Matchstick Man: The character can use the Perform skill to distract opponents, leaving them vulnerable to further trickery. He can make a Perform skill check (performance skills that require instruments or props still require those accouterments) to dazzle a single target that is not currently engaged in combat. A successful check means the target gets a penalty equal to the character’s level to any Spot check rolls against the character for a number of rounds equal to the character’s level.

Magician: The character has mastered magic tricks, like making a coin or other small object disappear. He receives a bonus to Bluff and Sleight of Hand skill checks equal to the character’s level when performing Sleight of Hand tricks.

Quick Disguise: The character has mastered the arts of disappearing quickly into a crowd and improvising disguises. When making a Disguise or Hide check, the character can take 10—even when distracted or under duress. Prerequisite: Matchstick Man

Research This character has a natural aptitude for studying and fact-finding. These talents can be selected in any order.

Savant: Select one of the skills listed in the following paragraph. The character must have ranks

in the skill if it is Trained Only. The character gets to add a bonus equal to his level when making checks with that skill. A character can take this talent multiple times; each time it applies to a different skill. Computer Use, Craft (any single skill), Decipher Script, Demolitions, Disable Device, Forgery, Investigate, Knowledge (any single skill), Navigate, Repair, Research, Search.

Linguist: With this talent, the character becomes a master linguist. Whenever the character encounters a new language, either spoken or written, that he does not know the character can make an Intelligence check to determine if he can understand it. The check is made with a bonus equal to the character’s level. For a written language, the bonus applies to a Decipher Script check instead. The DC for the check depends on the situation: DC 15 if the language is in the same group as a language the character has as a Read/Write Language or Speak Language skill; DC 20 if the language is unrelated to any other languages the character knows; and DC 25 if the language is ancient or unique. With this special ability, a

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Section 6: Talents character can glean enough meaning from a conversation or document to ascertain the basic message, but this ability in no way simulates actually being able to converse or fluently read and write in a given language. A single check covers roughly one minute of a spoken language or one page of a written language. Prerequisite: At least 1 rank in either Read/Write Language or Speak Language for each of three different languages.

Scientist With so much pre-War technology lying around, contrasted by the relatively small number of people who know how to use it, those who follow their curiosity and pursue cerebral knowledge can find themselves in demand.

Chemist: The character understands the chemical properties of elements and compounds, and how best to combine them for a certain effect. He receives a +2 bonus to all Craft (Chemical) checks. Prerequisite: Intelligence 15

Mr. Bunsen Burner: The character has refined the art of chemical creation to the point where he can create substances with ease. He receives a +3 bonus (for a total of +5) to all Craft (Chemical) checks. Prerequisites: Intelligence 15, Chemist.

Spontaneous Fighting The Wasteland is a dangerous place and the character often finds himself having to grab a blade, club, or chair to protect himself with if firearms are unavailable or unfeasible.

Blades: The character knows how to use bladed weapons in combat, whether a dull knife or an oriental sword. He deals an additional +1d4 point of damage when fighting with bladed weapons.

Improvised Weapon: The character can use his environment as a weapon—chair legs become clubs,

broken Toxicola bottles become knives, and pieces of metal become shivs. The character can improvise a weapon out of nearly anything, creating a small, simple melee weapon that does damage of an appropriate type (see Improvised Weapons in Chapter 4) and threatens a critical hit on a 20. Additionally, the character does not suffer the normal –4 penalty to attacks with these improvised weapons.

Stealth Discretion can often be the better part of valor, and many characters have learned that sneaking around can often yield better results than barging in guns blazing.

Locksmith: With the proper tools and a dose of knowledge, any lock can be foiled. The character receives a +2 bonus to Pick Locks and Disable Device rolls involving mechanical, non-electronic locks. The Shadow: The character does not just blend into the shadows, he becomes part of them. He receives a bonus on Hide skill checks equal to his character level. Prerequisites: Dexterity 15

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Whisper on the Wind: The character makes little to no noise and receives a bonus on Move Silently skill checks equal to his character level. Prerequisites: Dexterity 15

Exploit Flaw: The character has been in enough scrapes to know which parts of his enemies are the weakest and how to take advantage of that when he has the upper hand. When flanking an opponent (as detailed in Chapter 5), the character adds an additional 1d6 points of damage on each successful melee attack against that opponent. Prerequisites: The Shadow, Whisper on the Wind.

Improved Exploit Flaw: The character is even better at exploiting advantages in melee combat. When flanking an opponent (as detailed in Chapter 5), the character adds an additional 1d6 (for a total of 2d6) points of damage with each successful melee attack against his opponent. Prerequisites: Exploit Flaw, The Shadow, Whisper on the Wind.

Strategy The character has the brainpower to see solutions for most situations. These talents can be selected in any order, but before the character can select a talent from this tree he must have previously selected at least one talent from the Research Talent Tree.

Exploit Weakness: After 1 round of combat, the character can designate one opponent and try to find ways to gain an advantage by using brains over brawn. The character uses a move action and makes an Intelligence check (DC 15) with a bonus equal to his character level. If the check succeeds, for the rest of the combat the character uses his Intelligence bonus instead of either Strength or Dexterity bonus on attack rolls. The character then finds ways to out-think his opponent and notices weaknesses in his opponent’s fighting style. Prerequisite: One talent from the Research Talent Tree.

Plan: Prior to an encounter the character can develop a plan of action to handle the situation. Using this talent requires preparation; a character cannot use this talent when surprised or otherwise unprepared for a particular situation. Creating a plan requires 1 minute. After creating the plan the character makes an Intelligence check (DC 10) with a bonus equal to his character level. The result of the check provides the character and allies with a circ*mstance bonus. A character cannot take 10 or 20 when making this check. This bonus can be applied to all skill checks and attack rolls made by the character and his allies, but the bonus only lasts for the first 3 rounds after making Check Result Bonus the plan. After that time, reduce the bonus by 1 point (to a 9 or lower +0 (check failed) minimum of +0) for every additional round the situation 10–14 +1 continues, as the vagaries of circ*mstance begin to unravel 15–24 +2 even the best-laid plans. 25 or higher +3 Prerequisite: One talent from the Research Talent Tree.

Trick: The character has the ability to temporarily confuse a target through the use of ploy and deception. The target must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher to be susceptible to a trick, must be within 30 feet of the character, and must be able to hear and understand the character. To trick a target, the character must use a full-round action and make an Intelligence check (DC 15), adding his character level as a bonus. If the Intelligence check succeeds, the target can try to think quickly and ignore the trick.

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Section 6: Talents The target resists the trick by making a Will saving throw (DC 10 + character’s level + character’s Int bonus). If the saving throw fails, the target becomes dazed (unable to act, but can defend normally) for 1 round. A trick can only be used against a particular target once per encounter. After the first trick in an encounter, whether the attempt succeeds or not, that target becomes wary and immune to such ploys. This is a MindAffecting ability. Prerequisite: One talent from the Research Talent Tree.

Survival Wandering the Wasteland is not just a job – it is a way of life. Some characters can find paths, water, or food in places where others would become just another exposure casualty.

Skilled Hunter: The character knows exactly what animals and plants in the Wasteland are edible, and how to catch them. Rats may not taste like much, but they can keep you alive. The character can make a Survival check (DC 12) to find and prepare enough food and drinkable water for himself for one day. For each +3 that the check succeeds by, the character can provide enough additional food and water for one additional character. Dowsing Rod: The character has an uncanny ability to find sources of water in the Wastes; though, whether or not the water will be clean enough to drink is not guaranteed. He can make a Survival check (DC 15) to locate an outdoors or underground source of natural water.

Camouflage: The character has learned the particulars of Wasteland terrain enough to blend in with ease. When in the Wasteland (away from settlements), the character may substitute his Survival skill for his Hide skill when making any Hide skill checks. Beast Soother: The character has dealt with enough animals, whether mutated or not, to know how to calm them down. He may make a Handle Animal check (DC 20) to change a non-intelligent (Int 2 or lower) hostile creature's attitude to neutral. This ability does not work on vermin. Prerequisites: Any two other Survival Boy talents.

Ambush Bug: The character knows exactly how to set– and avoid –ambushes. When he sets an ambush, the target receives a –4 penalty on all Spot skill checks to avoid noticing it; likewise, the Character receives a +4 bonus on all Spot rolls to avoid an ambush set by someone else. Prerequisites: Any two other Survival Boy talents.

Pathfinder: The character knows the Wasteland like the back of his hand. He receives a bonus equal to his character level on all Survival checks related to his rate of travel in the Wastes thanks to his skill at locating paths and shortcuts unknown even to the local fauna.

Unbreakable Characters with these talents are particularly resilient and tough.

Remain Conscious: The character gains the ability to continue to perform actions when he would otherwise be considered unconscious and dying. When the character’s hit points reach – 1, the character can perform as though he were disabled, making either an attack action or a move action every round until the character reaches –10 hit points (and dies) or the character’s hit points return to 1 or higher. The character can choose to succumb to unconsciousness if he thinks that doing so might prevent him from taking more damage.

Robust: The character becomes especially robust, gaining a number of hit points equal to his character level as soon as he selects this talent. Thereafter, the character gains +1 additional hit point with each level he gains.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Second Wind: The character can spend 1 Karma Point to gain a second wind as a free action. When the character does this, he recovers a number of hit points equal to his Constitution modifier. This talent does not increase the character’s hit points beyond the character’s full normal total.

Stamina: The character recovers twice as fast as normal. He recovers 2 hit points per character level per evening of rest, 2 points of temporary ability damage per evening of rest, and awakens in half the normal time after being knocked unconscious.

Section 7: Reputation Characters in the Exodus World gain reputation through their actions, good and bad. Every actions has a consequence, and a character’s Reputation is the measure of these consequences. Reputation is measured in percentiles (d%) with a maximum of 100% in two categories, Fame and Infamy. Each major region, city, faction, organization, and race (sentient non- or sub-human races) possesses a category of reputation, each with a fame and infamy category. Ultimately it is up to the Overseer to decide how detailed he wants to make reputation.

Fame Fame is the accomplishments and deeds done in the name of good to better life in the Wasteland, whether it is done knowingly or accidentally. The Overseer awards fame points when a character successfully completes a goal or mission.

Infamy

Fame Successful Mission with moderate casualties or property damage Successful Mission with minor casualties or property damage Successful Mission with no casualties or property damage Negotiating a peace treaty Eradicating a faction1

+2% +3% +1% +3%

1 The character gains the same amount of fame in infamy points from the

surviving faction members and parent organization.

Infamy is earned by several means similar to gaining fame. Most infamy is earned Infamy through negative actions toward the good Mission Failure or innocent folk of the Wastes, betrayals, Betrayal of a client/organization1 and devastating failure of a mission. Special Note: Infamy in the same category of fame decreases the fame score by ½ of the infamy points earned (round down to a minimum of 1).

Point Awarded +1%

Catastrophic Mission Failure Killing an innocent bystander Eradicating a faction1

Point Awarded +2% +5% +3% +1% +3%

1 The character gains the same amount of fame as infamy points earned from opposing

organizations of the faction.

Example Reputation Categories: A Wasteland Settlement (a particular settlement or area) Crime Syndicate (a particular syndicate) Desert Rangers Steel Disciples Ghūls Trans-Genetic Mutants NEMO (New Era of Mexican Order)

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Skills

Chapter II Skills Skills are as valuable in the Wasteland as money was before the Great War. A good set of skills are required in the Wasteland if you wish to survive the harsh climates that make up the new world—not to mention evils of men and mutants. Skills can be used to get out of trouble, recall lore, repair things, perform physical activities, and much more.

Skill Basics Getting Skills At each level, a character gets skill points that are used to buy skill ranks (unless the character has a negative skill point modifier which results in 0 or below). The character’s class and Intelligence modifier determine the number of points received. If the character buys a class skill, he gets 1 rank in the skill for each skill point spent. If the character buys a cross-class skill, he gets ½ rank per skill point. The maximum rank in a class skill is equal to character level +3; however, there is an exception to the TAG skills the character chooses, in which case, they are equal to character level +5. The maximum rank in a cross-class skill is one-half of this number.

Using Skills To make a skill check, roll: 1d20 + skill modifier (Skill modifier = skill ranks + ability modifier + miscellaneous modifiers)

Skill Ranks: A character’s rank in a skill is based on the number of skill points the character has invested in the skill. Some skills can be used even if the character has no ranks in the skill; doing this is known as making an untrained skill check. Ability Modifier: The ability modifier used in the skill check is the modifier for the skill’s key ability (the ability associated with the skill’s use). The key ability of a skill is noted in its Description.

Miscellaneous Modifiers: Miscellaneous modifiers include bonuses provided by feats and class features, and penalties such as the ones associated with the non-proficient use of armor, among others.

Acquiring Skill Ranks Ranks indicate how much training or experience a character has with a given skill. Each skill has a number of ranks, from 0 (for a Skill Points per Level skill in which a character has no Class 1st Level Skill Points Higher Level Skill training at all) to 23 (for a 20th-level Points character who has increased a class Aggressive (2 + Int modifier) x4 2 + Int modifier skill to its maximum rank). Tag Defensive (4 + Int modifier) x4 4 + Int modifier skills, however, can max out at Custom (varies + Int modifier) x4 X + Int modifier 25. When making a skill check, a character adds his skill ranks to the roll as part of the skill modifier. The rules assume that a character can always find a way to learn any skill. Still, the Overseer can impose limits depending on circ*mstances and a given situation.

Skill Checks Unlike with attack rolls and saving throws, a natural roll of 20 on the d20 is not an automatic success when making a skill check and a natural roll of 1 is not an automatic failure.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Difficulty Class

Some checks are made against a Difficulty Class (DC). The DC is a number set by the Overseer (using the skill rules as a guideline) that a character must attain to succeed.

Opposed Checks Some skill checks are opposed checks. They are made against a randomized number— usually another character’s skill check result.

Difficulty Class Examples Difficulty (DC) Example (Skill Used) Very easy (0) Notice something large in plain sight (Spot) Easy (5) Climb a knotted rope (Climb) Average (10) Hear an approaching security guard (Listen) Tough (15) Disarm an explosive (Demolitions) Challenging (20) Swim against a strong current (Swim) Formidable (25) Fix a broken firearm (Repair) Heroic (30) Leap across a 30-foot chasm (Jump) Convince the city guards that you’re a citizen even though Super Heroic (35) you are not wearing an citizen’s ID badge and are not on their list, they should let you into the city (Bluff) Nearly Impossible Hack into a Military AI computer to shut down defensive (40+) operations (Computer Use)

For ties on opposed checks, the character with the higher key ability score wins. If those scores are the same, roll again.

Trying Again

Opposed Checks Examples Task Sneak up on someone Con someone Hide from someone Win a Bison hauler race Pretend to be someone else Steal a key chain

Skill Move Silently Bluff Hide Drive Disguise Sleight of Hand

Opposing Skill Listen Sense Motive Spot Drive Spot Spot

If a character fails on a skill check, he can sometimes try again. Check the skill Description to find out if, and under what circ*mstances, a character may try again. Many skills, however, have natural consequences for failing that must be taken into account. Some skills cannot be tried again once a check has failed for a particular task. If the use of a skill carries no penalty for failure, a character can take 20 and assume that he keeps trying until he eventually succeeds.

Untrained Skill Checks Generally, if a character attempts to use a skill in which he does not have any ranks, the character makes a skill check as described. The character’s skill modifier does not include skill ranks because the character does not have any. The character does get other modifiers, though, such as the ability modifier for the skill’s key ability. Some skills can be used only if the character is trained in the skill.

Favorable and Unfavorable Conditions Some situations may make a skill easier or harder to use, resulting in a bonus or penalty to the skill modifier or a change to the skill check’s DC. The Overseer can alter the odds of success in four ways to take into account exceptional circ*mstances: 1. Give the skill user a +2 circ*mstance bonus to represent conditions that improve performance, such as having the perfect tool for the job, getting help from another character, or working under conditions that are significantly better than normal. 2. Give the skill user a –2 circ*mstance penalty to represent conditions that hamper performance, such as being forced to use improvised tools, or possessing misleading information. 3. Reduce the DC by 2 to represent circ*mstances that make the task easier, such as having a friendly audience when making a Perform check, or searching for information on an extremely well documented topic with a Computer Use check.

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Skills 4. Increase the DC by 2 to represent circ*mstances that make the task harder, such as making a Perform check in front of a hostile audience, or searching for information on a very poorly documented topic with a Computer Use check. Conditions that affect a character’s ability to perform the skill change the character’s skill modifier. Conditions that modify how well the character must perform the skill to succeed change the DC. A bonus on a character’s skill modifier or a reduction in the DC of the check has the same result—they create a better chance for success. But they represent different circ*mstances, and sometimes that difference is important.

Time and Skill Checks

Using a skill might take a round, several rounds, or even longer. It might take no time at all. Specific types of actions define how long activities take to perform within the framework of a combat round (6 seconds) and how movement is treated with respect to the activity. See the skill Description for specifics on how long a skill takes to use. In general, using a skill that requires concentration while in close combat is dangerous. Nearby opponents can make attacks of opportunity against a character when he lets his guard down.

Tools

Some skill applications require the use of tools. If tools are needed, the specific items required are mentioned in the skill Description. If the character does not have the appropriate tools, he can still attempt to use the skill, but the character takes a –4 penalty on his check. A character may be able to put together some impromptu tools to make the check. If the Overseer allows it, reduce the penalty to –2 (instead of –4) for using impromptu tools. It usually takes some time (several minutes to an hour or more) to collect or create a set of impromptu tools, and it may require a skill check as well.

Checks without Rolls

A skill check represents an attempt to accomplish some goal, usually in the face of time pressure or distraction. Sometimes, though, a character can use a skill under more favorable conditions and eliminate the luck factor.

Automatic Success When a character has a high enough skill to exceed or meet the DC of a skill check minus 1, then no skill check roll is needed, as the character automatically succeeds in the task.

Taking 10 When a character is not being threatened or distracted, he may choose to take 10 instead of rolling 1d20 for the skill check. Calculate the result as if the character had rolled a 10 (an average roll on a d20). Distractions and threats make it impossible for a character to take 10. A character also cannot take 10 when using a skill untrained or using a skill without ranks, though the Overseer may allow exceptions for truly routine activities.

Taking 20

When a character has plenty of time, is faced with no threats or distractions, and the skill being attempted carries no penalty for failure, a character can take 20 instead of rolling 1d20 for the skill check. Calculate the result as if the character had rolled a 20. Taking 20 is a solution for many difficult tasks and takes 20 times longer to perform the skill than listed time in the skill Description.

Aiding Another

In some situations, characters can cooperate to accomplish a given task. One character is designated as the leader in the effort, while the others try to aid the character in his efforts. A

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 character aids another by making a skill check (DC 10). If the check succeeds, the character’s ally gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to apply to his skill check to complete the task. In many cases, a character’s help will not be beneficial, or only a limited number of characters can help at the same time. The Overseer limits Aid Another attempts as he sees fit for the conditions.

Skill Synergy

Sometimes, the Overseer may decide that having one skill provides a bonus when a character uses another skill in certain situations. The character must have at least 5 ranks in the related skill to gain this synergy bonus, and the Overseer must agree that the two skills can complement each other in the given situation. In such cases, the character receives a +2 synergy bonus on the skill check.

Ability Checks

Sometimes a character tries to do something to Ability Check Examples Key Ability which no specific skill applies. In these cases, Forcing open a jammed or locked door Strength the character makes an Ability check: Roll 1d20 Tying a rope Dexterity and apply the appropriate ability modifier. The Holding one’s breath Constitution Navigating a maze Intelligence Overseer assigns a DC, or sets up an Opposed Recognize a stranger you’ve seen before Wisdom check when two characters are engaged in a Getting yourself noticed in a crowd Charisma contest using one ability against another. In some cases, a test of one’s ability does not involve luck. When two characters arm wrestle, for example, the stronger character simply wins. In the case of identical scores, make opposed Strength checks.

Modifier Types and Stacking

A modifier provides a bonus (a positive modifier) or a penalty (a negative modifier) to a die roll. Bonuses with specific descriptors, such as “equipment bonus,” generally do not stack (combine for cumulative effect) with others of the same type. In those cases, only the best bonus of that type applies. There are a few specific bonuses that do stack as denoted on the chart above, as well as any bonus without a descriptor (such as simply a “+1 bonus”) stacks with other bonuses. All penalties stack, regardless of their descriptors.

Bonus Type Chemical Circ*mstance Competence Cover Dodge Equipment Morale Natural Armor Size Synergy

Stackable Maybe 1 Maybe 2 No No Yes No No No No Yes

1 Some Chemical bonuses stack, see

Skill Descriptions Skills are presented in alphabetical order in the following format. Entries that do not apply to a particular skill are omitted in that skill’s Description.

individual chemical description. 2 Circ*mstance bonuses only stack if the circ*mstances are different then the other.

Skill Description Format Skill Name (Key Ability) Trained Only; Armor Penalty The skill name line and the line beneath it include the following information:

Key Ability: The abbreviation for the ability whose modifier applies to the skill check. Exceptions: Speak Language and Read/Write Language have “None” given as their key ability, because the use of these skills never requires a check.

Trained Only: If “Trained Only” appears on the line beneath the skill name, a character must have at least 1 rank in the skill to use it. If “Trained Only” is omitted, the skill can be used untrained. If any particular notes apply to trained or untrained use, they are covered in the Special section (see below).

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Skills Armor Penalty: If “Armor Penalty” appears on the line beneath the skill name, apply the armor penalty for the armor the character is wearing to checks involving this skill.

Check: What a character can do with a successful skill check, and the check’s DC. Try Again?: Any conditions that apply to repeated attempts to use the skill for a particular purpose. If this

entry is omitted, the skill check can be tried again without any inherent penalty other than taking additional time.

Special: Any particular notes that apply, such as whether a character can take 10 or take 20 when using the skill.

Untrained: Any details about using a skill untrained. If this entry does not appear, it means the skill

works the same even when used untrained; or, that an untrained character cannot make checks with this skill (true for skills that are designated “Trained Only”).

Time: How much time it takes to make a check with this skill.

Balance (Dex)

Armor Penalty

When you join that traveling circus and walk the tightrope, balance will come in handy. Balance allows one to maintain his footing on narrow and slick surfaces. Check: The character can walk on a precarious surface. A successful check lets the character move at half his speed along the surface as a move Narrow Surface DC 1 Difficult Surface DC action. A failure indicates that the 7–12 in. wide 10 Uneven or angled 10 character spends his move action keeping 2–6 in. wide 15 Slippery surface 10 his balance and does not move. A failure Less than 2 in. wide 20 1 Add +5 to the DC if the narrow surface is slippery or angled; add +10 if it is both by 5 or more indicates that the character slippery and angled. falls. The difficulty varies with the conditions of the surface. Being Attacked While Balancing While balancing, the character is flat-footed (the character loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense, if the character has one), unless the character has 5 or more ranks in Balance. If the character takes damage, he must make a Balance check again to remain standing. Accelerated Movement The character can try to cross a precarious surface more quickly than normal. The character can move his full speed, as a move action but the character takes a –5 penalty on his Balance check. (Moving twice the character’s speed in a round requires two checks, one for each move action.) The character can attempt to charge across a precarious surface. Charging requires one Balance check at a –5 penalty for each multiple of the character’s speed (or fraction thereof) that the character charges. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Balance check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Focused feat gets a +2 bonus on all Balance checks. Time: Balancing while moving one-half the character’s speed is a move action.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Barter (Cha) “I’ll trade you my sister for that Super Sledge, some Med Packs, and some Vigoroids!” You can attempt to haggle down the cost of items or services in the Wasteland or to bargain for a better price when selling goods. Check: This skill is an opposed Barter vs. Barter skill check. For every 5 points that you beat your target’s Barter skill check roll, you reduce the buying cost of the item by 10% to a maximum of 50%; or, increase the selling piece by the same amount based off the original sold value (which is half cost). (Remember that sold items are sold at half cost, and this does not necessarily mean this is book price). The Barter skill cannot be used to buy and immediately sell a merchant back his merchandise that was just purchased to make a profit (a few days must past first). The merchant will buy the merchandise back at a half cost of his original selling price to the character or characters. After a few days have passed, the merchant will forget about the character’s purchase. Example: Weston, a 4th level Defensive character, barters with a merchant. They make opposed Barter skill checks and Weston beats the merchant’s check by 10. Weston now can buy goods at a 20% discount or sell goods at a 20% higher price. Weston is selling some brass knuckles (original cost 40, sells at 20, 20 plus 20% equals 24 sell price) and receives 24 coins for the sell.

Special: A character with 5 ranks of Profession (Merchant) gains a +2 Synergy bonus to his Barter skill checks. Time: Bartering prices on items takes a full-round action per transaction (or each item).

Bluff (Cha) “Wholly crap, look over there! There’s a Meatclaw over there eating that woman and her baby!” Bluffing is the art of deception, whether to mislead a target or to cause a distraction. Check: A Bluff check is opposed by the target’s Sense Motive check when trying to con or mislead. Favorable and unfavorable circ*mstances weigh heavily on the outcome of a bluff. Two circ*mstances can work against the character: The bluff is hard to believe, or the action that the bluff requires the target to take goes against the target’s self-interest, nature, personality, or orders. If it is important, the Overseer can distinguish between a bluff that fails because the target does not believe it, and one that fails because it asks too much of the target. For instance, if the target gets a +10 bonus because the bluff demands something risky of the target, and the target’s Sense Motive check succeeds by 10 or less, then the target did not so much see through the bluff as prove reluctant to go along with it. If the target’s Sense Motive check succeeds by 11 or more, he has seen through the bluff, and would have succeeded in doing so even if it had not placed any demand on him (that is, even without the +10 bonus). A successful Bluff check indicates that the target reacts as the character wishes, at least for a short time (usually 1 round or less), or the target believes something that the character wants him to believe. A bluff requires interaction between the character and the target. Targets unaware of the character cannot be bluffed. A bluff is not the same thing as a lie. A bluff is a quick prevarication intended to distract, confuse, or mislead, generally only for the short term. A bluff is not intended to withstand long-term or careful scrutiny, but rather to momentarily deter an action or decision. Bluffs involve attitude and body language. Bluffs often include lies, but they usually are not very sophisticated

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Example Circ*mstances The target wants to believe the character. The bluff is believable and does not affect the target much one way or the other. The bluff is a little hard to believe or puts the target at some kind of risk. The bluff is hard to believe or entails a large risk for the target. The bluff is way out there; it is almost too incredible to consider.

Sense Motive Modifier –5 +0 +5 +10 +20

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Skills and are not intended to deceive the target for more than a few moments. A lie, on the other hand, is a simple misrepresentation of the facts. Body language and attitude are not a big part of communication. The lie may be very sophisticated and well thought-out, and is intended to deceive a character at least until he discovers evidence to the contrary. A character should not make a Bluff check every time he utters a lie.

Feinting in Combat A character can use the Bluff skill to mislead an opponent in combat so that the opponent cannot dodge the character’s attack effectively. If the character succeeds, the next attack the character makes against the target ignores his Dexterity bonus to Defense (if the opponent has one), thus lowering his Defense score. Using Bluff in this way against a creature of animal intelligence (Int 1 or 2) requires a –8 penalty on the check. Against an non-intelligent creature, feinting is impossible.

Creating a Diversion to Hide A character can use Bluff to help him hide. A successful Bluff check gives the character the momentary diversion needed to attempt a Hide check while people are aware of the character. (See the Hide skill.)

Sending a Secret Message A character can use Bluff to send and understand secret messages while appearing to be speaking about other things. The DC for a basic message is 10. Complex messages or messages trying to communicate new information have DCs of 15 or 20. Both the sender and the receiver must make the check for the secret message to be successfully relayed and understood. Anyone listening in on a secret message can attempt a Sense Motive check (DC equal to the sender’s Bluff check result). If successful, the eavesdropper realizes that a secret message is contained in the communication. If the eavesdropper beats the DC by 5 or more, he understands the secret message. Whether trying to send or intercept a message, a failure by 5 or more points means that one side or the other misinterprets the message in some fashion.

Fight Dirty You can use the Bluff skill to fight dirty during melee combat. As a standard action, you can distract one adjacent opponent with a successful Fight Dirty skill check. This skill requires a successful attack roll and an opposed Bluff vs. Sense Motive check. Dirt to the Eye You throw a handful of dirt, gravel, or sand in your opponent's face. This fight dirty maneuver requires a successful ranged touch attack and an opposed Bluff vs. Sense Motive check. If the attack and Bluff check is successful, your opponent is blinded for three rounds or until he uses a standard action to clear his eyes. This attack does not affect robots. Low Blow You know when to throw a punch below the belt and make your opponent cry. This fight dirty maneuver requires a successful targeted attack (groin) and an opposed Bluff vs. Sense Motive check. If the targeted attack (groin) and Bluff check is successful, your opponent is denied his Dexterity and suffers a –4 penalty on his Defense for three rounds. This attack does not affect robots or creatures with no groin to target. Surprise, Surprise, Surprise! You can perform an attack with a hidden one-handed weapon as a touch attack. This Fight Dirty maneuver requires a successful opposed Bluff check vs. the target’s Sense Motive (plus level or hit dice) check. If the check is successful then the character can make a touch attack against the target. This Fight Dirty maneuver can only be used once per opponent. This attack does not affect animals or robots.

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Try Again?: Generally, a failed Bluff check makes the target too suspicious for the character to try another bluff in the same circ*mstances. For dirty fighting and feinting in combat, the character may try again freely as long as the action states no restrictions. Special: A character can take 10 when making a bluff (except for dirty fighting and feinting in combat), but cannot take 20. A character with the Deceptive feat gets a +2 bonus on all Bluff checks. Time: A bluff takes at least 1 round (and is at least a full-round action) but can take much longer if the character tries something elaborate. Using Bluff as a dirty fighting maneuver or feint in combat is an attack action.

Climb (Str)

Armor Penalty

Timmy fell down the well; guess it sucks to be him. Should you attempt to rescue Timmy, however, the Climb skill is the proper way to fish Timmy out (not a rope with a grappling hook through Timmy’s shoulder). Climb covers any situation that requires a character to climb up or down regardless if it is a pitfall, steep sand dune, or onto a structure. Check: With each successful Climb check, the character can advance up, down, or across a slope or a wall or other steep incline (or even a ceiling with handholds). A slope is considered to be any incline of less than 60 degrees; a wall is any incline of 60 degrees or steeper. A failed Climb check indicates that the character makes no progress, and a check that fails by 5 or more means that the character falls from whatever height he had already attained (unless the character is secured with some kind of harness or other equipment). The DC of the check depends on the conditions of the climb. If the climb is less than 10 feet, reduce the DC by 5. Since the character cannot move to avoid an attack, he is flat-footed while climbing (the character loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense). Any time the character takes damage while climbing, make a Climb check against the DC of the slope or wall. Failure means the character falls from his current height and sustains the appropriate falling damage. Accelerated Climbing: A character can try to climb more quickly than normal. The character can move his full speed, but the character takes a –5 penalty on his Climb check. (Moving twice the character’s speed in a round requires two checks, one for each move action.)

DC 0 5 10 15

Making Handholds and Footholds: A character can make handholds and footholds by pounding pitons into a wall. Doing so takes 1 minute per piton, and one piton is needed per 3 feet. As with any surface with handholds and footholds, a wall with pitons in it has a DC of 15. In similar fashion, a climber with an ice axe or other proper implement can cut handholds or footholds in an ice wall.

20

Catching Yourself When Falling: It is practically impossible for a character to catch himself on a wall while falling. Make a Climb check (DC equal to wall’s DC + 20) to do so. A slope is relatively easier to catch onto (DC equal to slope’s DC + 10).

25 25

–10* –5*

Example Wall or Surface or Task A slope too steep to walk up. A knotted rope with a wall to brace against. A rope with a wall to brace against. A knotted rope. A surface with sizable ledges to hold on to and stand on, such as a rugged cliff face. Any surface with adequate handholds and footholds (natural or artificial), such as a rough natural rock surface, a tree, or a chain-link fence. An unknotted rope. Pulling yourself up when dangling by your hands. An uneven surface with just a few narrow handholds and footholds, such as a coarse masonry wall or a sheer cliff face with a few crevices and small toeholds. A rough surface with no real handholds or footholds, such as a brick wall. Overhang or ceiling with handholds but no footholds. A perfectly smooth, flat, vertical surface can’t be climbed. Climbing inside an air duct or other location where one can brace against two opposite walls (reduces normal DC by 10). Climbing a corner where a character can brace against perpendicular walls (reduces normal DC by 5). Surface is slippery (increases normal DC by 5).

+5* *These modifiers are cumulative; use any that apply.

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Skills Special: Someone using a rope can haul a character upward (or lower the character) by means of sheer strength. Use two times a character’s maximum load to determine how much weight he can lift. A character can take 10 while climbing, but cannot take 20. A character without climbing gear takes a –4 penalty on Climb checks. At the Overseer’s discretion, certain kinds of climbing attempts might require only a rope or some other implement, or even just one’s hands and feet, rather than a full set of climbing gear to avoid the penalty. A character with the Athletic feat gets a +2 bonus on all Climb checks. Time: Climbing at one-half your speed is a full-round action. Moving half that far (one-fourth the character’s speed) is a move action. Accelerated climbing, allowing the character to climb at his full speed, is a full-round action. A character can move half that far (one-half his speed) as a move action.

Computer Use (Int)

Trained Only

Nuclear explosions, EMP shockwaves and radiation from the Exodus have made it difficult to find operating computers in the Wasteland. Very few computers survived the cataclysms of the war. Most computers that are found are of a military or vault nature, making it quite difficult to operate them, since most passwords and codes were forgotten long ago or are extremely guarded secrets. All of this makes the Computer Use skill very difficult to use in the Wasteland. Check: In the Wastelands, every computer operation requires a Computer Use check, no matter if the character wants to just: look through the general functions of a terminal, searching an unfamiliar network for a particular file, writing computer programs, altering existing programs to perform differently (better or worse), or breaking through computer security.

Find File This skill can be used for finding files or data on an unfamiliar system. The DC for the check and the time required are determined by the size of the site on which the character is searching. Size of Site RoboCore 2000 PA Abandoned Shelter Mainframe Alpha-Net network Military network

DC 15 20 25 35

Time 5 rounds 1 minutes 5 minutes 20 minutes

Finding public information on Alpha-Net System does not fall under this category; usually, such a task requires a Research check. This application of the Computer Use skill only pertains to finding files on private systems with which the character is not familiar.

Defeat Computer Security

This function of the computer use skill usually does not apply to characters as computers found in the Wastelands function under their own artificial intelligence (AI), or by a secure organization like the Steel Disciples. In a forgotten bunker or fallout shelter with problematic power issues, however, the security can be compromised. The DC is determined by the quality of the AI security installed to defend the system. If the check is failed by 5 or more, the security system immediately alerts its administrator or AI that there has been an unauthorized entry. An alerted administrator or AI may attempt to identify the character or cut off the character’s access to the system. Sometimes, when accessing a difficult site, the character has to defeat security at more than one stage of the operation. If the character beats the DC by 10 or more when attempting to defeat computer security, the character automatically succeeds at all subsequent security checks at that site until the end of the character’s session (see Computer Hacking Level of Security DC below). Abandoned Shelter 25 Artificial Intelligence Alpha-Net Military

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Defeat Computer Security

This function of the computer use skill usually does not apply to characters as computers found in the Wastelands function under their own artificial intelligence (AI), or by a secure organization like the Steel Disciples. In a forgotten bunker or fallout shelter with problematic power issues, however, the security can be compromised. The DC is determined by the quality of the AI security installed to defend the system. If the check is failed by 5 or more, the security system immediately alerts its administrator or AI that there has been an unauthorized entry. An alerted administrator or AI may attempt to identify the character or cut off the character’s access to the system. Sometimes, when accessing a difficult site, the character has to defeat security at more than one stage of the operation. If the character beats the DC by 10 or more when attempting to defeat computer security, the character automatically succeeds at all subsequent security checks at that site until the end of the character’s session (see Computer Hacking below).

Level of Security Abandoned Shelter Artificial Intelligence Alpha-Net Military

DC 25 30 35 40

Computer Hacking

Breaking into a secure computer or network is often called hacking. When a character hacks, he attempts to invade a site. A site is a virtual location containing files, data, or applications. A site can be as small as a single computer or as large as a vault network connecting computers and data archives all over the world— the important thing is that access to the site connects the user to everything within it. Some sites can be accessed via Alpha-Net; others are not connected to any outside network and can only be tapped into by a user who physically accesses a computer connected to the site. Every site is overseen by a system administrator or AI— the person in charge of the site, and who maintains its security. Often, the system administrator is the only person with access to all of a site’s functions and data. A site can have more than one system administrator; large sites have a system administrator on duty at all times. When a character hacks into a site, the visit is called a session. Once a character stops accessing the site, the session is over. The character can go back to the site in the future; when he does, it is a new session. Several steps are required to hack into a site: Covering Tracks This step is optional. By making a Computer Use check (DC 25), a character can alter his identifying information. This imposes a –5 penalty on any attempt made to identify the character if his activity is detected.

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Skills Access the Site There are two ways to do this: physically or over the Alpha-Net. Physical Access A character gains physical access to the computer, or a computer connected to the site. If the site being hacked is not connected to the Alpha-Net, this is probably the only way a character can access it. A variety of skill checks may be required, depending on the method used to gain access. Internet Access Reaching a site over the Alpha-Net requires two Computer Use checks. The first check (DC 20) is needed to find the site on the net. The second is a check to defeat computer security (see the Computer Use skill Description). Once a character has succeeded in both checks, the character has accessed the site.

Locate What You’re Looking For

To find the data (or application, or remote device) the character wants, make a Computer Use check. See Find File under the skill Description.

Defeat File Security

Many networks have additional file security. If that is the case, the character needs to make another check to defeat computer security.

Do Your Stuff

Finally, the character can actually do what he came to do. If the character just wants to look at records, no additional check is needed. (A character can also download data onto a data crystal, although that often takes several rounds—or even several minutes, for especially large amounts of information—to complete). Altering or deleting records sometimes requires yet another check to defeat computer security. Other operations can be carried out according to the Computer Use skill Description.

Defend Security

If the character gains access to a master computer and hacks into it, he can act as a system administrator for a site, and can defend the site against intruders. If the site alerts the character to an intruder, the character can attempt to cut off the intruder’s access (end the intruder’s session), or even to identify the intruder. To cut off access, make an opposed Computer Use check against the intruder. If the character succeeds, the intruder’s session is ended. The intruder might be able to defeat the character’s security and access his site again, but the intruder will have to start the hacking process all over. Attempting to cut off access takes a full round. One surefire way to prevent further access is to simply shut the site down. With a single computer, that is often no big deal— but on a large site with many computers (or computers controlling functions that can’t be interrupted), it may be time-consuming or even impossible. To identify the intruder, make an opposed Computer Use check against the intruder. If the character succeeds, the character learns the site from which the intruder is operating (if it is a single computer, the character learns the name of the computer’s owner). Identifying the intruder requires 1 minute and is a separate check from cutting off access. This check can only be made if the intruder is accessing the character’s site for the entire length of the check— if the intruder’s session ends before the character finishes the check, the character automatically fails.

Degrade Programming

A character can destroy or alter applications on a computer to make use of that computer harder or impossible. The DC for the attempt depends on what the character tries to do. Crashing a computer simply shuts it down. Its user can restart it without making a skill check (however, restarting takes 1 minute). Destroying programming makes the computer unusable until the programming is repaired. Damaging programming imposes a –4 penalty on all Computer Use checks made with the computer (sometimes this is preferable to destroying the programming, since the user might not

Scope of Alteration Crash computer Destroy programming Damage programming

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know that anything is wrong, and would not simply decide to use a different computer). A character can degrade the programming of multiple computers at a single site; doing so adds +2 to the DC for each additional computer. Fixing the degraded programming requires 2 hours and a Computer Use check against a DC equal to the DC for degrading it + 5.

Write Program A character can create a program to help with a specific task. circ*mstance bonus to the task.

Doing so grants the character a +2

A specific task, in this case, is one type of operation with one target. The DC to write a program is 25; the time required is 2 hours.

Operate Remote Device

Many devices are computer-operated via remote links. If the character has access to the computer that controls such systems, the character can either shut them off or change their operating parameters. The DC depends on the nature of Type of Operation DC Time the operation. If the Shut down passive remote (including cameras 25 5 rounds per remote character fails the check and door locks) by 5 or more, the Shut down active remote (including motion 30 5 rounds per remote system immediately detectors and alarms) alerts its administrator Reset parameters of a program or security 35 5 minutes per remote that there has been an Change passcard codes 30 5 minutes unauthorized use of the Hide evidence of alteration +15 5 minutes equipment. An alerted Artificial Intelligence security +10 — administrator may attempt Alpha-Net security +15 — to identify the Military security +20 — character or cut off his access to the system. Special: A character can take 10 when using the Computer Use skill. A character can take 20 in some cases, but not in those that involve a penalty for failure. (A character cannot take 20 to defeat computer security or defend security.) A character with the Gearhead feat gets a +2 bonus on all Computer Use checks. Time: Computer Use requires at least a full-round action. The Overseer may determine that some tasks require several rounds, a few minutes, or longer, as described above.

Concentration (Con) Sometimes, time is not on your side, when bullets are bouncing off the walls and flying over your head, and you are attempting to rig an automatic door to permanently lock. Concentration is required for any physical skill involving a character’s hands when under duress or in an extreme condition. This also applies to mental skills when attempting to read a data crystal or researching a piece of ancient literature. Check: A character makes a Concentration check whenever he may potentially be distracted while engaged in some action that requires his full attention (such as making a Disable Device or Treat Injury check). Situations such as taking damage, working in a bouncing vehicle, or dealing with severe weather can require a character to make a Concentration check. If the Concentration check succeeds, the character may continue with the action. If the Concentration check fails, the action automatically fails (with the appropriate ramifications, if any), and the action is wasted.

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Skills A successful Concentration check still does not allow a character to take 10 when in a stressful situation; he must roll the check as normal. The check DC depends on the nature of the distraction. Try Again?: Yes, though a success does not cancel the effects of a previous failure, such as the disruption of an action that was being concentrated on.

Distraction Damaged during the action 1 Taking continuous damage during the action 2 Vigorous motion (bouncy vehicle ride, small boat in rough water, below decks in a storm-tossed ship, riding a horse) Violent motion (very rough vehicle ride, small boat in rapids, on deck of storm-tossed ship, galloping horse) Extraordinarily violent motion (earthquake) Entangled in net or snare Grappling or pinned Weather is a high wind carrying blinding rain or sleet Weather is wind-driven hail, dust, or debris

DC 10 + damage dealt 10 + half of continuous damage last dealt 10 15 20 15 20 5 10

1 Such as an activity that requires more than a single full-round action. Also from an attack of opportunity or

readied attack made in response to the action being taken (for activities requiring no more than a full-round action). 2 Such as from catching on fire.

Special: A character can use Concentration to avoid attacks of opportunity when attempting a skill check that normally provokes attacks of opportunity. The DC to do so is 15. If the Concentration check succeeds, the character may attempt the action normally without incurring any attacks of opportunity. If the Concentration check fails, the related check automatically fails just as if the character’s concentration had been disrupted by a distraction. The character does not provoke attacks of opportunity, however. This use of Concentration applies only to skill checks. It does not apply to other actions that normally provoke attacks of opportunity, such as movement or making unarmed attacks. A character with the Focused feat gets a +2 bonus on all Concentration checks. Time: Making a Concentration check does not require an action; it is either a reaction (when attempted in response to a distraction) or part of another action (when attempted actively).

Craft (Int) The world after the Exodus is a devastated one. Everything wears the mark of the Great War. Once proud cities of the US now resemble forgotten cemeteries. Factories and workshops had gone in the light of the atomics. Almost all that was created ceased to exist. Now the survivors try to reconstruct what has been lost, but it is not an easy task. The Craft skill is difficult to use in the world since good material is hard to find and rarely newly created. This skill encompasses several categories, each of them treated as a separate skill: Craft (chemical), Craft (electronic), Craft (mechanical), Craft (structural), Craft (visual arts), and Craft (writing).

Material Scarcity

Due to the current situation in the world it is sometimes extremely difficult to find components needed to create a new good. Only highly populated places (at almost always a high price) or forgotten bases provide a possibility of finding the component or raw material needed. In Exodus d20 every raw material has a new characteristic– Scarcity. Scarcity has six different levels: Common, Uncommon, Infrequent, Rare, Very Rare, and Unique. Each level tells how hard it is to find specific raw material and where the character can look for it. This is furthered detailed under Craft (salvage).

Craft skills are specifically focused on creating objects. To use a Craft skill effectively, a character must have a kit or some other set of basic tools.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 To use Craft, first decide what the character is trying to make and consult the category Descriptions below. The character must acquire the raw materials through purchase or by scavenging. Material Scarcity

Place

Common

Small Village, Town, Wasteland

Uncommon

Trade / Merchant Town, Ruins

Infrequent

Fallout Shelter, Hi-Populated Trade City

Rare Very Rare Unique

Description

Black Market, Military base, Mob Family Steel Disciples or other military organization Special Encounter

Example

The materials are easy to find and are not very expensive. The character needs to do some research on the local market to get it and pay some extra fees. The character needs a lot of time to find it (up to days) and even bribe someone to get it. The character may have to kill for it or do a favor for someone to get it. The character will need to go on a quest to get the material. Special Encounter

Timber, scraps of metal, bricks Gun barrel, solid piece of metal, large stonework Computer component, mid quality weapon part Car part, energy weapon component Piece of Power Armor, experiment gun or armor part Alien metal

Generally, a character can take 10 when using a Craft skill to construct an object, but cannot take 20 (since doing so represents multiple attempts, and the character uses up the raw materials after the first attempt). The exception is Craft (writing); a character can take 20 because the character does not use up any raw materials.

Craft (chemical) (Int)

Trained Only

This skill allows a character to mix chemicals to create acids, bases, explosives, and poisonous substances.

Acids and Bases

Acids are corrosives substances. Bases are alkaline substances that neutralize acids but do not deal damage. A base of a certain type counteracts an acid of the same type or a less potent type. Craft DC: The DC of the Craft check to create a quantity of the acid or base.

Acid Type Mild (1d6/1d10) 1 Potent (2d6/2d10) Concentrated (3d6/3d10)

Acid DC 20 25 35

Base DC 15 20 25

Time 1 min. 30 min. 1 hr.

The dice rolls in parentheses are typical contact damage/immersion damage caused per round of immersion. 1

Time: The amount of time required for the Craft check to make the acid. Special: A character without a chemical kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (chemical) checks.

Explosives

Building an explosive from scratch is dangerous. If the Craft (chemical) check fails, the raw materials are wasted. If the check fails by 5 or more, the explosive compound detonates as it is being made, dealing half of its intended damage to the builder and anyone else in the burst radius. If the check succeeds, the final product is a solid material, about the size of a brick. An explosive compound does not include a fuse or detonator. Connecting a fuse or detonator requires a Demolitions check. Homemade explosives deal concussion and explosive damage. Example: Timmy is making a black powder pipe bomb out of bullets. He is using the bullets for shrapnel, the black powder from the casings, and an old lead pipe. This is a simple bomb. Homemade Explosive Improvised (1d6/5 feet) 1 Simple (2d6/5 feet) Moderate (4d6/10 feet) Complex (6d6/15 feet) Powerful (8d6/20 feet) Devastating (10d6/25 feet)

Craft DC 15 20 25 30 35 40

Reflex DC 10 12 12 15 15 18

Time 1 round 10 min. 1 hr. 3 hr. 12 hr. 24 hr.

1 The figures in parentheses are typical damage/burst radius for each type of explosive.

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Skills Craft DC: The DC of the Craft check to create a homemade explosive. Time: The amount of time required for the Craft check. Special: A character without a chemical kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (chemical) checks.

Pharmaceutical This skill allows a character to compound medicinal drugs as detailed in Chapter 4: Medical Supplies and Chemicals (Drugs). Craft DC: The DC of the Craft check to create a chemical is listed at the end of the description of the

chemical in Chapter 4. Time: The amount of time required for the Craft check of a chemical is listed at the end of the description of the chemical in Chapter 4.

Special: A character without a chemical kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (chemical) checks. A character with the Medical Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (chemical) checks to create pharmaceutical drugs.

Poisonous Substances

Solid poisons are usually ingested. Liquid poisons are most effective when injected directly into the bloodstream. Gaseous poisons must be inhaled to be effective. The table below summarizes the characteristics of various poisons. Save DC: The Difficulty Class of the Fortitude save to negate the effects of the poison. Initial Damage: The damage a character takes immediately upon failing his Fortitude save. Secondary Damage: The damage a character takes after 1 minute of exposure to the poison if the character fails a second saving throw. Ability score damage is temporary, unless marked with an asterisk, in which case the damage is a permanent ability drain. Unconsciousness lasts for 1d3 hours, and paralysis lasts for 2d6 minutes. Craft DC: The DC of the Craft check to create a quantity of the poison. Time: The amount of time required for the Craft check. If the Craft check succeeds, the final product is a synthesized solid or liquid poison stored in a bottle (containing 4 doses) or a gas stored in a pressurized cylinder. When released, the gas is sufficient to fill a 10foot-radius area and takes 1 round to fill the area. Special: A character without a chemical kit takes a –4 penalty on Craft (chemical) checks. A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (chemical) checks.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Poison Arsenic Atropine Belladonna (plant) Blue vitriol Blue-ringed octopus venom Chloral hydrate

Type Ingested Injury Injury Injury Injury

Fortitude DC 15 13 18 12 15

Initial Damage 1d4 Str 1d6 Dex 1d6 Str 1d2 Con 1d4 Con

Secondary Damage 2d4 Con 1d6 Str 2d6 Str 1d2 Con 1d4 Con

Craft DC 24 14 n/a 9 n/a

Time 4 hr. 1 hr. n/a 1 hr. n/a

Ingested

18

1d6 Dex

Unconsciousness 1d3 hours None

28

8 hr.

Chloroform1

Inhaled

17

Curare (plant) Cyanide Cyanogen DDT Knockout gas

Injury Injury Inhaled Inhaled Inhaled

18 16 19 17 18

Unconsciousness 1d3 hours 2d4 Dex 1d6 Con 1d4 Dex 1d2 Str 1d3 Dex

24

4 hr.

n/a 31 28 20 26

n/a 15 hr. 8 hr. 4 hr. 8 hr.

1d2 Str

2d4 Wis 2d6 Con 2d4 Con 1d4 Str Unconsciousness 1d3 hours 1d4 Con

Lead arsenate (gas) Lead arsenate (solid) Mustard gas Paris green (gas) Paris green (solid) Puffer poison (fish) Rattlesnake venom Sarin nerve gas Scorpion/tarantula venom Strychnine Tear gas

Inhaled

12

17

2 hr.

Ingested

12

1d2 Con

1d4 Con

18

2 hr.

Inhaled Inhaled Ingested Injury

17 14 14 13

1d4 Con 1d2 Con 1d4 Con 1d6 Str

26 20 24 n/a

8 hr. 4 hr. 4 hr. n/a

Injury Inhaled Injury

12 18 11

1d6 Con 1d4 Con 1d2 Str

2d4 Con 1d4 Con 1d4 Con Paralysis minutes 1d6 Con 2d4 Con 1d2 Str

n/a 30 n/a

n/a 15 hr. n/a

Injury Inhaled

19 15

2d4 Con —

23 21

4 hr. 4 hr.

Inhaled

22

1d3 Dex Nauseated rounds 1d6 Con

VX nerve gas

2d6 Con

42

48 hr.

Craft (electronic) (Int)

1d6

2d6

Trained Only

This skill allows a character to build electronic equipment from scratch, such as audio and video equipment, timers and listening devices, or radios and communication devices. When building an electronic device from scratch, the character describes the kind of device he wants to construct; then the Overseer decides whether the device is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced compared to current technology. Special: Craft (electronic) requires a Snapper Super Toolkit for crafting tasks over DC 15 or a multipurpose tool for tasks of DC 15 and under. A multipurpose tool can be use on tasks over DC 15, but imposes a –2 penalty to the Craft check. If the character does not have the appropriate tools for the Craft, he takes a –4 penalty on the check. A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (electronic) checks. Examples of Scratch-Built Electronics Simple (timer or detonator) Moderate (walkie-talkie) Complex (electronic lock) Advanced (RoboCore PA 2000)

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Craft DC 25 30 35 40

Time 1 hr. 12 hr. 24 hr. 60 hr.

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Skills Craft (mechanical) (Int)

Trained Only

This skill allows a character to build mechanical devices from scratch, including engines and engine parts, weapons, armor, and other gadgets. When building a mechanical device from scratch, the character describes the kind of device he wants to construct; then the Overseer decides if the device is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced compared to current technology. Special: Craft (mechanical) requires a Examples of Scratch-Built Mechanical Device Craft Snapper Super Toolkit for crafting tasks over DC DC 15 or a multipurpose tool for tasks of Simple (tripwire trap) 25 Moderate (engine component, light armor) 30 DC 15 and under. A multipurpose tool Complex (handgun, heavy armor) 35 can be use on tasks over DC 15, but Advanced (rebuilt fusion cell engine) 40 imposes a –2 penalty to the Craft check. If the character does not have the appropriate tools for the Craft, he takes a –4 penalty on the check.

Time 1 hr 12 hr. 24 hr. 60 hr.

A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (mechanical) checks.

Craft (structural) (Int) This skill allows a character to build wooden, concrete, or metal structures from scratch, including bookcases, desks, walls, houses, and so forth, and includes such handyman skills as plumbing, house painting, drywall, laying cement, and building cabinets. When building a structure from scratch, the character describes the kind of structure he wants to construct; then the Overseer decides if the structure is simple, moderate, complex, or advanced in scope and difficulty. Special: Craft (structural) requires a Examples of Scratch-Built Structure Snapper Super Toolkit for crafting tasks over Simple (hand-pulled cart or shed) DC 15 or a multipurpose tool for tasks of DC 15 Moderate (barn or Brahman hauler) and under. A multipurpose tool can be use on Complex (one-story house) tasks over DC 15, but imposes a –2 penalty Advanced (underground bunker) to the Craft check. If the character does not have the appropriate tools for the Craft, he takes a –4 penalty on the check.

Craft DC 15 20 30 40

Time 12 hr. 24 hr. 60 hr. 600 hr.

A character with the Builder feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (structural) checks.

Craft (salvage) (Int) As part of the craft skill a character can extract material found through a Search (scavenge) skill check. After the material is found a character can attempt to extract the material with a Craft (salvage) skill check. The DC is based on the size of the material extracted as denoted on the chart below. Craft (salvage) Material Size and Extraction Weight DC Under 2-1/2sq. ft. 10 3sq. ft – 5sq. ft. 15 6sq. ft. – 10sq. ft. 20 Over 11sq. ft.¹ 30 Length under 5ft. +5 Length 5ft. – 10ft. +10 Length over 10ft.¹ +15 Under 10lb. +0 11lb. – 30lb. +5 31lb – 50lb. +10 51lb – 100lb. ¹ +15 Over 100lb. ¹ +20 ¹ Requires a vehicle or cart to haul away

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Value (L/G/P) 5/10/20 10/20/50 20/50/100 30/75/150 x1 x1.5 x2 x1 x1.5 x2 x2.5 x3

Low Quality material generally is solid rough stone or bricks that can be re-worked, old but sturdy cracked timber, or slightly rusted metal. Good Quality material consists of solid stonework, old sturdy timber, or tarnished metal. Preserved Quality material is material that has not faced the environment and shows little to no age or damage. This type of quality is typically found in underground bunkers and fallout shelters or under a large pile of debris.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Craft (visual art) (Int) This skill allows a character to create paintings or drawings, or in some other way create a work of visual art. When attempting to create a work of visual art, the character simply makes a Craft (visual art) check, the result of which determines the quality of the work. Skill Check Result 9 or lower 10–19 20–24 25–30 31 or higher

Effort Achieved Untalented amateur Talented amateur Professional Expert Master

Unless the effort is particularly elaborate or the character must acquire an expensive piece of equipment, the basic components have a purchase DC of 5.

Creating a work of visual art requires at least a full-round action, but usually takes an hour, a day, or more, depending on the scope of the project. Special: A character with the Creative feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (visual art) checks.

Craft (writing) (Int) This skill allows a character to create short stories, novels, coins and screenplays, newspaper articles and columns, and similar works of writing. When creating a work of writing, the player simply makes a Craft (writing) check, the result of which determines the quality of the work.

Skill Check Result 9 or lower 10–19 20–24 25–30 31 or higher

Effort Achieved Untalented amateur Talented amateur Professional Expert Master

Creating a work of writing requires at least 1 hour, but usually takes a day, a week, or more, depending on the scope of the project. Special: A character with the Creative feat gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (writing) checks.

Decipher Script (Int)

Trained Only

Got that pesky message you cannot decipher, well bust out your decoder ring from that box of Cracker Smacks and get to reading. Deciphering coin is the art of breaking coded messages. Check: A character can decipher writing in a language or in code, or interpret the meaning of an incomplete text. The base DC is 20 for the simplest messages, 25 for standard codes, and 30 or higher for intricate or complex codes or exotic messages. Deciphering a code on a computer still requires a Computer Use skill check. Helpful texts or computer programs can provide a bonus (usually a +2 circ*mstance bonus) on the check, provided they are applicable to the coin in question. If the check succeeds, the character understands the general content of a piece of writing, reading about one page of text or its equivalent in 1 minute. If the check fails, the Overseer makes a Wisdom check (DC 10) for the character to see if he avoids drawing a false conclusion about the text. (Success means that the character does not draw a false conclusion; failure means that the character does.) The Overseer secretly makes both the skill check and the Wisdom check so the character cannot tell whether the conclusion drawn is accurate or not. Try Again?: No, unless conditions change or new information is uncovered. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Decipher Script check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Studious feat gets a +2 bonus on all Decipher Script checks. Time: Decipher Script takes 1 minute or more, depending on the complexity of the code.

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Skills Demolitions (Int)

Trained Only

Need to blow up that outhouse? Demolition is the way to go. The Demolition skill reflects the training a person has on how to handle explosives, set detonators, and disarm explosives. Check: Setting a simple explosive to blow up at a certain spot does not require a check, but connecting and setting a detonator does. Also, placing an explosive for maximum effect against a structure calls for a check, as does disarming an explosive device.

Set Detonator Most explosives require a detonator to go off. Connecting a detonator to an explosive requires a Demolitions check (DC 10). Failure means that the explosive fails to go off as planned. Failure by 10 or more means the explosive goes off as the detonator is being installed. A character can make an explosive difficult to disarm. To do so, the character chooses the disarm DC before making his check to set the detonator (it must be higher than 10). The character’s DC to set the detonator is equal to the disarm DC.

Place Explosive Device

Carefully placing an explosive against a fixed structure (a stationary, unattended inanimate object) can maximize the damage dealt by exploiting vulnerabilities in the structure’s construction. The Overseer makes the check (so that the character does not know exactly how well he has done). On a result of 15 or higher, the explosive deals double damage to the structure against which it is placed. On a result of 25 or higher, it deals triple damage to the structure. In all cases, it deals normal damage to all other targets within its burst radius.

Disarm Explosive Device

Disarming an explosive that has been set to go off requires a Demolitions check. The DC is usually 10, unless the person who set the detonator chose a higher disarm DC. If the character fails the check, he does not disarm the explosive. If the character fails by more than 5, the explosive goes off. Special: A character can take 10 when using the Demolitions skill, but cannot take 20. A character with the Cautious feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Demolitions checks. A character without a demolitions kit takes a –4 penalty on Demolitions checks. Making an explosive requires the Craft (chemical) skill. See that skill Description for details. Time: Setting a detonator is usually a full-round action. Placing an explosive device takes 1 minute or more, depending on the scope of the job.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Diplomacy (Cha) Diplomacy is generally used for negotiation between two parties, such as ambassadors from two Wasteland cities discussing trade services or a character attempting to convince a Constable that he was not involved in a conflict. Check: A character can change others’ attitudes with a successful check (see the table below). In negotiations, participants roll opposed Diplomacy checks to see who gains the advantage. Opposed checks also resolve cases where two advocates or diplomats plead opposing cases before a third party.

Attitude Hostile Unfriendly Indifferent Friendly Helpful Initial Attitude Hostile

Means Will take risks to hurt or avoid you Wishes you ill Doesn’t much care Wishes you well

Possible Actions Attack, interfere, berate, flee Mislead, gossip, avoid, watch suspiciously, insult Act as socially expected Chat, advise, offer limited help, advocate Protect, back up, heal, aid

Will take risks to help you —————— New Attitude ————— Hostile Unf. Indif. Friendly Helpful 19 or 20 25 35 45 less 4 or less 5 15 25 35 — 0 or 1 15 25 less — — 0 or 1 15 less

Diplomacy can be used to influence an Unfriendly Overseer character’s attitude. The Overseer Indifferent chooses the character’s initial attitude based on circ*mstances. Most of the time, the people Friendly the heroes meet are indifferent toward them, but a specific situation may call for a different initial attitude. The DCs given in the accompanying table show what it takes to change someone’s attitude with the use of the Diplomacy skill. The character does not declare a specific outcome he is trying for; instead, make the check and compare the result to the table on the prior page. Examples of Bribes Target Guard Raider Informant Government Official

Bribery and Diplomacy Bribe 20 Coins 50 Coins 150 Coins

Diplomacy Bonus 1 +1 bonus +1 bonus +1 bonus

1 A character can gain an additional bonus equal to the multiple of the bribe

amount. Example: Timmy bribes a guard with 80 coins and therefore makes the guard more susceptible to his bribe and gains a +4 bonus to his Diplomacy check.

Offering money or another form of favor can, in the right situation, improve a character’s chances with a Diplomacy skill check. Bribery allows a character to circumvent various official obstacles when a person in a position of trust or authority is willing to accept such an offering.

An illegal act, bribery requires two willing participants— one to offer a bribe and the other to accept it. When a character requires a bribe to render services, then a character’s Diplomacy check automatically fails if a bribe is not attached to it. If a bribe is not required, a character can add a bribe to get a bonus on his skill check. This can backfire, as some characters will be insulted by a bribe offer (their attitude changes one step for the worse) and others will report the hero to the proper authorities. Try Again?: Generally, trying again does not work. Even if the initial check succeeds, the other character can only be persuaded so far. If the initial check fails, the other character has probably become more firmly committed to his position, and trying again is futile. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Diplomacy check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Trustworthy feat gets a +2 bonus on all Diplomacy checks. Time: Diplomacy is at least a full-round action. The Overseer may determine that some negotiations require a longer period of time.

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Skills Disable Device (Int)

Trained Only

Got a locked door you cannot get open? Damn raider’s leaving mine traps in your Bison field again? Or is that stupid AI putting up force fields to keep you out of the fallout shelter? Well, with a little training from the local street rats (or Thieves’ Guild) you will not have these problems for long. Disable Device is the art of disabling an object, such as a lock, a booby trap, or an electronic security device. Check: The Overseer makes the Disable Device check so that the character does not necessarily know whether he has succeeded.

Open Lock Example Lock Type Cheap (combination or padlock) Average (deadbolt) High quality (bank vault) High security (military base)

DC 20 25 30 40

A character can pick conventional locks, finesse combination locks, and bypass electronic locks. The character must have a lockpick set (for a mechanical lock) or an electrical lockpick (for an electronic lock). The DC depends on the quality of the lock.

Disable Security Device A character can disable a security device, such as an electric fence, motion sensor, or security camera. The character must be able to reach the actual device. If the device is monitored, the fact that the character attempted to disable it will probably be noticed. Example Device Type DC When disabling a monitored device, the character can Cheap (localized siren alarm) 25 prevent his tampering from being noticed. Doing so Average (security camera) 30 requires 10 minutes and an electrical tool kit, and High quality (motion detector) 35 increases the DC of the check by +10. High security (military base or vault alarm) 40

Traps and Sabotage

Disabling (or rigging or jamming) a simple mechanical device has a DC of 10. More intricate and complex devices have higher DCs. The Overseer rolls the check. If the check succeeds, the character disables the device. If the check fails by 4 or less, the character has failed but can try again. If the character fails by 5 or more, something goes wrong. If it is a trap, the character springs it. If it is some sort of sabotage, the character thinks the device is disabled, but it still works normally. A character can rig simple devices to work normally for a while and then fail some time later (usually after 1d4 rounds or minutes of use). Try Again?: Yes, though the character must be aware that he has failed in order to try again. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Disable Device check. A character can take 20 to open a lock or to disable a security device, unless the character is trying to prevent his tampering from being noticed. Possessing the proper tools gives a character the best chance of succeeding on a Disable Device check. Opening a lock requires a lockpick set (for a mechanical lock) or an electrical tool kit (for an electronic lock). Disabling a security device requires either a mechanical tool kit or an electrical tool kit, depending on the nature of the device. If the character does not have the appropriate tools, he takes a –4 penalty on your check. A character with the Cautious feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Disable Device checks. Time: Disabling a simple mechanical device is a full-round action. Intricate or complex devices require 2d4 rounds.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Disguise (Cha) A phone booth and a change of clothes can change any mild mannered man into a man of steel. Disguise is the art of altering ones appearance to look as someone else. Disguise is generally used in the Wasteland to hide from someone, like the mob, that is looking to put a serious hurt on a character or to infiltrate an organization. Check: A character’s Disguise check result determines how good the disguise is. It is opposed by others’ Spot check results. Make one Disguise check even if several people make Spot checks. The Overseer makes the character’s Disguise check secretly so that the character is not sure how well his disguise holds up to scrutiny. If the character does not draw any attention other characters and NPCs do not get to make Spot checks. If the character comes to the attention of people who are suspicious, the suspicious person gets to make a Spot check. (The Overseer can assume that such observers take 10 on their Spot checks.)

Disguise Minor details only Appropriate uniform or costume Disguised as different sex Disguised as different age category

Modifier +5 +2 –2 –2 1

1 Per step of difference between the character’s age category and the

disguised age category (child, young adult, adult, middle age, old, or venerable).

The effectiveness of the character’s disguise depends in part on how much the character is attempting to change his appearance. If the character is impersonating a particular individual, those who know what that person looks like automatically get to make Spot checks. Furthermore, they get a bonus on their Spot checks.

Familiarity Recognizes on sight Friend or associate Close friend Intimate

Bonus +4 +6 +8 +10

Usually, an individual makes a Spot check to detect a disguise immediately upon meeting the character and each hour thereafter. If the character casually meets many different people, each for a short time, the Overseer checks once per day or hour, using an average Spot modifier for the group (assuming they take 10).

Try Again?: No, though the character can assume the same disguise again at a later time. If others saw through the previous disguise, they are automatically treated as suspicious if the character assumes the same disguise again. Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 when establishing a disguise. A character without a disguise kit takes a –4 penalty on Disguise checks. A character with the Deceptive feat gets a +2 bonus on all Disguise checks. A character can help someone else create a disguise for himself, treating it as an Aid Another attempt. Time: A Disguise check requires 1d4 x10 minutes of preparation. The Overseer makes Spot checks for those who encounter the character immediately upon meeting the character and again each hour or day thereafter, depending on circ*mstances.

Drive (Dex) The Drive skill covers Bovine driven haulers and wagons as well as fusion cell powered vehicles (rare as they are, should a character manage to find an operational cell powered vehicle). Check: Routine tasks, such as ordinary driving, do not require a skill check. Make a check only when some unusual circ*mstance exists (such as inclement weather), or when the character is driving during a dramatic situation (the character is being chased or attacked, for example, or is trying to reach a destination in a limited amount of time). When driving, the character can attempt simple maneuvers or stunts. See Driving a Vehicle in Chapter 4 for more details.

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Skills Try Again?: Most driving checks have consequences for failure that make trying again impossible. Special: A character can take 10 when driving, but cannot take 20. A character with the Vehicle Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Drive checks. There is no penalty for operating a Bovine driven vehicle or bicycle. Other types of fusion powered vehicles (Bikes, Boats, Construction, Four-Wheeler, Heavy Duty, Military, and Watercrafts) require the corresponding Surface Vehicle Operation feat, or the character takes a –4 penalty on Drive checks. A character with 5 ranks of Handle Animal gains a +2 synergy bonus to his Drive skill when operating a Bison (or other beast of burden) powered vehicle. Time: A Drive check is a move action.

Escape Artist (Dex)

Armor Penalty

The Wasteland is filled full of nasty critters that are more that willing to give a character a hug and not one of those love and kisses kind. When you find yourself in Elmira’s arms or entwined in rope, best to pull a Houdini and wiggle out of your restraints. Check: Make a check to escape from restraints or to squeeze through a tight space. For ropes, a character’s Escape Artist check is opposed by the Dexterity check result of the opponent who tied the bonds. Since it is easier to tie someone up than to escape from being tied up, the opponent gets a +20 bonus on his Dexterity check.

Restraint Ropes Net Handcuffs Tight space Grappler

DC Opponent’s Dex check +20 20 35 30 Opponent’s grapple check

For a tight space, a check is only called for if the character’s head fits, but his shoulders do not. If the space is long, such as in an airshaft, the Overseer may call for multiple checks. A character cannot fit through a space that his head does not fit through. A character can make an Escape Artist check opposed by his opponent’s Grapple check to get out of a grapple or out of a pinned condition (so that the character is just being grappled). Doing so is an attack action, so if the character escapes the grapple he can move in the same round. Try Again?: A character can make another check after a failed check if the character is squeezing through a tight space, making multiple checks. If the situation permits, the character can make additional checks as long as he is not being actively opposed. Special: A character can take 10 on an Escape Artist check. A character can take 20 if he is not being actively opposed (a character can take 20 if he is tied up, even though it is an opposed check, because the opponent is not actively opposing the character). A character with the Nimble feat gets a +2 bonus on all Escape Artist checks. Time: Making a check to escape from being bound by ropes, handcuffs, or other restraints (except a grappler) requires 1 minute. Escaping a net is a full-round action. Squeezing through a tight space takes at least 1 minute, maybe longer, depending on the distance that must be crossed.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Forgery

(Int)

Need a security pass to get into Barter City again? Grab that expired pass, a blank sheet of paper, some ink and scribe that form and signature. The Forgery skill is used generally to forge another individual’s signature (usually a person of importance) or personal document, to bypass checkpoints or to create confusion with false instructions. Check: Forgery requires materials appropriate to the document being forged, and some time. To document the character needs to have seen a Factor Check similar document before. The complexity of the Modifier document, the character’s degree of familiarity Document Type Simple (written letter) +0 with it, and whether the character needs to Moderate (business form) –2 reproduce the signature or handwriting of a Complex (checkpoint pass) –4 specific individual, provide modifiers to the Difficult (wasteland minted coin) –8 Forgery check, as shown below. Some documents require security or authorization codes, whether authentic ones or additional forgeries. The Overseer makes the character’s check secretly so the character is unsure how good his forgery.

Extreme (military or city ID) Familiarity

–16

Unfamiliar (seen once for less than a minute) Fairly familiar (seen for several minutes) Quite familiar (on hand, or studied at leisure) Forger has produced other documents of same type Document includes specific signature

forge a Time

10 min. 20 min. 1 hr. 4 hr. 24 hr. Check Modifier –4 +0 +4 +4

The Forgery skill is also used to detect someone else’s forgery. The result of the original Forgery –4 check that created the document is opposed by a Forgery check by the person who examines the document to check its authenticity. If the examiner’s check result is equal to or higher than the original Forgery check, the document is determined to be fraudulent. The examiner gains bonuses or penalties on his check as given in the table below. Condition Type of document unknown to examiner Type of document somewhat known to examiner Type of document well known to examiner Document is put through additional tests 1 Examiner only casually reviews the document 1

Examiner’s Check Modifier –4 –2 +0 +4 –2

1 Cumulative with any of the first three conditions on the table. Apply this

modifier along with one of the other three whenever appropriate.

A document that contradicts procedure, orders, or previous knowledge, or one that requires the examiner to relinquish a possession or a piece of information, can increase the examiner’s suspicion (and thus create favorable circ*mstances for the examiner’s opposed Forgery check). Try Again?: No, since the forger isn’t sure of the quality of the original forgery.

Special: To forge documents and detect forgeries, one must be able to read and write the language in question. (The skill is language-dependent.) A character can take 10 when making a Forgery check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Meticulous feat gets a +2 bonus on all Forgery checks. A character without a forgery kit takes a –4 penalty on Forgery checks. Time: Forging a short, simple document takes about 1 minute. Longer or more complex documents take 1d4 minutes per page or longer.

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Skills Gamble (Wis) “You got to know when to show ‘em, know when to hold ‘em, know when to walk away, know when to run.” Gambling is the age old art of making money through games of chance. Check: To join or start a game, a character must first pay a stake. The character sets the price of the stake if he starts the game, or the Overseer sets it if the character joins a game. Stakes run from penny-ante (1 coin) to astronomical (1000 coins). The character’s Gamble check is opposed by the Gamble checks of all other participants in the game. (If playing at a casino, the Overseer assigns the house Gamble skill modifier, since most casinos are rigged in the house’s favor). If there are many characters participating, the Overseer can opt to make a single roll for all of them, using the highest Gamble skill modifier among them and adding a +2 bonus to the check. If the character beats all other participants, he wins the stakes. Try Again?: No, unless the character wants to put up another stake. Special: A character cannot take 10 or take 20 when making a Gamble check. A character with the Confident feat gets a +2 bonus on all Gamble checks. A character with 5 ranks of Bluff gains a +2 synergy bonus to his Gamble skill. Time: A Gamble check requires 1d4 minutes.

Gather Information (Cha) Word of mouth is the most common form of information in the Wasteland—that, and a few small newspaper presses in the larger Wasteland towns. Gathering Information is asking around about an individual or organization and usually generates a few facts and a lot of rumors on the particular subject. Check: By succeeding at a skill check (DC 10) and spending 1d4+1 hours passing out money and buying drinks, a character can get a feel for the major news items in a neighborhood. This result assumes that no obvious reasons exist for information to be withheld. The higher the check result, the better the information. If the situation does not require the expenditure of money, such as befriending an individual or calling in a favor, then the character does not Type of Information DC Coin Spent1 spend any money. Rumors 10 0 Information ranges from rumors to classified, and the cost and DC increases accordingly for the type of information the character seeks to gather, as given in the table following.

General Specific Secretive Classified

15 20 30 40

1d4+1 2d6 1d10 x10 3d4 x20

1 A character can gain a +1 circ*mstance bonus for each multiple

of coins (dice rolled plus addition or multiples) spent up to a maximum of +10 except on rumors by spending the extra amount of money.

Rumors are general information that the passerby has heard in conversation, but does not actually have any facts to back it up. General information concerns local happenings, more rumors, gossip, and the like. Specific information usually relates to a particular question.

Secretive information includes facts that are not generally known to the public and requires that the character locate someone who has access to such information.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Classified information is even harder to come by and might involve some danger, either for the one asking the questions or the one providing the answer. There is a chance that someone will take note of anyone asking about restricted or protected information. Try Again?: Yes, but it takes 1d4+1 hours for each check, and characters may draw attention to themselves if they repeatedly pursue a certain type of information. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Gather Information check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Trustworthy feat gets a +2 bonus on all Gather Information checks. A character with a high reputation (50% fame) in a specific organization or town gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus when gathering information from that town or a contact of an organization. Time: A Gather Information check takes 1d4+1 hours.

Handle

Animal

(Cha)

Trained Only

Task Handle an animal “Push” an animal Teach an animal a trick Train an animal for a purpose

Time Move action Full-round action 1 week See text

DC 10 25 See text See text

With a leather jacket and a piece of jerky, any canine cannot resist becoming your friend . . . then again . . . a cattle prod works too. Handle Animal is the training of a befriended animal to perform specific tasks.

Possible tricks include, but are not limited to, the following.

Check: The time required to get an effect and the DC depend on what the character is trying to do.

Attack (DC 20): The animal attacks apparent enemies. The character may point to a particular enemy to direct the animal to attack that enemy. Normally, an animal only attacks humans and other animals. Teaching an animal to attack all creatures (including unnatural creatures such as undead and aberrations if they exist in your campaign) counts as two tricks.

Handle an Animal

This means to command an animal to perform a task or trick that it knows. If the animal is wounded or has taken any ability score damage, the DC increases by +5. If the check is successful, the animal performs the task or trick on its next action.

“Push” an Animal

To “push” an animal means to get it to perform a task, or trick, that it does not know, but is physically capable of performing. If the check is successful, the animal performs the task or trick on its next action.

Teach an Animal a Trick

The character can teach an animal a specific trick, such as “attack” or “stay,” with one week of work and a successful Handle Animal check. An animal with an Intelligence of 1 can learn a maximum of three tricks, while an animal with an Intelligence of 2 can learn a maximum of six tricks. The character can teach an animal to obey only that character. Any other person attempting to make the animal perform a trick takes a –10 penalty on his Handle Animal check. Teaching an animal to obey only the character counts as

Come (DC 15): The animal comes to the character, even if the animal normally would not do so (such as following the character onto a boat). Defend (DC 20): The animal defends the character (or is ready to defend the character if no threat is present). Alternatively, the character can command the animal to defend a specific other character. Down (DC 15): The animal breaks off from combat or otherwise backs down. Fetch (DC 15): The animal goes and gets something. The character must point out a specific object, or else the animal fetches some random object. Guard (DC 20): The animal stays in place and prevents others from approaching. Heel (DC 15): The animal follows the character closely, even to places where it normally wouldn’t go. Perform (DC 15): The animal does a variety of simple tricks such as sitting up, rolling over, and so on. Seek (DC 15): The animal moves into an area and searches for something of interest. It stops and indicates the first thing of interest it finds. What constitutes an item of interest to an animal can vary. Animals almost always find other creatures or characters of interest. To understand that it is looking for a specific object, the animal must make an Intelligence check (DC 10). Stay (DC 15): The animal stays in place waiting for the character to return. It does not challenge other creatures that come by, though it still defends itself if it needs to. Track (DC 20): The animal tracks the scent presented to it. Work (DC 15): The animal pulls or pushes a medium or heavy load.

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Skills a trick (in terms of how many tricks the animal can learn). It does not require a check; however, it increases the DC of all of the tricks the character teaches the animal by +5. If the animal already knows any tricks, the character cannot teach it to obey only that character.

Train an Animal Possible training include, but are not limited to, the following. Combat Riding (DC 20, 6 weeks): An animal trained to bear a rider into combat knows Attack, Come, Defend, Down, Guard, and Heel. An animal trained in riding may be “upgraded” to an animal trained in combat riding by spending three weeks and making a Handle Animal check (DC 20). If the animal was trained in other tricks (in addition to those provided by training the animal for riding), those tricks are completely replaced by the combat riding tricks. Fighting (DC 20, 3 weeks): An animal trained for combat knows the following tricks: Attack, Down, and Stay. Guarding (DC 20, 4 weeks): An animal trained to guard knows the following tricks: Attack, Defend, Down, and Guard. Laboring (DC 15, 2 weeks): An animal trained for heavy labor knows Come and Work. Hunting (DC 20, 6 weeks): An animal trained for hunting knows Attack, Down, Fetch, Heel, Seek, and Track. Performing (DC 15, 4 weeks): An animal trained for performing knows Come, Fetch, Heel, Perform, and Stay. Riding (DC 15; 3 weeks): An animal trained to bear a rider knows Come, Heel, and Stay.

Rather than teaching an animal individual tricks, the character can train an animal for a general purpose. Essentially, an animal’s purpose represents a pre-selected set of known tricks that fit into a common scheme. An animal can be trained for one general purpose only, though if the animal is capable of learning additional tricks (above and beyond those included in its general purpose) it may do so. Training an animal for a purpose requires fewer checks than teaching individual tricks. Try Again?: Yes. Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 when handling animals. An untrained character uses Charisma checks to handle and push animals, but he cannot teach or train animals. A character with the Animal Affinity feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Handle Animal checks.

Time: See above. Teaching or training an animal takes a number of days. The character does not have to spend the entire time training the animal; 3 hours per day is enough. (Spending more than 3 hours per day does not reduce the number of days required.) The character cannot spread the days out; if the character does not complete the training during a period of consecutive days, the effort is wasted.

Hide (Dex)

Armor Penalty

Got a secret mission? Don’t want to get caught or be seen by the guards? Then don your ninja garb and jump into the shadows. The Hide skill is used for stealth and hiding from pursuers. Check: A character’s Hide check is opposed by the Spot check of anyone who might see the character. The character can move up to half his normal speed and hide at no penalty. At more than half and up to the character’s full speed, the character takes a –5 penalty. It is practically impossible (–20 penalty) to hide while attacking, running, or charging. The hide check is also modified by the character’s size: If people are observing the character, even casually, he cannot hide. The character can run around a corner so that he is out of sight and then hide, but the others then know at least where the character went. Cover and concealment grant circ*mstance bonuses

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Size Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Medium-size

Modifier +16 +12 +8 +4 +0

Cover or Concealment Three-quarters Nine-tenths

Size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal

Modifier –4 –8 –12 –16

Circ*mstance Bonus +5 +10

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to Hide checks, as shown below. Note that a character cannot hide if he has less than one-half cover or concealment. Creating a Diversion to Hide A character can use the Bluff skill to help him hide. A successful Bluff check can give the character the momentary diversion needed to attempt a Hide check while people are aware of the character. While the others turn their attention from the character, he can make a Hide check if the character can get to a hiding place of some kind. (As a general guideline, the hiding place has to be within 1 foot for every rank the character has in Hide.) This check, however, is at a –10 penalty because the character has to move fast. Tailing A character can use Hide to tail a person in public. Using the skill in this manner assumes that there are other random people about, among whom the character can mingle to remain unnoticed. If the subject is worried about being followed, he can make a Spot check (opposed by the character’s Hide check) every time he changes course (goes around a street corner, exits a building, and so on). If he is unsuspecting, he generally gets only a Spot check after an hour of tailing. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Hide check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Stealthy feat gets a +2 bonus on all Hide checks. Time: A Hide check is an attack action.

Intimidate (Cha) Are you scared? Intimidation is the force of aggressive personality to scare an individual through presence, props, and threatening words. Check: With a successful check, a character can forcibly persuade another character to perform some task or behave in a certain way. A character’s Intimidate check is opposed by the target’s level check (1d20 + the target’s character level or Hit Dice). Any modifiers that a target may have on Will saving throws against fear effects apply to this level check. If the character succeeds, he may treat the target as friendly for 10 minutes, but only for purposes of actions taken while in the character’s presence. (That is, the target retains his normal attitude, but will chat, advise, offer limited help, or advocate on the character’s behalf while intimidated.) Circ*mstances dramatically affect the effectiveness of an Intimidate check. There are limits to what a successful Intimidate check can do. The character cannot force someone to obey his every command or do something that endangers that person’s life. If the character fails by more than 5, the target may actually do the opposite of what the character wishes.

Demoralize Opponent (Cha or Str)

You can also use Intimidate to weaken an opponent’s resolve in combat. To do so, make an Intimidate check opposed by the target’s modified level check (see above). If you win, the target becomes shaken for 1 round. A shaken character takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls, ability checks, and saving throws. You may only intimidate an opponent that you threaten in melee combat and that can see you.

Torture (Str)

The character knows the art of gathering information through inflicting pain and crushing a victim's will power. The people of the Wasteland are no longer polite and torturing is sometimes the only way to establish a close relationship.

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Skills Through torturing, the character can get almost any information from his victim as long as they speak the same language. A character must deal at least 1 point of lethal damage to a bound or helpless character to initiate a torture check and then makes an opposed Intimidate check (with STR modifier instead of CHR) against the victim’s level check (1d20 + level or hit dice + fear save modifiers). For every 5 points of damage dealt to the target, the character receives a +1 bonus to his Intimidate check. If the check is successful, then the information is revealed. If the check fails by more than 5, the tortured give the character false information, although the character will not know that the information is false as the Overseer keeps the result of the opposed check to himself. If the check fails by 10 or more, then the victim passes out from pain for 1d4 hours (or until healed). Try Again?: Optional, but not recommended because retries usually do not work. Even if the initial check succeeds, the other character can be intimidated only so far, and a retry does not help. If the initial check fails, the other character has probably become more firmly resolved to resist the intimidator, and a retry is futile. If the character fails to Intimidate (torture) a target, he may continue attempts, but the target gains a +4 bonus to oppose for each new attempt. If the target passes out from pain then that character gets a +2 bonus on his next Intimidate check when the target regains consciousness. Special: A character can take 10 when making an Intimidate check, but cannot take 20. If the character is the target of torture, he may substitute his number of ranks in Intimidate for his level in an opposed check. A character gains a +2 bonus on your Intimidate check for every size category that you are larger than your target. Conversely, the character takes a –2 penalty on your Intimidate check for every size category that you are smaller than your target. A character immune to fear cannot be intimidated, nor can non-intelligent creatures. A character with the Confident feat gets a +2 bonus on all Intimidate checks and on level checks to resist intimidation. A character with 5 ranks of Bluff gains a +2 synergy bonus to his Intimidate skill. Time: Varies. Changing another’s behavior requires at least 1 minute of interaction. Intimidating an opponent in combat is a standard action.

Investigate (Int)

Trained Only

Ah, my dear Watson, it was Professor Plum in the outhouse, with the explosives. Investigation in the Wasteland is usually left up to the law enforcement and similar organizations that protect the Wasteland. Sometimes, however, investigations are hired out to characters. Investigators make deductions based from clues found a crime scene. Check: A character generally uses Search to discover clues and Investigate to analyze them.

Analyze Clue

The character can make an Investigate check to analyze a clue. This function of the Investigate skill does not give the character clues where none existed before. It simply allows the character to extract extra information from a clue DC Circ*mstances he has found. Modifier The base DC to analyze a clue is 15. It is modified by the time that has elapsed since the clue was left, and whether or not the scene was disturbed.

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Every day since event (max modifier +10) Scene is outdoors Scene slightly disturbed Scene moderately disturbed Scene extremely disturbed

+2 +5 +2 +4 +6

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Collect Evidence

The character can collect evidentiary material and study it at a later time. To collect a piece of evidence, make an Investigate check (DC 15). If the character succeeds, the evidence is successfully collected and contained. If the character fails, the evidence is compromised, but can still be recovered with a –5 penalty on further checks. If the character fails by 5 or more, the evidence is ruined. On the other hand, if the character succeeds by 10 or more, he gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus on its checks to analyze the material. This function of the Investigate skill does not provide the character with evidentiary items. It simply allows the character to collect items he has found in a manner that best aids in their analysis later. Try Again?: Generally, analyzing a clue again does not add new insight unless another clue is introduced. Evidence collected cannot be recollected, unless there is more of it to take. Special: A character can take 10 when making an Investigate check, but cannot take 20. Collecting evidence requires an evidence kit. If the character does not have the appropriate kit, the character takes a –4 penalty on his check. A character with the Attentive feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Investigate checks. Time: Analyzing a clue is a full-round action. Collecting evidence generally takes 1d4 minutes per object.

Jump (Str)

Armor Penalty

Jump around, jump around, jump up, jump up, and get down, now jump. The Jump skill is used for jumping over and onto objects, such as debris and tables, or pitfalls. Check: The DC and the distance the character can cover vary according to the type of jump the character is attempting. The character’s Jump check is modified by his speed. The DCs specified below assume a speed of 30 feet (the speed of a typical human). If the character’s speed is less than 30 feet, he takes a penalty of –3 for every 5 feet of speed less than 30. If the character’s speed is greater than 30 feet, he gains a bonus of +2 for every 5 feet over 30. If the character has ranks in the Jump skill and succeeds on a check, the character lands on his feet (when appropriate) and can move as far as the character’s remaining movement allows. If the character attempts a Jump check untrained, the character lands prone unless he beats the DC by 5 or more. Standing from a prone position is a move action. Distance moved by jumping is counted against maximum movement in a round. A character can start a jump at the end of one turn and complete the jump at the beginning of your next turn.

Long Jump This is a horizontal jump, made across a gap such as a chasm or stream. At the midpoint of the jump, the character attains a vertical height equal to one-quarter the horizontal distance. The DC for the jump is equal to the distance jumped (in feet). The DCs for long jumps of 5 to 30 feet are given in the table below. A character cannot jump a distance greater than his normal speed. All Jump DCs covered here assume that the character can move at least 20 feet in a straight line before attempting the jump. If this is not the case, the DC for the jump is doubled.

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Long Jump Distance 5 feet 10 feet 15 feet 20 feet 25 feet 30 feet

DC1 5 10 15 20 25 30

1 Requires a 20-foot move.

Without a 20-foot move, double the DC.

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Skills If the character fails the check by less than 5, he does not clear the distance, but can make a Reflex save (DC High Jump DC 1 15) to grab the far edge of the gap. The character ends his movement grasping the far Distance edge. If that leaves the character dangling over a chasm or gap, getting up requires a 1 foot 4 move action and a Climb check (DC 15).

High Jump

This is a vertical leap, made to jump up to grasp something overhead, such as a tree limb or ledge. The DC for the jump is the height x4 (in feet). The DCs for high jumps of 1 to 8 feet are given in the table below. All Jump DCs covered here assume that the character can move at least 20 feet in a straight line before attempting the jump. If this is not the case, the DC for the jump is doubled.

2 feet 3 feet 4 feet 5 feet 6 feet 7 feet 8 feet

1 Requires a 20-foot move.

Without a running start, double the DC.

If the character succeeds on the check, he can reach the height. The character grasps the object he was trying to reach. If the character wishes to pull Creature himself up, the character can do so with a move action and a Climb check (DC Size 15). If the character fails the Jump check, he does not reach the height, and Colossal lands on his feet in the same square from which the character jumped. Gargantuan The difficulty of reaching a given height varies according to the size of the character or creature. Generally, the maximum height a creature can reach without jumping is given in the table below. (As a Medium-size creature, a typical human can reach 8 feet without jumping.) If the creature is long instead of tall, treat it as one size category smaller.

Hop Up

8 12 16 20 24 28 32

Huge Large Medium-size Small Tiny Diminutive Fine

Maximum Height 128 ft. 64 ft. 32 ft. 16 ft. 8 ft. 4 ft. 2 ft. 1 ft. 0.5 ft.

The character can jump up onto an object as tall as his waist with a Jump check (DC 10). Doing so counts as 10 feet of movement. The character does not need to get a running start to hop up (the DC is not doubled if you do not get a running start).

Jumping Down

If the character intentionally jumps from a height, he takes less damage than if the character just falls. The DC to jump down from a height is 15. The character does not have to get a running start to jump down (the DC is not doubled if the character does not get a running start). If the character succeeds on the check, he takes falling damage as if the character had dropped 10 fewer feet than he actually did. Special: Effects that increase a character’s speed also increase the character’s jumping distance, since the check is modified by the character’s speed. A character can take 10 when making a Jump check. If there is no danger associated with failing, the character can take 20. A character with the Acrobatic feat gets a +2 bonus on all Jump checks. A character with the Run feat gains a +2 competence bonus on Jump checks preceded by a 20-foot move. A character with 5 ranks of Tumble gains a +2 synergy bonus on Jump checks. Time: Using the Jump skill is either a move action or a full-round action, depending on whether the character starts and completes the jump during a single move action or a full-round action.

Knowledge (Int)

Trained Only*

This skill encompasses thirteen Knowledge categories, and the topics each one details in the shaded box below. Each category is treated as a separate skill. The number of Knowledge categories is kept purposely finite. When trying to determine what Knowledge skill a particular question or field of expertise

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falls under, use a broad interpretation of the existing categories. Do not arbitrarily make up new categories. Check: A character makes a Knowledge check to see if the character knows something. The DC for answering a question within the character’s field of study is 10 for easy questions, 15 for basic questions, and 20 to 30 for tough questions. Appraising the value of an object is one sort of task that can be performed using Knowledge. The DC depends on the scarcity of the object. On a success, the character accurately identifies the object’s value. If the character fails, he thinks it has a value higher or lower (determine randomly) than its actual value. If the character fails by 5 or more, he thinks it has a purchase DC 1d4+2 higher or lower than its actual value. The Overseer may make the Knowledge roll for the character, so he does not know whether the appraisal is accurate or not. Try Again?: No. The check represents what a character knows, and thinking about a topic a second time does not let the character know something he never knew in the first place. Special: An untrained Knowledge check is simply an Intelligence check. Without actual training, a character only knows common knowledge about a given subject. A character can take 10 when making a Knowledge check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Educated feat gets a +2 bonus on any two types of Knowledge checks. A character with 5 ranks of Craft (structural) gains a +2 synergy bonus to Knowledge (engineering). A character with 5 ranks of Craft (chemical) gains a +2 synergy bonus to Knowledge (medicine) when identifying drugs and posions. A character with 5 ranks of Treat Injury gains a +2 synergy bonus to Knowledge (medicine). A character with 5 ranks of Survival gains a +2 synergy bonus to Knowledge (geography). Time: A Knowledge check can be a reaction, but otherwise requires a full-round action. Civics: Civics is the knowledge of law, legislation, litigation, and legal rights and obligations as well as understanding of political and governmental institutions and processes. In the Wastelands, civics applies to a specific area chosen by the character as defined by the Overseer, such as the NEMO territories or individual governments like the Chi Dynasty. Engineering: Engineering is the knowledge of buildings, aqueducts, bridges, and fortifications. A character with this skill knows how to read blue prints and can tell what type of materials were used in the construction of a structure as well as the safety of a Wasteland structure. Geography: Geography covers a body of land and it environment, such as climate, terrain, inhabitants and Wasteland settlements. Characters must choose a specific region when taking this skill, such as the South-Western Wastelands (which details the Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah region). History: History covers a range of Pre-War Events, personalities, and cultures of the past, as well as new histories created after the Exodus. In the Wasteland, however, resources that detailed pre-war histories are very rare, and recalling knowledge of this history is more difficult impeding a +10 to the pre-war history DC. Medicine: Medical knowledge covers genetics, surgery procedures, and general treatment remedies. This skill can also be used to identify diseases, drugs, and poisons. Nature: Nature in the Wastelands includes knowledge of animals (includes mutated), biology, and botany of a specific area. Characters must choose a specific terrain when taking this skill (Examples: Dead Forest, Ocean, Pre-War, Underground, or Wasteland). A character can identify a creature with a skill check DC 10 + animal’s HD. Occult: The occult covers the fields of the supernatural, astrology, numerology, and similar topics. Science: Science covers the fields of astronomy, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Street*: Street covers current events in a specific region, as well as general information in that region. This knowledge skill can be used untrained. Tactics: Tactics are techniques and strategies for disposing and maneuvering forces in combat. Technology: Technology is the knowledge of current developments in devices, as well as the background necessary to identify various technological devices. Theology and Philosophy: This covers basic ethics, philosophical concepts, and the study of religious faith, practice, and experience. Underworld: Underworld is the knowledge of the underworld and events within. This can be used to gain information on criminal families, raider clans, and street gangs. Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Skills Listen (Wis) Listen is used to detect noise, whether it is through a door to see if something is on the other side, or while on guard duty to detect approaching intruders. Check: Make a Listen check against a DC that reflects how quiet the noise is that a character might hear or against an opposed Move Silently check. The Overseer may call for a Listen check by a character who is in a position to hear something. A character can also make a Listen check voluntarily if he wants to try to hear something in the character’s vicinity. The Overseer may make the Listen check in secret so that the character does not know whether not hearing anything means that nothing is there or that the character failed the check. A successful Listen check when there is nothing to hear results in the character hearing nothing.

DC –20 –10 0 5 10 15

Sound Gunfire A melee battle People talking A person in medium armor walking at a slow pace, trying not to make noise An unarmored person walking at a slow pace, trying not to make any noise A 1st-level Fast hero sneaking up on someone 1

20 A tiger stalking prey 1 30 A bird flying through the air +5 Through a door +15 Through a solid wall Condition Check Penalty Per 10 feet of distance –1 Listener distracted –5

Try Again?: A character can make a Listen 1 This is actually an opposed check; the DC given is a typical check every time he has the opportunity to hear Silently check result for such a character or creature. something in a reactive manner. As a move action, the character may attempt to hear something that he failed (or believes he failed) to hear previously.

Move

Special: When several characters are listening to the same thing, the Overseer can make a single 1d20 roll and use it for all the listeners’ skill checks. A character can take 10 or take 20 when making a Listen check. Taking 20 means the character spends 1 minute attempting to hear something that may or may not be there to hear. A character with the Alertness feat gets a +2 bonus on all Listen checks. A sleeping character can make Listen checks, but takes a –10 penalty on the checks. Time: A Listen check is either a reaction (if called for by the Overseer) or a move action (if a character actively takes the time to try to hear something).

Move Silently (Dex)

Armor Penalty

Another part of stealth, that coincides with the Hide skill. Move Silently is used generally to sneak up or past guards. Check: A character’s Move Silently check is opposed by the Listen check of anyone who might hear the character. A character can move up to half his normal speed at no penalty. At more than half speed and up to the character’s full speed, he takes a –5 penalty. It is practically impossible (–20 penalty) to move silently while attacking, running, or charging. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Move Silently check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Stealthy feat gets a +2 bonus on all Move Silently checks. Time: Move Silently is a move action.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Navigate (Int) After the Great War, navigation satellites were destroyed and the corresponding linked devices failed to function. Roads where reduced to rumble, and routes changed by the change of the landscape. Navigation through the Wasteland now is mainly done through guides and caravans, and rarely are routes mapped (there are no coins to be made through selling maps). Check: Make a Navigate check when a character is trying to find his way to a distant location without directions or other specific guidance. Generally, a character does not need to make a check to find a local street or other common urban site, or to follow an accurate map. The character might, however, make a check to wend his way through uncharted wastes or a labyrinth of underground storm drains. For movement over a great distance, make a Navigate check. The DC depends on the length of the trip. If the character succeeds, he moves via the best reasonable course toward his goal. If the character fails, he still reaches the goal, but it takes the character twice as long (the character loses time backtracking and correcting his path). If the character fails by more than 5, he travels the expected time, but only gets halfway to his destination, at which point the character becomes lost. A character may make a second Navigate check (DC 20) to regain his path. If the character succeeds, he continues to the destination; the total time for the trip is twice the normal time. If the character fails, he loses half a day before the character can try again. The character keeps trying until he succeeds, losing half a day for each failure. When faced with multiple choices, such as a branch in a tunnel, a character can make a Navigate check (DC 20) to intuit the choice that takes the character toward a known destination. If unsuccessful, the character chooses the wrong path, but at the next juncture, with a successful check, the character realizes his mistake.

Length of Trip Short (a few hours) Moderate (a day or two) Long (up to a week) Extreme (more than a week)

DC 20 22 25 28

A character cannot use this function of Navigate to find a path to a site if the character has no idea where the site is located. The Overseer may choose to make the Navigate check for the character in secret, so he does not know from the result whether the character is following the right or wrong path. A character can use Navigate to determine his position on earth without the use of any high-tech equipment by checking the constellations or other natural landmarks. The character must have a clear view of the night sky to make this check. The DC is 15. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Navigate check. A character can take 20 only when determining his location, not when traveling. A character with the Guide feat gets a +2 bonus on all Navigate checks. Time: A Navigate check is a full-round action.

Perform (Cha) This skill encompasses several categories, each of them treated as a separate skill. These categories are identified and defined as presented. Check: The character is accomplished in some type of artistic expression and knows how to put on a performance. The character can impress audiences with his talent and skill. The quality of the character’s performance depends on his check result. The Perform categories are, by far, not a complete listing of what can be found in the Wasteland, just some general guides. The Overseer can define additional performance skills.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Acting: The character is a gifted actor, capable of performing drama, comedy, or action-oriented roles with some level of skill. Dance: The character is a gifted dancer, capable of performing rhythmic and patterned bodily movements to music. Music: The character is a musician gifted with a talent for playing musical instruments and song. Oratory: The character is a storyteller gifted with a vocal stamina and flair.

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Skills Result 10 15 20 25 30

Performance Amateur performance. Audience may appreciate your performance, but is not impressed. Routine performance. Audience enjoys your performance, but it is not exceptional. Great performance. Audience highly impressed. Memorable performance. Audience enthusiastic. Masterful performance. Audience awed.

Try Again?: Not for the same performance and audience. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Perform check, but cannot take 20. A character without an appropriate instrument automatically fails any Perform (music), check he attempts with an instrument. At the Overseer’s discretion, impromptu instruments may be employed, but the performer must take a –4 penalty on the check because his equipment, although usable, is inappropriate for the skill. Every time a character takes the Creative feat, he gains a +2 bonus on checks involving two Perform skills the character designates. See the Feat Description for more information. Time: A Perform check usually requires at least several minutes to an hour or more.

Pilot (Dex)

Restricted – Trained Only

Piloting is the art of flying an airborne craft, such as a hang-glider, sky phantom plane, or black hawk copter. It is very unlikely that a character will have access to any types of airborne craft, and this skill is restricted unless the Overseer is running a campaign where training can be achieved in this field. Check: Typical piloting tasks do not require checks. Checks are required during combat, for special maneuvers, in other extreme circ*mstances, or when the pilot wants to attempt something outside the normal parameters of the vehicle. When flying, the character can attempt simple maneuvers and stunts (actions in which the pilot attempts to do something complex very quickly or in a limited space). Each vehicle’s Description includes a maneuver modifier that applies to Pilot checks made by the operator of the vehicle. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Pilot check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Vehicle Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Pilot checks. There is no penalty for operating a general-purpose fixed-wing aircraft. Other types of aircraft (heavy aircraft, helicopters, jet fighters, and spacecraft) require the corresponding Aircraft Operation feat, or else the character takes a –4 penalty on Pilot checks. Time: A Pilot check is a move action.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Profession (Wis)

85

Trained Only

Like Craft, Knowledge, and Perform, Profession is actually a number of separate skills that mimics character occupations (see Chapter 1: section 5). You could have several Profession skills, each with its own ranks, each purchased as a separate skill. While a Craft skill represents ability in creating or making an item, a Profession skill represents an aptitude in a vocation requiring a broader range of less specific knowledge. Check: You can practice your trade and make a decent living, earning about half your Profession check result in currency per week of dedicated work. You know how to use the tools of your trade, how to perform the profession’s daily tasks, how to supervise helpers, and how to handle common problems. Action: Not applicable. A single check generally represents a week of work. Try Again?: Varies. An attempt to use a Profession skill to earn an income cannot be retried. You are stuck with whatever weekly wage your check result brought you. Another check may be made after a week to determine a new income for the next period of time. An attempt to accomplish some specific task can usually be retried. Untrained: Untrained laborers and assistants (that is, characters without any ranks in Profession) earn the normal wage of the area.

Read/Write Language (None)

Trained Only

Since schools are no longer present in most non-technical towns throughout the Wastes, reading and writing skills are not so easy to learn. Only inhabitants of highly populated places can find it less problematical, but those living in the Wastelands often stay illiterate till their death. Characters know how to read and write their native language unless they take a trait or background that makes them illiterate.  Illiterate characters can learn to read and write their native language at the cost of 2 skill points.  Learning to read and write additional languages beyond the character native language costs 3 skill points per language. 

A character never makes Read/Write Language checks. A character either knows how to read and write a specific language or does not. To be able to speak a language that the character can read and write, he must take the Speak Language skill for the appropriate language.

Repair (Int)

Trained Only

Sometimes you just need the right tool and the knowledge to fix that weapon that backfired or the vehicle that you rolled. Then again, some duct tape and a swift kick to the junk works too. Check: Most Repair checks are made to fix complex electronic or mechanical devices. The DC is set by the Overseer. In general, simple repairs have a DC of 10 to 15 and require no more than a few minutes to accomplish. More complex repair work has a DC of 20 or higher and can require an hour or more to complete. Making repairs also involves a monetary cost when spare parts or new components are needed. If the Overseer decides this is not necessary for the type of repair the character is attempting, then no purchase is needed. Example Repair Task Simple (tool, simple weapon) Moderate (mechanical or electronic component) Complex (mechanical or electronic device) Advanced (cutting-edge mechanical or electronic device)

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Repair DC 15 20

Time 1 min. 10 min.

25

1 hr.

30

10 hr.

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Skills Jury-Rig

A character can choose to attempt jury-rigged, or temporary, repairs. Doing this increases the Repair check DC by 5, and allows the character to make the checks in as little as a full-round action. A jury-rigged repair can only fix a single problem with a check, however, and the temporary repair only lasts until the end of the current scene or encounter. The jury-rigged object must be fully repaired thereafter. A character can also use jury-rig to hot-wire a vehicle or jump-start an engine or electronic device. The DC for this is at least 20, and it can be higher depending on the presence of security devices. The jury-rig application of the Repair skill can be used untrained. Try Again?: Yes, though in some specific cases, the Overseer may decide that a failed Repair check has negative ramifications that prevent repeated checks. Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 on a Repair check. When making a Repair check to accomplish a jury-rig repair, a character cannot take 20. Repair requires a Snapper Super Toolkit for repairs tasks over DC 15 or a multipurpose tool for tasks of DC 15 and under. A multipurpose tool can be use on repairs over DC 15, but imposes a –2 penalty to the Repair check. If the character does not have the appropriate tools for the repair, he takes a –4 penalty on the check. A character with 5 Ranks of Craft (mechanical) or Craft (electronic) gains a +2 synergy bonus on Repair checks made for mechanical or electronic devices. A character with the Gearhead feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Repair checks. Time: See the table for guidelines. A character can make a jury-rig repair as a full-round action, but the work only lasts until the end of the current encounter.

Research (Int) Digging through the dirt? Research is the study of a particular subject, object, or person to learn specific facts and other knowledge. Check: Researching a topic takes time, skill, and some luck. The Overseer determines how obscure a particular topic is (the more obscure, the higher the DC) and what kind of information might be available depending on where the character is conducting his research. Information ranges from general to obscure or restricted. Given enough time (usually 1d4 hours) and a successful skill check, the character gets a general idea about a given topic. This assumes that no obvious reasons exist why such information would be unavailable, and that the character has a way to acquire restricted or protected information. The higher the check result, the better and more complete the information. If the character wants to discover a specific fact, date, map, or similar bit of information, add +5 to +15 to the DC. Try Again?: Yes. Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 on a Research check. A character with the Studious feat gets a +2 bonus on all Research checks. A character with 5 Ranks of Computer Use gains a +2 synergy bonus on a Research check when searching computer records for data. Time: A Research check takes 1d4 hours.

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Ride (Dex) Mount your hog and ride. Ride covers the fields of riding animals suitable of transportation, such as horses, and also covers motorcycles in the respect to maneuvers. Animals ill suited as mounts provide a –2 penalty on their rider’s Ride check. Check: Typical riding actions do not require checks. A character can saddle, mount, ride, and dismount without a problem. Mounting or dismounting is a move action. Some tasks, such as those undertaken in combat or other extreme circ*mstances, require checks. In addition, attempting trick riding or asking the animal to perform an unusual technique also requires a check. Special: If the character is riding bareback, he takes a –5 penalty on Ride checks. A character can take 10 when making a Ride check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Animal Affinity feat gets a +2 bonus on all Ride checks with animal mounts. Time: Ride is a move action, except when otherwise noted for the special tasks listed below. Guide with Knees (DC 5): The character can react instantly to guide his mount with his knees so that the character can use both hands in combat or to perform some other action. Make the check at the start of the character’s round. If the character fails, he can only use one hand this round, because the character needs to use the other to control his mount. Attempting this on a motorcycle is DC 20 and failure means the cycle crashes. Stay in Saddle (DC 5): The character can react instantly to try to avoid falling when his mount rears or bolts unexpectedly or when the character takes damage. Only the damage aspect applies to Motorcycles. Fight while Mounted (DC 20): While in combat, the character can attempt to control a mount that is not trained in combat riding (see the Handle Animal skill). If the character succeeds, he uses only a move action, and the character can use his attack action to do something else. If the character fails, he can do nothing else that round. If the character fails by more than 5, he loses control of the animal. For animals trained in combat riding, the character does not need to make this check. Instead, the character can use his move action to have the animal perform a trick (commonly, to attack). The character can use his attack action normally. On motorcycles, a character fighting from the cycle is slightly easier, only requiring a DC 10 to control the cycle as a move action and use his attack action for something else. Failure means that the character loses control of the cycle and must spend his attack action to regain control or crash. Cover (DC 15): The character can react instantly to drop down and hang alongside his mount, using it as one-half cover. The character cannot attack while using his mount as cover. If the character fails, he does not get the cover benefit. Soft Fall (DC 15): The character reacts instantly when he falls off a mount, such as when it is killed, destroyed, falls, or crashes to try to avoid taking damage. If the character fails, he takes 1d6 points of damage per 10 feet of speed moved during the fall. (Example: A character on a motorcycle going 60 crashes, and the character attempts a soft fall, but fails, and takes 6d6 points of falling / road rash damage.) Leap (DC 15): The character can get his mount to leap obstacles as part of its movement. Use the character’s Ride modifier or the mount’s Jump modifier (whichever is lower) when the mount makes its Jump check (see the Jump skill). The character makes a Ride check (DC 15) to stay on the mount when it leaps. On a Motorcycle a character requires a ramp to leap obstacles. Fast Mount or Dismount (DC 20; armor penalty applies): The character can mount or dismount as a free action. If the character fails the check, mounting or dismounting is a move action. (A character cannot attempt a fast mount or dismount unless he can perform the mount or dismount as a move action this round, should the check fail.)

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Skills Search (Int) There is an old game that the Wasteland children call “seek and destroy;” basically, someone has hidden something and you need to search it out to obtain it. Check: The character generally must be within 10 feet of the object or surface to be examined. A character can examine up to a 5-foot-by-5-foot area or a volume of goods 5 feet on a side with a single check. A Search check can turn up individual footprints, but does not allow a character to follow tracks or tell the character which direction the creature or creatures went or came from.

DC 10 20 25+

Task Ransack an area to find a certain object. Notice a typical secret compartment, a simple trap, or an obscure clue. Find a complex or well-hidden secret compartment or trap; notice an extremely obscure clue.

Scavenge Characters can make a Search check in a defined area into a Scavenge check for items of craft worthy material. A Scavenge check can be made for every one hundred by one hundred foot area of a ruined building. Check: The character makes a Search check in a ruined structure or building and finds something of value following based on his Search check as define by the chart below.

DC 15 20

Try Again: None. The character did not find anything of worth.

30

Special: Multiple characters can aid a character in a Search and Scavenge check. Each successful aid adds the normal +2 bonus, but in a Scavenge check it can also either increase the scavenged area by an additional one hundred feet per character or add the +2 circ*mstance bonus per character to the normal scavenged area.

25

35 40 45 50

Scavenge Result (examples) Bottle of Toxicola, Rations (spoiled) Ammunition, Rations (eatable), Simple Weapon, Water (low radiation) Archaic Weapon, Handgun, Material (low quality), Molotov co*cktail, SMG, Medpak Ammunition (AP), Armor (light), Drugs (any), Rad-Blocker 2, Radium X, Rifle, Shotgun, Super Medpak, Water (non-radiated) Electronic Component, Fusion Cell (1/2 charge), Material (good quality) Ammunition (heavy weapon), Armor (medium), Energy Weapon (melee), Fusion Cell (full), Grenade (any), Plastic Explosive Heavy Weapon, Material (preserved) Energy Weapon (Pistol), Energy Weapon (Rifle)

Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 when making a Search check. A character with the Meticulous feat gets a +2 bonus on all Search checks. Time: A Search check is a full-round action. A Scavenge check is at least one minute or more.

Sense Motive (Wis) “Wake up boy! Don’t you lie to me or I’ll cut ya!” Sense Motive is the ability to detect trust or mistrust, scams, and strange behavior patterns from his fellow man or mutant. Check: A successful check allows the character to avoid being bluffed (see the Bluff skill). Sense Motive does not, however, allow a character to determine whether a given statement is a lie. The character can also use the skill to tell when someone is behaving oddly or to assess someone’s trustworthiness. In addition, a character can use this skill to make an assessment of a social situation. With a successful check (DC 20), the character can get the feeling from another’s behavior that something is wrong. Also, the character can get the feeling that someone is trustworthy and honorable. Try Again?: No, though the character may make a Sense Motive check for each Bluff made on the character.

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Special: A character can take 10 when making a Sense Motive check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Attentive feat gets a +2 bonus on all Sense Motive checks. A character can use Sense Motive to detect that a hidden message is being transmitted via the Bluff skill (DC equal to the Bluff check result of the sender). If the character’s check result beats the DC by 5 or more, the character understands the secret message as well. If the character’s check fails by 5 or more, the character misinterprets the message in some fashion. Time: A Sense Motive check may be made as a reaction to another character’s Bluff check. (When that is the case, the Overseer may roll the character’s Sense Motive check in secret, so the character does not necessarily know someone is trying to bluff him.) Using Sense Motive to get a sense of someone’s trustworthiness takes at least 1 minute.

Sleight of Hand (Dex)

Trained Only; Armor Penalty

Sir, try and guess at which of these three cups hold this metal ball bearing and win a prize, only for one coin. Sleight of Hand is the art of the pickpocket and magician. It can be used to lift items from other characters as well as used for magic tricks using ones hands, like hiding a ball up your shirt sleeve. Check: A check against DC 10 lets a character palm a coin-sized, unattended object. Minor feats of sleight of hand, such as making a coin disappear, also have a DC of 10 unless an observer is concentrating on noticing what the character is doing. When a character performs this skill under close observation, the character’s skill check is opposed by the observer’s Spot check. The observer’s check does not prevent the character from performing the action, just from doing it unnoticed. When a character tries to take something from another person, the character’s opponent makes a Spot check to detect the attempt. To obtain the object, the character must get a result of 20 or higher, regardless of the opponent’s check result. The opponent detects the attempt if his check result beats the character’s check result, whether the character takes the object or not. A character can use Sleight of Hand to conceal a small weapon or object on his body. Try Again?: A second Sleight of Hand attempt against the same target, or when being watched by the same observer, has a DC 10 higher than the first check if the first check failed or if the attempt was noticed. Special: A character can take 10 when making a Sleight of Hand check, but can’t take 20. A character can make an untrained Sleight of Hand check to conceal a weapon or object, but must always take 10. A character with the Nimble feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Sleight of Hand checks. Time: A Sleight of Hand check is an attack action.

Speak Language (None)

Trained Only

The Speak Language skill does not work like a standard skill. An Exodus character can choose languages from: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Japanese, Spanish, and Tribal. 

A character automatically knows how to speak his native language; unless they take the background “Feral Child.”

Learning an additional language beyond the character native language costs 3 skill points per language.

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Skills A character never makes Speak Language checks. A character either knows how to speak and understand a specific language or does not. To be able to read and write a language that the character can speak, he must take the Read/Write Language skill for the appropriate language.

Spot (Wis) What are you blind? Open yer fricking eyeballs and look around! Check: The Spot skill is used to notice items that are not immediately obvious and people who are attempting to hide. The Overseer may call for a Spot check by a character who is in a position to notice something. A character can also make a Spot check voluntarily if he wants to try to notice something in his vicinity. The Overseer may make the Spot check in secret so that the character does not know whether not noticing anything means that nothing is there or that the character failed the check. A successful Spot check when there is not anything to notice results in the character noticing nothing. Spot is often used to notice a person or creature hiding from view. In such cases, the character’s Spot check is opposed by the Hide check of the character trying not to be seen. Spot is also used to detect someone in disguise (see the Disguise skill), or to notice a concealed weapon on another person. A character’s Spot check is modified by a –1 penalty for every 10 feet of distance between the character and the character or object he is trying to discern. The check carries a further –5 penalty if the character is in the midst of activity. Try Again?: A character can make a Spot check every time he has the opportunity to notice something in a reactive manner. As a full-round action, a character may attempt to notice something that he failed (or believe he failed) to notice previously. Special: A character can take 10 or take 20 when making a Spot check. A character with the Alertness feat gets a +2 bonus on all Spot checks. Time: A Spot check is either a reaction (if called for by the Overseer) or a full-round action (if a character actively takes the time to try to notice something).

Survival (Wis) It is really difficult to survive in the Wastelands. America is no longer the same. Check: A character can survive in the wild. With the Track feat, a character can use Survival checks to track a character or animal across various terrain types.

DC 15

15

20 25

Special: A character can take 10 when making a Survival check. A character can take 20 when tracking, or if there is no danger or penalty for failure, but not on periodic checks to get along in the wild. Survival Task The character can find enough food and water needed to survive. The character can provide food and water for one other person for every 5 points in which the character’s check result exceeds 15. The character gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus on Fortitude saves against severe weather. The character may grant the same bonus to one other character for every 5 points in which the character’s check result exceeds 15. The character avoids getting lost and avoids natural hazards, such as toxic water and quicksand. Identify if the place is radioactive by looking for its symptoms.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

A character with the Guide feat gets a +2 bonus on all Survival checks. Time: Basic Survival checks occur each day in the wilderness or whenever a hazard presents itself. When using Survival with the Track feat to track a character or animal, checks are made according to distance, as described in the Track feat.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Swim (Str)

91

Armor Penalty

The waters in the Wastelands are not exactly safe, but if you are going for a skinny dip, you best know how to swim. Check: A successful Swim check allows a character to swim one-quarter his speed as a move action or half the character’s speed as a full-round action. Roll once per round. If the character fails, he makes no progress through the water. If the character fails by 5 or more, he goes underwater. If the character is underwater (from failing a Swim check or because the character is swimming underwater intentionally), the character must hold his breath. A character can hold his breath for a number of rounds equal to the character’s Constitution score, but only if the character does nothing but take move actions or free actions. If the character takes an attack action or a full-round action, the amount of breath the character has remaining is reduced by 1 round. (Effectively, a character in combat or taking damage can hold his breath only half as long as normal.) After that period of time, the character must make a Constitution check (DC 10) every round to continue holding his breath. Each round, the DC of the check increases by 1. If the character fails the check, the character begins to drown. Water Calm water Rough water Stormy water Radiated water 1

DC 10 15 20 20

1 Character swimming is radiated

water takes damage based on the degree of radiation as detailed in Chapter 5.

The DC for the Swim check depends on the water: Each hour that the character swims, make a Swim check against DC 20. If the character fails, he becomes fatigued. If the character fails a check while fatigued, the character becomes exhausted. If the character fails a check while exhausted, the character becomes unconscious. Unconscious characters go underwater and immediately begin to drown. Try Again?: A new check is allowed the round after a check is failed.

Special: A character takes a penalty of –1 for every 5 pounds of gear he carries, including armor and weapons. A character can take 10 when making a Swim check, but can’t take 20. A character with the Athletic feat gets a +2 bonus on all Swim checks. Time: A Swim check is either a move action or a full-round action, as described above.

Treat Injury (Wis) More often than not, someone’s going to be flinging lead your way. The best way to treat a bullet hole is by treating the injury with state of the art Wasteland tech. Does anyone have a saw? Check: The DC and effect depend on the task attempted.

Heal Concussion (DC 20) With medical supplies, a character can tend to someone that suffered a concussion. A successful Treat Injury check treats the main threat of concussion if preformed within 6 hours of the concussion. A concussed character suffers a –4 to Intelligence and Wisdom, loses his Dexterity bonus, and can only make standard actions for 2d4 days. If the check fails by more than 10, the character suffers an additional –2 points of temporary Intelligence and Wisdom damage. The use of this skill consumes one use of consumable medical supplies.

Long-Term Care (DC 15)

The successful application of this skill allows a patient to recover hit points and ability points lost to temporary damage at an advanced rate— 3 hit points per character level or 3 ability points restored per day of complete rest. A new check is made each day; on a failed check, recovery occurs at the normal rate for that day of rest and care.

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Skills A character can tend up to as many patients as he has ranks in the skill. The patients need complete bed rest (doing nothing all day). The character needs to devote at least ½ hour of the day to each patient the character is caring for.

Remove Blindness (DC 25) With medical supplies and a doctors or paramedics bag, a character can tend to a blind character. The treating character can make a Treat Injury check once per day for the treated character. If the check is successful, the character regains his eyesight 24 hours later. If the check fails by more than 10 then the character is permanently blinded. The use of this skill consumes one use of consumable medical supplies.

Restore Hit Points (DC 15) With medical supplies, if a character has lost hit points, the character can restore some of them. A successful check, as a full-round action, restores 1d4 hit points. The number restored can never exceed the character’s full, normal total of hit points. This application of the skill can be used successfully on a character up to three times per day, but only once per encounter where a character receives new wounds. The use of this skill consumes one use of consumable medical supplies.

Repair Crippled Limb (DC 30) With medical supplies and a doctors or paramedics bag, a character can conduct field surgery to heal crippled limbs. The treating character can make a Treat Injury check once per week on a crippled limb. A successful check heals the crippled limb in 2d4 days of non-strenuous activity. If a check fails by more than 10, call the sawbones, the limb is permanently crippled and may need to be amputated (or it can just hang there lifeless). The use of this skill consumes three uses of consumable medical supplies.

Revive Dazed, Stunned, or Unconscious Character (DC 15) The character can remove the dazed, stunned, or unconscious condition from a character. This check is an attack action. A successful check removes the dazed, stunned, or unconscious condition from an affected character. The character cannot revive an unconscious character who is at –1 hit points or lower without first stabilizing the character.

Stabilize Dying Character (DC 15) With medical supplies, a character can tend to a character who is dying. As an attack action, a successful Treat Injury check stabilizes another character. The stabilized character regains no hit points, but he stops losing them. The character must have a medical kit to stabilize a dying character. The use of this skill consumes one use of consumable medical supplies.

Surgery (DC 20) With medical supplies and a doctors or paramedics bag, a character can conduct field surgery. This application of the Treat Injury skill carries a –4 penalty, which can be negated with the Surgery feat. Surgery requires 1d4 hours; if the patient is at negative hit points, add an additional hour for every point below 0 the patient has fallen. Surgery restores 1d6 hit points for every character level of the patient (up to the patient’s full normal total of hit points) with a successful skill check. Surgery can only be used successfully on a character once in a 24-hour period. A character that undergoes surgery is fatigued for 24 hours, minus 2 hours for every point above the DC the surgeon achieves. The period of fatigue can never be reduced below 6 hours in this fashion. The use of this skill consumes three uses of consumable medical supplies.

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Treat Disease (DC 15)

A character can tend to a character infected with a treatable disease. Every time the diseased character makes a saving throw against disease effects (after the initial contamination), the treating character first makes a Treat Injury check to help the diseased character fend off secondary damage. This activity takes 10 minutes. If the treating character’s check succeeds, the treating character provides a bonus on the diseased character’s saving throw equal to his ranks in this skill.

Treat Poison (DC 15)

A character can tend to a poisoned character. When a poisoned character makes a saving throw against a poison’s secondary effect, the treating character first makes a Treat Injury check as an attack action. If the treating character’s check succeeds, the character provides a bonus on the poisoned character’s saving throw equal to his ranks in this skill.

Treat Radiation Sickness (DC 15) A character can tend to a radiated character. When a radiated character makes a saving throw against a radiation sickness prolonging damage, the treating character first makes a Treat Injury check as an attack action. If the treating character’s check succeeds, the character provides a bonus on the radiated character’s saving throw equal to his ranks in this skill. Try Again?: Yes, for restoring hit points, reviving dazed, stunned, or unconscious characters, stabilizing dying characters, and surgery. No, for all other uses of the skill. Special: The Surgery feat gives a character the extra training he needs to use Treat Injury to help a wounded character by means of an operation. A character can take 10 when making a Treat Injury check. A character can take 20 only when restoring hit points or attempting to revive dazed, stunned, or unconscious characters. Long-term care, restoring hit points, treating disease, treating poison, or stabilizing a dying character requires a medical kit. Reviving a dazed, stunned, or unconscious character requires either a first aid kit or a medical kit. Surgery requires a surgery kit. If the character does not have the appropriate kit, he takes a –4 penalty on the check. A character can use the Treat Injury skill on his self only to restore hit points, treat disease, or treat poison. The character takes a –5 penalty on his check any time he treats himself. A character with the Medical Expert feat gets a +2 bonus on all Treat Injury checks. Time: Treat Injury checks take different amounts of time based on the task at hand, as described above.

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Skills Tumble (Dex)

Trained Only; Armor Penalty

Tumbling is an artistic form of acrobatic dance that allows a character to do spectacular feats of amazement through jumps and rolls. Check: A character can land softly when he falls, tumbles past opponents in combat, or tumbles through opponents.

Acrobatic Roll (DC 15)

When in a prone position, a character can make an acrobatic roll to move away from his opponents without provoking an attack of opportunity upon making a successful Tumble check. The DC increases by +2 for each opponent the character would provoke an attack of opportunity from. This tumbling maneuver costs double movement and the character still remains in a prone position at the end of his movement.

Kip Up (DC 25) Upon a successful tumble check, a character can perform a Kip Up from a prone position without provoking an attack of opportunity. A Kip Up is where the character brings his knees to his chest and then uses the momentum of his leg to spring to a standing position. Failure means that the character fails to Kip Up and remains in the prone position and any opponents that threaten the character gets an attack of opportunity.

Land Softly (DC 15) The character can make a Tumble check when falling. If the check succeeds, treat the fall as if it were 10 feet shorter when determining damage.

Roll and Stand (DC 20)

As part of a 5-foot movement, the character can roll from a prone position to an adjacent square and stand upon a successful tumble check. This maneuver does not provoke an attack of opportunity as the character is moving away from his opponent, unless the opponent has reach or the character stands in a threatened area.

Tumble past Opponents (DC 15)

With a successful Tumble check, the character can weave, dodge, and roll up to 20 feet through squares adjacent to opponents, risking no attacks of opportunity. Failure means the character moves as planned, but provokes attacks of opportunity as normal.

Tumble through Opponents (DC 25) With a successful Tumble check, the character can roll, jump, or dive through squares occupied by opponents, moving over, under, or around them as if they weren’t there. Failure means the character moves as planned, but provokes attacks of opportunity as normal. Try Again?: No. Special: A character with 5 or more ranks in Tumble gains a +3 dodge bonus to Defense (instead of the normal +2) when fighting defensively, and a +6 dodge bonus (instead of the normal +4) when engaging in total defense. A character can take 10 when making a Tumble check, but cannot take 20. A character with the Acrobatic feat and at least 1 rank in this skill gets a +2 bonus on all Tumble checks. Time: A character can try to reduce damage from a fall as a reaction once per fall. A character can attempt to tumble as a free action that must be performed as part of a move action.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Chapter III Feats Feats are special talents or abilities that a character learns during his transition through life. A character gains Feats based on several factors of character creation. All characters begin with two Feats as denoted in the character class Description (one for class and one for first level) and may gain a bonus Feat through a background, occupation, or trait option. At third level the character gains acquired Feats. Acquired Feats are earned every third level (or fourth level if a Ghūl or has the Gifted Trait) and multiple thereof. Additionally, class features provide a character with bonus Feats, sometimes from a specific list. So needlessly to say, an Exodus character will have many Feats to choose from the list below as they progress in levels. Some Feats have a requirement that must be met in order to obtain the Feat. These requirements range from minimum ability score requirement, skill ranks, another Feat, a minimum Base Attack Bonus or a combination of any of these requirements. Some advanced classes allow a character to take a Feat without meeting the requirements—this will be denoted in the class feature or bonus feat Description. Feat Acrobat

Requirement

Action Boy

Earlier Sequence, Heroic Surge

Adrenaline Rush

Constitution 15, Survival 4 ranks

Advance Combat Martial Arts Advanced Firearms Proficiency

Combat Martial Arts, Improved Combat Martial Arts, BAB +8

Unarmed critical hit modifier increased to x3.

Personal Firearm Proficiency

Auto-fire without penalty.

Advanced TwoWeapon Fighting

Dexterity 13, Two-Weapon Fighting, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, BAB +11

Gain a third attack with offhand at –10 penatly and may use a melee weapon in one hand and ranged in other.

Agile Riposte

Dexterity 13, Dodge

Alertness Animal Affinity Charisma 13, Animal Affinity, Handle Animal 6 ranks

Animal Friend Archaic Weapon Proficiency Armor Proficieny (heavy) Armor Proficieny (medium) Armor Proficieny (light) Athletic Attentive

Armor Proficieny (medium), Armor Proficieny (light)

Proficient in heavy armors.

Armor Proficieny (light)

Proficient in medium armors. Proficient in light armors.

Wisdom 13 , Sense Motive 4 ranks, Spot 4 ranks

Better Criticals

Weapon Focus or Weapon Finesse, BAB +8

+2 bonus to Climb and Swim skill checks. +2 bonus to Investigate and Sense Motive skill checks. Study an opponent as a standard action, and gain a +1 insight bonus to attack rolls against that opponent for the encounter. +1 to critical threat range of a weapon. Re-roll miss chance from concealment and may move half speed when unable to see.

Blind-Fight

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Make a melee or touch attack against dodge opponent if opponent misses attack. +2 bonus to Listen and Spot skill checks. +2 bonus to Handle Animals and Ride skill checks Befriend a domestic or wild animal and gain a animal companion. Proficient in archaic weapons.

Awareness

Bonus Damage

Description +2 bonus to Jump and Tumble skill checks. Restore limits of use of Heroic Surge by spending a Karma Point. When HP falls below 50%, the character gains a +2 morale bonus to attack rolls and all physical skill checks.

Ranged

Dexterity 15, Point Blank, Precise Shot

+1 to damage from ranged weapons.

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Feats Spend a move action to brace self to gain a +2 STR to firearm handling requirements +1 to unarmed attack rolls and deal 1d4+STR nonlethal damage. +2 bonus to two Craft skills checks.

Bracing Brawl Builder Wisdom 13, Personal Proficiency, Advanced Proficiency

Burst Fire

Firearm Firearm

+2 bonus to Demolitions and Disable Device skill checks. Make a free melee attack against an adjacent opponent after defeating another opponent in melee combat. As a full-round action in melee, trade up to 5 points from attack rolls to add to Defense. Deal 1d4+STR lethal or non-lethal damage with unarmed attacks. Gain additional attacks of opportunity equal to 1 + DEX modifier per round. +2 bonus to STR or DEX when opposing Grapple and Trip attacks. +3 skill points. +2 bonus to Gamble and Intimidate skill checks. +2 bonus to two Craft or Perform skills checks. Spend full-round action aiming to gain a +2 to a ranged attack roll on next attack. +2 bonus to Bluff and Disguise skill checks.

Cautious Cleave

Strength 13, Power Attack

Combat Expertise

Intelligence 13

Combat Martial Arts

BAB +1

Combat Reflexes Combat Throw

Defensive Martial Arts

Comprehension Confident Creative Dead Aim Deceptive Defensive Arts

Wisdom 13, Far Shot Martial

+1 Dodge bonus to Defense against melee attacks.

Demolition Expert

Demolitions 6 ranks

Die Hard

Endurance, Threshold

Dodge

Dexterity 13

Dodger

Dexterity 13, Dodge, Mobility

Double Tap

Dexterity 13, Point Blank Shot

Drive-By Attack

Drive 4 ranks

Earlier Sequence

Dexterity 13, Improved Initiative

Educated

Comprehension

Elusive Target

Dexterity 13, Defensive Martial Arts

Empathy

Wisdom 15, Sense Motive 5 ranks, Diplomacy 2 ranks

Improved

Damage

Endurance Exotic Firearms Proficiency Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency Explorer Far Shot Fast Shot

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Shoot single target with auto-fire at a –4 penalty and deal +2 dice of damage.

Explosive charges deal 1d6 points of additional damage. Choose to stabilize when between –1 and –9 hit points or remain consious when below 0 hit points able to use only standard actions while taking 1 point of damage per round. Pick an opponent each round to gain +1 Defense against. +1 dodge bonus to Defense Fire two bullets at a –2 penatly and deal +1 die of damage. Take no penalty when firing from moving vehicle. Gain a +2 bonus to Initiative rolls (stacks with Improved Initiative) and can act in a surpise round. +2 skill points per level Opponents firing at you in melee combat takes an additional –4 penatly to attack rolls to hit. +1 bonus on Charisma-based skill checks. Can make an opposed Sense Motive check to detrmine if a target is lying. +4 bonus to Saves against fatigue and some environmental effects.

Personal Firearm Proficiency, Advanced Firearm Proficiency

Proficient in a Exotic Weapon type.

BAB +1

Proficient in a Exotic Melee Weapon type.

Track, Survival 4 ranks

+2 bonus to Navigate and Survival skill checks. +50% range to archaic or firearm distances.

Dexterity 13, Improved Initiative, Personal Firearm Proficiency, and Quick Draw

Bonus attack at highest BAB when using full attack action with guns.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Faster Healing

Constitution 13, Toughness

Feneese

Dexterity 15+

Fleet of Foot

Run

Flower Child

Constitution 13, (medicine) 4 ranks

Knowledge

Focused Force Stop

Drive 4 ranks, Vehicle Expert

Fortune Finder

Karma 10+

Frightful Presence Gain Ability Gambler Gearhead

Charisma 15, Intimidate 9 ranks Level 6

Ghost

Hide 4 ranks, Move Silently 4 ranks, Survival 4 ranks

Great Cleave

Strength 13, Power Attack, Cleave, BAB +4

Great Fortitude Guide Gunner

Personal Firearm Proficiency, Balance 4 ranks

Harmless

Charisma 17

Healer Heave Ho! Heroic Surge Hit the Deck HtH Evade HtH Fighter

Knowledge (medicine) 5 ranks, Treat Injury 5 ranks Strength 13, Base Attack +1 Evasion Dodge, Defensive Martial Arts Strength 15, Brawl, Power Attack, Street Fighting, Base Attack +3

Improved Brawl

Brawl, BAB +3

Improved Bull Rush

Strength 13, Power Attack

Improved Combat Martial Arts Improved Combat Throw Improved Damage Threshold

Combat Martial Arts, BAB +4 Defensive Martial Throw, BAB +3

Arts,

Combat

Improved Feint

Intelligence 13, Brawl, Street Fighting

Improve Grapple

Brawl, Dexterity 13

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

+1 to attack rolls from moving vehicles. +1 bonus on Barter, Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Sense Motive and Sleight of Hand skill checks. Heal 2d4 hit points as a full-round action to a damaged character. +10 range on thrown weapons. Gain an addition attack or move action. Explosive damage is reduced by 50%, your left prone. +2 Defense in melee combat when fighting unarmed. +2 bonus to attack rolls and damage when fighting unarmed. +2 to unarmed attack rolls and deal 1d8+STR nonlethal damage. Perform a Bull Rush maneuver with provoking an attack of opportunity. Make a trip attack as an attack of opportunity against an opponent that misses you in melee combat. Increase maximum damage threshold by +3.

Intelligence 13, Combat Expertise

Improve Overrun

When resting regain HP equal to your level plus double your CON bonus. +4 to confirm critical hits Change direction up to 90 degrees once when running or charging. +2 bonus to Fortitude against drug addiction and effects. +2 bonus to Balance and Concentration skill checks. Can force another vehicle to a stop with a sideswipe. +2 bonus to Craft (salvage) and Search (salvage) skill checks. Cause opponents to become shaken. +1 to one ability score of choice. +2 bonus to Bluff and Gamble skill checks. +2 bonus to Computer Use and Repair skill checks. Gain a +2 bonus on Hide and Move Silently skill checks and three-quarters cover when hiding at night or in dimly lit areas. Make a free melee attack against an adjacent opponent after defeating another opponent in melee combat. If that opponent falls in combat, you gain another attack, and so on. +2 bonus on Fortitude saving throws. +2 bonus on Navigate and Survival skill checks.

Unarmed attack threat range increases to 19-20/x2

Improved Disarm

Improve Initiative Improve Knockout Punch

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Brawl, Knockout Punch, BAB +6 Power Attack, Strength 13

Perform a Disarm maneuver without provoking an attack of opportunity. Can make a Bluff (feint) check as a move action, and gain a +2 bonus on the skill check. Initiate a Grapple maneuver without provoking an attack of opportunity and gain a +4 bonus to grapple checks. Gain a +4 bonus to Initiative rolls. Deal triple damage from your first unarmed attack to a flat-footed opponent. Target cannot avoid you on an Overrun and +4 STR bonus to knock down opponent.

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Feats Improve Trip

Intelligence 13, Combat Expertise

Improve TwoWeapon Fighting

Dexterity 13, Two-Weapon Fighting, BAB +6

Iron Will Karma Beacon

Level 5

Knockout Punch

Brawl, BAB +3

Lead Foot Life Giver

Drive 8 ranks Level 3, Toughness

Light Step

Dexterity 15

Lightning Reflexes Living Anatomy Low Profile Magnetic Personality Medic Medical Expert Meticulous Mobility More Criticals Mr. Fixit

Knowledge (medicine) Treat Injury 10 ranks

10

ranks,

Presence, Level 6 Knowledge (medicine) 1 ranks Knowledge (medicine) 1 ranks Dexterity 13, Dodge Base attack +12, Better Criticals, Weapon Focus or Weapon Finesse Knowledge (science) 4 ranks

Mutate! Mysterious Stranger

Karma 6+

Negotiator Night Vision Nimble Pack Rat Pathfinder Personal Proficiency Pickpocket

Explorer, Track, Survival 4 ranks Firearm

+1 to critical threat range of a weapon. +2 bonus on Repair and Disable Device checks and also reduce the DC of any repair by current INT bonus. Change a starting Trait. Spend a Karma Point in combat and have a mysterious man dressed in black come to your aid. +2 bonus to Barter and Diplomacy skill checks. Gain low-light vision. +2 bonus on Escape Artist and Sleight of Hands skill checks. +2 bonus on STR to determine Carrying Capacity total. Reduce travel time by 10%. Proficient in personal firearms.

Point Blank Shot Power Attack

Strength 13

Precise Shot

Point Blank Shot

Presence Pyromaniac

Weapon Focus (fire-based)

Quick Draw Quick Pockets Quick Recovery

BAB +1

Quick Reload

BAB +1

Rad Child

Fortitude Base +3

Rad Resistance

Constitution 13, Toughness

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

Perform a Trip attack without provoking an attack of opportunity. Gain a second attack with your off-hand at a –5 penalty and may use a melee weapon in one hand and ranged in other. +2 bonus to Will saving throws. +1 Karma Point Deal double damage from your first unarmed attack to a flat-footed opponent. +20 speed to fuel cell land-based vehicles. +2 hit points per level. +2 Defense and Reflex saves against ground-based traps, landmines, and pitfalls. +2 bonus to Reflex saving throws +4 bonus on Treat Injury and Knowledge (medicine) skill checks. Increase critical range of weapon by 1 point against targets that can be critically hit. Double healing effects. Only gain 50% of earned Reputation. Gain loyal companion and followers. +2 bonus on Treat Injury checks and Knowledge (Medicine) checks . +2 bonus on Craft (chemical) and Treat Injury skill checks. +2 bonus on Forgery and Search checks. Gain a +4 Defense against attacks of opportunity.

+3 bonus to Sleight of Hand skill checks. Deal +1 bonus to attack and damage rolls on range attack within 30 feet of target. Reduce you melee attack roll up to your BAB to increase your damage by the same number. Shoot at opponents engaged in melee combat without penalty. +2 bonus to Diplomacy and Intimidate skill checks. +2 bonus attack and damage rolls with fire-based weapons. Draw a weapon as a free action. Retrieve a piece of equipment as a free action. Stand from a prone position as a free action. Reload ammunition clips as a free action or loose ammunition move action. Immune to Radiation exposure of 600 RAD and lower. +4 Fortitude bonus against radiation and radiation sickness.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Explorer, Pathfinder, Track, Survival 8 ranks

Ranger Renown Run Shot on the Run Simple Proficiency

Dexterity 13, Point Blank Shot, Dodge, Mobility

Weapon Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot

Spring Attack

Dexterity 13, Dodge, Mobility, BAB +4

Stealthy Strafe

Personal Firearm Proficieny, Advanced Firearm Proficiency

Street Fighting

Brawl, BAB +2

Strong Back

Strength 13

Stunt Man

Strength 13, Dexterity 15, Balance 4 ranks, Jump 4 ranks, Tumble 4 ranks

Stonewall Studious Surface Operation Surgery

Strength 13, Power Attack Vehicle

Thief

Auto-fire in a line 4 squares long 1 square wide. Deal an extra 1d4 points of damage with unarmed attacks or with a light weapon once per round. +4 bonus to STR checks when dragging/pushing or lifting and to carrying capacity. Falls are treated as 20 feet less and damage from falls is reduced to d4’s instead of d6’s. +4 bonus to oppose trip attacks or attacks/effects that would move or knock the character prone. +2 bonus to Decipher Script and Research skill checks. Perform a Sunder attack on an opponent’s weapon or armor without provoking an attack of opportunity. Pick a vehicle type in which to be proficient.

Treat Injury 4 ranks Pickpocket, Dexterity 13, Bluff or Intimidate 4 ranks

Can perform Treat Injury (surgery) without penalty. +1 bonus on all Disable Device, Hide, Move Silently and Sleight of Hand checks. +3 Hit Points. Can find and follow tracks over a DC 10. +2 bonus to Diplomacy and Gather Information skill checks. Fight with two weapons with penalties and the weapons must be the same type, melee or firearms. Pick an opponent during your action and that opponent cannot add his Strength modifier to his attack roll. While driving, pick an opponent or vehicle as a dodge opponent and everyone in your vehicle gains a +1 to Defense. +2 bonus to Drive checks. Use Dexterity modifier instead of Strength on attack rolls. Gain a +1 bonus on attacks with a chosen weapon.

Trustworthy Two-Weapon Fighting

Dexterity 13

Unbalance Opponent

Defensive Martial Arts, BAB +6

Vehicle Dodge

Dexterity 13, Drive 6 ranks, Vehicle Expert

Vehicle Expert

Surface Vehicle Operation

Weapon Finesse

Proficient with weapon, BAB +1

Weapon Focus

Proficient with weapon, BAB +1 Dexterity 13, Intelligence 13, Dodge, Mobility, Spring Attack, Combat Expertise, BAB +4

Windfall

Bounce bullet off object to hit target behind cover at a –2 penatly and deal +1 die of damage. Move before and after a melee attack not to exceed your move speed. +2 bonus on Hide and Move Silently skill checks.

Drive 4 ranks

Toughness Track

Whirlwind Attack

+1 bonus to all Hide, Move Silently, Listen, Navigate, Search, Spot, and Survival skill checks when in the wilderness of the Wastelands. Gain +1% to Reputation earned. When running move 5 times your base speed, or times 4 speed if in heavy armor. Move before and after a ranged attack not to exceed your move speed. You are proficient in simple weapons.

Skip Shot

Sunder

99

As a full round action, attack all adjacent opponents. Gain 100 coins multiplied by the character’s level and a +1 bonus to profession skill checks.

A character gains an “Acquired Feat” at 1 st level, 3rd level, and every multiple of three thereafter (6th, 9th, 12th, 15th, and 18th). Some characters, however, do not receive these acquired Feats at 3rd level and multiple thereof, such as the Ghūl race and characters taking the “Skilled” trait option, whom gain their Feats at 4th level and every multiple of 4 afterwards (8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th). A Ghūl can offset his acquired Feat penalty with the trait “Fear the Reaper,” however, read the trait Description.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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100 Feats Characters also gain bonus Feats based on level advancement class abilities, and during background, occupation, and trait options at character creation. An Exodus character can choose any Feat listed in this guide, other Exodus d20 books, or “feats” from the d20 Modern Core Rulebook as long as the character meets all the prerequisites of a Feat. Most of the Feats from the computer series are presented in one form or another (Advanced Class, Talent, or Trait) in this guide. Some of the Feats though, are being reserved for future Exodus supplements; and additionally, some of the Feats are the same as a feat in d20 modern.

Acrobatic You have the genetic makeup of a monkey and will do flips and tricks for food. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Jump checks and Tumble checks. Special: Remember that the Tumble skill cannot be used untrained.

Action Boy

Action is what you love. When the bullets fly overhead, blood flows, and sweat forms on your brow, you are in your element. Prerequisites: Earlier Sequence, Heroic Surge Benefit: This Feat functions as the Heroic Surge feat. The character can, however, spend a Karma Point to refresh his times per day limitation once he has expended his limit. The character can use this Feat as often as he wants as long as he has the Karma Points to Spend.

Adrenaline Rush Your adrenaline pumps into overdrive when near death. Prerequisites: Constitution 15, Survival 4 ranks. Benefit: When HP falls below 50%, the character gains a +2 morale bonus to attack rolls and all physical skill checks. Special: The effect of the Adrenaline Rush lasts for the number of minutes equal the character's Constitution bonus.

Advanced Combat Martial Arts They call you Bruce! You have superior Kung Fu skills. Prerequisites: Combat Martial Arts, Improved Combat Martial Arts, base attack bonus +8. Benefit: When the character scores a critical hit on an opponent with an unarmed strike, the character deals triple damage. Normal: An unarmed strike critical hit deals double damage.

Advanced Firearms Proficiency

Gunning down a group of people is even easier now that you have learned to control your burstfires. Prerequisite: Personal Firearms Proficiency. Benefit: The character can fire any personal firearm on auto-fire without penalty (provided, of course, that it has an auto-fire setting). Normal: Characters without this feat take a –4 penalty on attack rolls made with personal firearms set on auto-fire.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Advanced Two-Weapon Fighting

You bring the term double-fisting action to a new level. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Two-Weapon Fighting, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, base attack bonus +11. Benefit: The character gets a third attack with his offhand weapon, albeit at a –10 penalty. This feat also allows the character to use a melee weapon in one hand and a ranged weapon in the other.

Agile Riposte

Father Nelson instructed you as a young child about strange people touching you. So now when your opponents attempt to feel you up, you know how to retaliate. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Dodge. Benefit: Once per round, if the opponent the character has designated you as his dodge target, (see the Dodge feat) and makes a melee attack or melee touch attack against the character and misses, the character may make an attack of opportunity against that opponent. Resolve and apply the effects from both attacks simultaneously. Even a character with the Combat Reflexes feat cannot use the Agile Riposte feat more than once per round. This feat does not grant more attacks of opportunity than the character is normally allowed in a round.

Alertness Your senses have mutated better than your fellow man. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Listen checks and Spot checks.

Animal Affinity Animals are your friends, and warm up to you more easily. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Handle Animal checks and Ride checks. Special: Remember that the Handle Animal skill cannot be used untrained.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

2

102 Feats Animal Friend You are a lost member of the Pet Environment Testing Association (PETA). You enjoy skipping through the dead forests looking for a furry companion, to hug and squeeze and call George or just make into a killing machine. Prerequisites: Charisma 13, Animal Affinity, Handle Animal 6 ranks. Benefit: Animals are strangely attracted to the character. Domestic animals are friendly towards the character, while wild animals are indifferent. The character can attempt to befriend a normal animal with a Handle Animal skill check (DC 18 + Animal’s Hit Dice for domestic / DC 28 + Animal’s Hit Dice for wild). If the check is successful the character gains an animal friend.

Character Level 1–3 4–6 7–9 10 – 12 13 – 15 16 – 18 19 – 20

Animal Maximum Hit Dice Character level Character level –1 Character level –2 Character level –3 Character level –4 Character level –5 Character level –6

A character may benefit from only one animal friend at a time as multiple animals get jealous and fight each other to the death. The animal friend hit dice are based on the character’s level (as denoted on the chart below). When training his animal friend to learn tricks, or a specific purpose, the character gains a +3 bonus to the Handle Animal skill check. Special: Character with the Beastmaster background gains an additional +2 bonus (+5 total bonus) to the Animal Handle check and may also attempt to befriend mutated animals at a DC 23 + Animal’s Hit Dice.

Archaic Weapons Proficiency You are proficient in the weapons of the medieval times and military melee weapons. Benefit: The character takes no penalty on attack rolls when using any kind of archaic weapon. Normal: A character without this feat takes a –4 non-proficient penalty when making attacks with archaic weapons.

Armor Proficiency (heavy)

You are proficient in wearing heavy armors. Prerequisites: Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium). Benefit: See Armor Proficiency (light). Normal: See Armor Proficiency (light).

Armor Proficiency (light)

You are proficient in wearing light armors. Benefit: When a character wears a type of armor with which he is proficient, the character gets to add the armor’s equipment bonus to his Defense. Also, the armor check penalty applies only to Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, and Tumble checks. Normal: A character who wears armor with which he is not proficient adds only the armor’s non-proficient equipment bonus to his Defense. Also, he suffers its armor check penalty on attack rolls and on all skill checks that involve moving.

Armor Proficiency (medium) You are proficient in wearing medium armors. Prerequisite: Armor Proficiency (light). Benefit: See Armor Proficiency (light). Normal: See Armor Proficiency (light).

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Athletic

You have trained all of your life for the Wasteland Olympics. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Climb checks and Swim checks.

Attentive

You pay a little more attention to details. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Investigate checks and Sense Motive checks. Special: Remember that the Investigate skill cannot be used untrained.

Awareness The character can perform an examination of an animal, Ghūl, human, mutant, or sentient plant to find its weaknesses and learn how dangerous it is. Prerequisites: Wisdom 13, Sense Motive 4 ranks, Spot 4 ranks. Benefit: You must study an opponent as a full-round action to gain the benefit from this Feat. After successfully studying the opponent, you gain a +1 insight bonus to attack rolls against that opponent for the duration of the encounter. Special: A character can take this Feat up to three times. Each time a character takes this Feat, he can study an additional opponent during his full-round action and gain the benefits against multiple studied opponents for the duration of the encounter.

Better Critical You have perfected the art of using your weapon to hit the right spot to make your target spew lots of blood everywhere. Prerequisites: Base attack +8, Weapon Focus or Weapon Finesse Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus to the critical threat range of a single weapon or a finesse group. Special: A character may take this Feat more than once applying it to a different weapon or finesse group.

Bonus Ranged Damage

You enjoyed shooting a Red Ryder BB gun and throwing rocks at empty Toxicola bottles as a child, but with the time you have learnt that the most important lesson in the world is: When fighting and your ammo run lows, hurt is coming your way. So best to make every shot count. Prerequisites: Dexterity 15, Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot. Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus to damage whenever he is using ranged weapons.

Blind-Fight All of those years of staring at the sun and the Wasteland sand have made it easier to combat opponents when you are blinded. Benefit: In melee combat, every time the character misses because of concealment, the character can re-roll the miss chance roll one time to see if the character actually hits. The character takes only half the usual penalty to speed for being unable to see. Darkness and poor visibility in general reduces the character’s speed to three-quarters of normal, instead of one-half.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

2

104 Feats Bracing You know how to lock your legs into the tripod position to better use large firearms that would normally be mounted. Benefit: When handing large firearms from a standing position, you gain a +2 Strength bonus to overcome the STR requirement to wield the firearm properly. You must spend a move action to properly brace yourself in order to gain this benefit.

Brawl When it comes down to a scrap, you know how to throw a punch and pull hair. Benefit: When making an unarmed attack, the character receives a +1 competence bonus on attack rolls, and the character deals non-lethal damage equal to 1d4 + his Strength modifier. The character’s unarmed attacks count as armed, which means that opponents do not get attacks of opportunity when the character attacks them unarmed. The character may make attacks of opportunity against opponents who provoke such attacks. Normal: Unarmed attacks normally deal non-lethal damage equal to 1d3 + Strength modifier and the character is not considered armed for proposes combat maneuvers or attacks of opportunity.

Builder By reading the Rad-Tek Guide to Building, you have increased your building skills and are ready to go rebuild civilization with the other worker drones. Benefit: Pick two of the following skills: Craft (chemical), Craft (electronic), Craft (mechanical), and Craft (structural). The character gets a +2 bonus on all checks with those skills. Special: The character can select this feat twice. The second time, the character applies it to the two skills he didn’t pick originally. Remember that Craft (chemical), Craft (electronic), and Craft (mechanical) cannot be used untrained.

Burst Fire

Gunning down individuals is even easier now that you have learned to control your burst-fires to a single target. Prerequisites: Wisdom 13, Personal Firearms Proficiency, Advanced Firearms Proficiency. Benefit: When using an automatic firearm with at least five bullets loaded, the character may fire a short burst as a single attack against a single target. The character receives a –4 penalty on the attack roll, but deals +2 dice of damage. Firing a burst expends five bullets and can only be done if the weapon has five bullets in it. Normal: Auto-fire uses ten bullets, targets a 10-foot-by-10-foot area, and cannot be aimed at a specific target. Without this feat, if a character attempts an auto-fire attack at a specific target, it simply counts as a normal attack and all the extra bullets are wasted. Special: If the firearm has a three-round burst setting, firing a burst expends three bullets instead of five and can be used if the weapon has only three bullets in it.

Cautious After seeing Fred blow off his fingers setting up explosives, you pay a little more attention to details when setting up or disarming weapons of mass destruction. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Demolitions checks and Disable Device checks. Special: Remember that the Demolitions skill and the Disable Device skill cannot be used untrained.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Cleave

Your skill in melee fighting is so great that when you down an opponent, others nearby are shocked by your skill, which allows you to gain a bonus attack. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Power Attack. Benefit: If the character deals an opponent enough damage to make the opponent drop (either by knocking the opponent out due to massive damage or by reducing the opponent’s hit points to less than 0), the character gets an immediate extra melee attack against another opponent adjacent to the character. The character cannot take a 5-foot step before making this extra attack. The extra attack is with the same weapon and at the same bonus as the attack that dropped the previous opponent. The character can use this ability once per round.

Combat Expertise

You have learned how to shuffle your feet to the rhythm of the war drum during combat to dodge attacks. Prerequisite: Intelligence 13. Benefit: When the character uses the attack action or the full attack action in melee, the character can take a penalty of up to –5 on his attack roll and add the same number (up to +5) to the character’s Defense. This number may not exceed the character’s base attack bonus. The changes to attack rolls and Defense last until the character’s next action. The bonus to the character’s Defense is a dodge bonus (and as such it stacks with other dodge bonuses the character may have). Normal: A character without the Combat Expertise feat can fight defensively while using the attack or full attack action to take a –4 penalty on attacks and gain a +2 dodge bonus to Defense.

Combat Martial Arts Judo Chop! You have mastered the basics of aggressive martial arts. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: With an unarmed strike, the character deals lethal or non-lethal damage (the character’s choice) equal to 1d4 + the character’s Strength modifier. The character’s unarmed attacks count as armed, which means that opponents do not get attacks of opportunity when the character attacks them unarmed. The character may make attacks of opportunity against opponents who provoke such attacks. Normal: Without this feat, a character deals only 1d3 points of non-lethal damage. Unarmed attacks normally provoke attacks of opportunity, and unarmed combatants cannot normally make attacks of opportunity.

Combat Reflexes

When your opponent exposes his backside, you hit him in the rear. Benefit: The maximum number of attacks of opportunity the character may make each round is equal to the character’s Dexterity modifier + 1. The character can still only make one attack of opportunity on a single opponent. With this feat, the character may also make attacks of opportunity when flat-footed. Normal: A character without the Combat Reflexes feat can make only one attack of opportunity per round and cannot make attacks of opportunity when flat-footed. Special: The Combat Reflexes feat does not allow a character with the Opportunist talent to use that talent more than once per round.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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106 Feats Combat Throw You have learned how to turn an opponent’s weight against them. Prerequisite: Defensive Martial Arts. Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus on opposed Strength and Dexterity checks any time the character attempts trip or grapple attacks, or when the character tries to avoid a trip or grapple attack made against him.

Comprehension A strange shaped fruit fell from a tree and hit you in the head. Now some things come easier to you. Benefit: After taking this Feat the character immediately gains +3 skill points to spend.

Confident You have learned the stance to scare your opponents. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Gamble checks and Intimidate checks, and on level checks to resist intimidation.

Creative

The Wasteland radiation has given you visions through dream to better craft your creative skills.

Benefit: Pick two of the following skills: Craft (visual art or writing), Perform (acting, dance, music, or oratory). The character gets a +2 bonus on all checks with those two skills. Special: A character can select this feat as many as three times. Each time, the character selects two new skills from the choices given above.

Dead Aim

Through dedicated practice you have learnt how to shoot a blood fly off of a pile of Bison cakes.

Prerequisites: Wisdom 13, Far Shot. Benefit: Before making a ranged attack, the character may take a full-round action to line up your shot. This grants the character a +2 circ*mstance bonus on his next attack roll. Once the character begins aiming, he cannot move, even to take a 5-foot step, until after the character makes his next attack, or the benefit of the feat is lost. Likewise, if the character’s concentration is disrupted or the character is attacked before his next action, the character loses the benefit of aiming.

Deceptive

In a foreign tongue, your name translates into Loki.

Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Bluff checks and Disguise checks.

Defensive Martial Arts

The Rad-Tek guide to becoming a wasteland Kung-Fu master has taught you some simple steps in defense; Wax-on, wax-off. Benefit: The character gains a +1 dodge bonus to Defense against melee attacks. Special: A condition that makes the character lose his Dexterity bonus to Defense also makes the character lose dodge bonuses. Also, dodge bonuses stack, unlike most other types of bonuses.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Demolition Expert

Since you started to play with explosives you have been looking for a way to make them even more dangerous. You have learnt what types of substances are the most dangerous ones and recently you have discovered the interesting effect of adding a few nails to the finished charge. Prerequisites: Demolitions 6 ranks Benefit: Explosive charges set by the character deal an additional +1d6 point of damage.

Diehard

You have a high threshold for pain. Prerequisite: Endurance, Improved Damage Threshold. Benefit: When reduced to between –1 and –9 hit points, you automatically become stable. You do not have to roll d% to see if you lose 1 hit point each round. When reduced to negative hit points, you may choose to act as if you were disabled, rather than dying. You must make this decision as soon as you are reduced to negative hit points (even if it is not your turn). If you do not choose to act as if you were disabled, you immediately fall unconscious. When using this Feat you can take either a single move or standard action each turn, but not both. Also, you cannot take a full round action. You can, however, take a move action without further injuring yourself, but if you perform any standard action you take 1 point of damage after completing the act. If you reach –10 hit points, you immediately die. Normal: A character without this Feat who is reduced to between –1 and –9 hit points is unconscious and dying.

Dodge You were not good enough to join the Rad-Tek Dodge Ball team, but you did learn how to dodge a wrench. Prerequisite: Dexterity 13. Benefit: During the character’s action, the character designates an opponent and receives a +1 dodge bonus to Defense against any subsequent attacks from that opponent. The character can select a new opponent on any action. Special: A condition that makes the character lose his Dexterity bonus to Defense also makes the character lose dodge bonuses. Also, dodge bonuses stack with each other, unlike most other types of bonuses.

Dodger You have studied the official Rad-Tek Wasteland Survival Guide to Dodge Ball, and now you are a quick little bastard that can dodge anything. Prerequisites: Dodge, Mobility Benefit: You are quick on your feet, and gain a +1 dodge bonus to your Defense. Special: A character may take this Feat multiple times. There is no limit.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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108 Feats Double Tap You are quick on the trigger. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Point Blank Shot. Benefit: When using a semiautomatic firearm with at least two bullets loaded, the character may fire two bullets as a single attack against a single target. The character receives a –2 penalty on this attack, but deals +1 die of damage with a successful hit. Using this feat fires two bullets and can only be done if the weapon has two bullets in it.

Drive-By Attack

You are the king of the road and have perfected the art of wasteland Road Rage.

Benefit: The character takes no vehicle speed penalty when making an attack while in a moving vehicle. Also, if the character is the driver, he can take his attack action to make an attack at any point along the vehicle’s movement. Normal: When attacking from a moving vehicle, a character takes a penalty based on the vehicle’s speed. Passengers can ready an action to make an attack when their vehicle reaches a particular location, but the driver must make his attack action either before or after the vehicle’s movement.

Earlier Sequence You are able to use mistakes made by your opponents to strike first. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Improved Initiative Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus to Initiative rolls (which stacks with Improved Initiative) and can act in a surprise round.

Educated

You have already been hit in the head with a strange fruit that opened your eyes. Now you have taken to eating crumpets and drinking tea with the civilized folk. Prerequisites: Comprehension Benefit: The character gains +2 skills points to his character class or advanced class base skill points each time he advances a character level. These bonus skill points are not retroactive. The character begins gaining the bonus skill points at the level he takes the Educated Feat, not for any levels before.

Elusive Target

When your personal space is being crowded, you use the crowd as friendly cover. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Defensive Martial Arts. Benefit: When fighting an opponent or multiple opponents in melee, other opponents attempting to target the character with ranged attacks take a –4 penalty. This penalty is in addition to the normal –4 penalty for firing into melee, making the penalty to target to character –8. Special: An opponent with the Precise Shot feat has the penalty lessened to –4 when targeting the character.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Empathy

You are more sensitive to conspiracy theories, suspicious behaviors, and detecting lies. You have learned to read body language and can tell exactly when someone is not telling the truth. Prerequisites: Wisdom 15, Sense Motive 5 ranks, Diplomacy 2 ranks. Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus on any Charisma-based skill checks when reading body language. Additionally the character can make an opposed Sense Motive vs. Bluff check to determine if a target is lying or withholding the truth. Normal: The character using Sense Motive skill without this feat cannot exactly tell when the target is lying.

Endurance You have spent many days in the Wasteland training and building up your immunity against Wasteland dangers. Benefit: The character gains a +4 bonus on the following checks and saves: hourly Swim checks to avoid becoming fatigued, Constitution checks to continue running, Constitution checks to hold the character’s breath, Constitution checks to avoid damage from starvation or thirst, Fortitude saves to avoid damage from hot or cold environments, and Fortitude saves to resist suffocation or drowning. Also, the character may sleep in medium or light armor without becoming fatigued. Normal: A character without this feat that sleeps in armor is automatically fatigued the following day.

Exotic Firearms Proficiency Exotic Firearms proficiency covers all firearms that are not listed under personal firearms. Choose a weapon type from the following list: energy firearm (energy/plasma pistols and rifles), flamethrowers, heavy firearms (mini guns and large or mounted machine guns), or propelled launchers (grenade/rocket launcher). Once a character chooses a firearm type, he is proficient with those types of exotic firearms. Prerequisites: Personal Firearms Proficiency, Advanced Firearms Proficiency. The Overseer can create additional categories or require each firearm as a separate exotic firearm feat as needed to the designs of his campaign.

Benefit: The character makes attack rolls with the weapon normally. Normal: A character who uses a weapon without being proficient with it takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls. Special: A character can gain this feat as many as four times. Each time a character takes the feat, he selects a different weapon group.

Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency Exotic Melee proficiency covers all melee weapons that are not listed under simple or archaic weapons. A character gains one exotic melee weapon of his choice and becomes proficient with that melee weapon in combat. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: The character makes attack rolls with the weapon normally. Normal: A character who uses a weapon without being proficient with it takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls. Special: A character can gain this feat multiple times. Each time the character takes the feat, he selects a different exotic melee weapon.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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110 Feats Explorer The Wasteland is a big place with lots of danger, but that does not deter you. After all you are a rumored descendant of both Lewis and Clark. Prerequisites: Track, Survival 4 ranks. Benefit: The character gains +2 bonus to Navigate and Survival skill checks when traveling through the Wasteland.

Far Shot By calculating the wind speed of a European swallow against the glare of the sun, divided by the pitch of the horizon, you can shoot farther than others. Benefit: When the character uses a firearm or archaic ranged weapon, its range increment increases by one-half (multiply by 1.5). When the character throws a weapon, its range increment is doubled.

Fast Shot

You know how to empty your guns far faster than a normal shooter. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Improved Initiative, Personal Firearm Proficiency, and Quick Draw. Benefit: The character gains one additional attack at his highest Base Attack Bonus with guns when using the full-round attack action. Because the character shoots faster, he scores less critical hits, taking a –4 penalty to the d20 roll to confirm the critical. Special: A character cannot benefit from Finesse when using Fast Shot.

Faster Healing Some people bleed to death from their wounds, not you though. Your blood clots like a beaver damning up a river. Prerequisites: Constitution 13, Toughness Benefit: You naturally heal a number of hit points per day equal to the standard healing rate + double your Constitution bonus. You heal even if you do not rest. This healing replaces your normal natural healing. If someone with the Treat Injury skill tends you successfully, you instead regain double the normal amount of hit points + double your Constitution bonus.

Finesse

Your attacks show style and flare even if they are sometimes impractical. (This trait cannot be taken with the Fast Shot trait)

Prerequisites: Dexterity 15 Benefit: The character gains a +4 bonus to confirm critical hits, but deals –1 damage on all attacks.

Fleet of Foot

You can turn corners without losing momentum. Prerequisite: Run Benefit: When running or charging, you can make a single direction change of 90 degrees or less. You cannot use this feat while wearing medium or heavy armor, or if you are carrying a medium or heavy load. Normal: Without this feat, you can run or charge only in a straight line.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Flower Child

Some people want to forget, some want to party, there are many reasons to use drugs. For some reason, however, you have built up a resistant to drugs, maybe because your parental units were wasteland hippies. Prerequisites: Constitution 13, Knowledge (medicine) 4 ranks, Suffered Drug Addiction. Benefit: The character gets +2 bonus to Fortitude against drug addiction. Special: A character can gain this Feat up to three times, each time gaining an additional +2 bonus, to a maximum of +6.

Focused

You possess a keen mind to remain focused on the tasks at hand. Benefit: The character gets get a +2 bonus on all Balance checks and Concentration checks.

Force Stop

After viewing a NAZCAR (National Association of Z-Fusion-Powered Car Auto Racing) magazine, you have learned how to put your fellow Wasteland Racers into the wall. Prerequisites: Drive 4 ranks, Vehicle Expert. Benefit: When the character attempts a sideswipe stunt with a surface vehicle, the character can force the other vehicle to a stop by nudging it into a controlled sideways skid. In addition to the normal requirements for attempting a sideswipe stunt, the character must have sufficient movement remaining to move a number of squares equal to the character’s turn number. After succeeding on the check to attempt the sideswipe, the character makes a Drive check opposed by the other driver. If the character succeeds, turn the other vehicle 90 degrees across the front of the character’s, so that they form a tee. Move them forward a distance equal to the character’s turn number. The vehicles end their movement at that location, at stationary speed, and take their normal sideswipe damage. If the character fails the check, resolve the sideswipe normally.

Fortune Finder Some call it luck, others call it a keen eye. Whatever it is you posses the ability to always find something interesting or to make a rare find. Benefit: When scrounging for salvage, the character gains a +2 bonus on the Search (scavenge) checks to find objects or material and a +2 bonus to Craft (salvage) checks to extract materials.

Frightful Presence Some call you a stone cold killer; others call you one ugly mother scratcher —whatever the case, you fill your opponents with fear. Prerequisites: Charisma 15, Intimidate 9 ranks. Benefit: When the character uses this feat, all opponents within 10 feet who have fewer levels than the character must make a Will saving throw (DC 10 + ½ the character’s level + the character’s Charisma modifier). An opponent who fails his save is shaken, taking a –2 penalty on attack rolls, saves, and skill checks for a number of rounds equal to 1d6 + the character’s Charisma modifier. The character can use the feat once per round as a free action. A successful save indicates that the opponent is immune to the character’s use of this feat for 24 hours. This feat does not affect creatures with an Intelligence of 3 or lower. If the character has the Renown feat, the Will saving throw’s DC increases by 5.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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112 Feats Gain Ability You have discovered a great potential in one aspect of your mind and body. Prerequisites: Level 6 Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus point to a single ability score of his choice. Special: This feat can be taken once for each ability score.

Gambler

You know when to fold them, you know when show them, you know when to walk away, you know when to run. Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus to Bluff and Gamble skill checks when participating in gambling or games of chance.

Gearhead

Most people dream of a beautiful woman, but you, you dream of components and gears! The closest you are going to get to a girl is dressing up your wrench like a wench. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Computer Use checks and Repair checks. Special: Remember that the Computer Use skill and the Repair skill can only be used untrained in certain situations.

Ghost

Darkness is your friend and you know how to embrace it. Under the cover of night or poor lighting you know how to sneak more effectively, passing through the enemy ranks like a ghost. Prerequisites: Stealthy, Hide 4 ranks, Move Silently 4 ranks, Survival 4 ranks Benefit: The character gains three-quarters cover when hiding during the night or in dim lit areas and also gains a +2 bonus on Hide and Move Silently skill checks (this stacks with the bonus gained from Stealthy for a total bonus of +4). Special: The bonus to Hide check given by regular cover applies normally.

Great Cleave Let the bodies hit the floor! Your ability to shock your opponents when you slay one of them has increased to all opponents within arm’s reach. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Power Attack, Cleave, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: As Cleave, except that the character has no limit to the number of times he can use it per round.

Great Fortitude As a child you bathed in raw sewage and radioactive waste, now you reap the benefits. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Fortitude saving throws.

Guide

The Wasteland does not show pity to those that do not know the way; fortunately you do know, thanks to the Rad-Tek Wasteland Survival Guide. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Navigate checks and Survival checks.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Gunner

Whether from a vehicle pulled by Bison or a vehicle fueled by energy cells, you have honed your abilities to shoot targets while riding shotgun. Prerequisites: Personal Firearm Proficiency, Balance 4 ranks Benefit: The character gains +1 bonus to attack rolls with firearms made from moving vehicles.

Harmless People of the Wasteland trust you, whether it is your innocent demeanor or that winning smile, only you know. Prerequisites: Charisma 17. Benefit: NPCs are more trusting of the character since he seems harmless, making it easier for the character to gather items and information. The character gains a +1 bonus on Barter, Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Sense Motive and Sleight of Hand skill checks.

Healer

You possess a natural talent for healing others. Prerequisites: Knowledge (Medicine) 5 ranks, Treat Injury 5 ranks. Benefit: The character using Treat Injury skill can heal up to 2d4 hit points to a damaged character as a full-round action. The number restored can never exceed the character’s full normal total of hit points. This feat can be used once per day per target. Normal: Using Treat Injury skill to restore lost hit points gives only 1d4 hit points per full-round action. Also this skill can be successfully used only once per day.

Heave Ho! If baseball existed in the Wasteland, you would have been drafted as an outfielder. You do not necessarily throw better, but you can throw farther. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Base Attack +1 Benefit: The character can throw projectile objects and weapons farther than the normal range increment. All weapons thrown from the character gain a +10 to the range increments.

Heroic Surge A hero in the Wasteland takes many forms, but generally follows the basic guidelines put forth by the Thespians’ Guide to Theatrics and Stunts: “He’s gotta be strong, he’s gotta be fast, he’s gotta be fresh from the fight and he’s gotta be larger than life.” Benefit: The character may take an extra move action or attack action in a round, either before or after the character’s regular actions. The character may use Heroic Surge a number of times per day depending on his character level (as shown below), but never more than once per round.

Hit the Deck

Character Level 1st–4th 5th–8th 9th–12th 13th–16th 17th–20th

Times per Day 1 2 3 4 5

Experience has taught you to roll with the punches. Whenever you hear an explosion, you dive for to the ground for cover. Prerequisites: Evasion Benefit: Any explosive damage that the character is caught in is reduced by 50%. The character, however, dives for cover and is left in a prone position after the blast.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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114 Feats HtH Evade Training in the martial arts has made you agile against an opponent’s attacks. You know how to block your opponent’s attack with your body. Prerequisites: Dodge, Defensive Martial Arts Benefit: The character gets a +2 dodge bonus to Defense in melee combat when fighting unarmed.

HtH Fighter

Fight clubs, pub brawls, and everyday fights for money and equipment have made you a really vicious fighter. You know where to strike to inflict more pain and what techniques to use to kill your opponent. Prerequisites: Strength 15, Brawl, Improved Brawl, Power Attack, Street Fighting, Base Attack +6. Benefit: The character gains an additional +2 bonus to attack and damage rolls whenever he is fighting unarmed. This Feat stacks with the Improved Brawl Feat. The character has a total of +4 to attack rolls and deals 1d8 + STR +4 points of damage.

Improved Brawl You have mastered the art of the barroom brawl increasing your brawling knowledge with eye gouges and foot stomps. Prerequisites: Brawl, base attack bonus +3. Benefit: When making an unarmed attack, the character receives a +2 competence bonus on his attack roll, and the character deals non-lethal damage equal to 1d8 + the character’s Strength modifier. Normal: Unarmed attacks normally deal non-lethal damage equal to 1d3 + Strength modifier.

Improved Bull Rush

When push comes to shove, you know how to rush in and knock your opponents back a step.

Prerequisites: Strength 13, Power Attack. Benefit: When the character performs a bull rush, the character does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the defender.

Improved Combat Martial Arts Your limbs have hardened through intense Kung Fu training, making them as hard as bricks. Prerequisites: Combat Martial Arts, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: The character’s threat range on an unarmed strike improves to 19–20. Normal: A character without this feat threatens a critical hit with an unarmed strike only on a 20.

Improved Combat Throw When an opponent is overconfident and takes a swing and misses, you use his momentum to kick out his feet and make him eat dirt. Prerequisites: Defensive Martial Arts, Combat Throw, base attack bonus +3. Benefit: In melee combat, if an opponent attacks and misses the character, the character may immediately make a trip attack against the opponent. This counts as an attack of opportunity, which the character can make even if he is unarmed. Attacking unarmed in this way does not provoke an attack of opportunity. Special: This feat does not grant the character more attacks of opportunity than he is normally allowed in a round.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Improved Damage Threshold You can take a hit and then some.

Benefit: The character increases his massive damage threshold by 3 points. Normal: A character without this feat has a massive damage threshold equal to his current Constitution score. With this feat, the character’s massive damage threshold is current Con +3. Special: A character may gain this feat multiple times. Its effects stack.

Improved Disarm

As a child, the other children didn’t share their wasteland toys with you. So now, you take away everyone toys. Prerequisites: Intelligence 13, Combat Expertise. Benefit: The character does not provoke an attack of opportunity when the character attempts to disarm an opponent, nor does the opponent get a chance to disarm the character.

Improved Feint

“Look! Railroad tracks!” You have learned how to distract you opponents to gain an opening in combat. Prerequisites: Intelligence 13, Brawl, Street Fighting. Benefit: The character can make a Bluff check in combat as a move action. The character receives a +2 bonus on Bluff checks made to feint in melee combat. Normal: Feinting in combat requires an attack action.

Improved Grapple

You are skilled at grappling opponents and placing the smackdown on them. Prerequisites: Brawl, Dexterity 13. Benefit: You do not provoke an attack of opportunity when you make a touch attack to start a grapple. You also gain a +4 competence bonus on all grapple checks (regardless of whether you started the grapple). Normal: Characters without this feat provoke an attack of opportunity when they initiate a grapple.

Improved Initiative You are quick to act; leaving opponents bloodied lying in the dust. Benefit: The character gets a +4 circ*mstance bonus on initiative checks.

Improved Knockout Punch “Mama, said knock you out!” You have learned the wind up punch to deliver a devastating blow to an unwary opponent. Prerequisites: Brawl, Knockout Punch, base attack bonus +6. Benefit: When making the character’s first unarmed attack against a flat-footed opponent, treat a successful attack as a critical hit. This critical hit deals triple damage. The damage is non-lethal damage. Special: Even if the character has the ability to treat unarmed damage as lethal damage, the damage from a knockout punch is always non-lethal.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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116 Feats Improved Overrun You are skilled at a one-man trample on weak opponents. Prerequisites: Power Attack, Strength 13. Benefit: When you attempt to overrun an opponent, the target may not choose to avoid you. You also gain a +4 competence bonus on the Strength check to knock down your opponent. Normal: Without this feat, the target of an overrun can choose to avoid you or to block you.

Improved Trip You enjoy knocking your opponents down and making your opponents eat radiated sand. Prerequisites: Intelligence 13, Combat Expertise. Benefit: The character does not provoke an attack of opportunity when the character tries to trip an opponent while the character is unarmed. If the character trips an opponent in melee combat, the character immediately gets to make a melee attack against that opponent as if the character had not used his attack action for the trip attempt.

Improved Two-Weapon Fighting

They call you the Shredder, as you mow down opponents with both hands. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Two-Weapon Fighting, base attack bonus +6. Benefit: The character gets a second attack with his offhand weapon, albeit at a –5 penalty. Also, this feat allows the character to use a melee weapon in one hand and a ranged weapon in the other. Normal: Without this feat, a character can only get a single extra attack with an off-hand weapon, and both weapons must be of the same type (either both ranged weapons or both melee weapons).

Iron Will

You have a strong mind that cannot be broken without at lot of effort, unless you are jacked up on drugs. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Will saving throws.

Karma Beacon You are not exactly sure if all the people around you are fools or you are some kind of messiah, but almost always you get what you want. Prerequisites: Level 5. Benefit: The character gains a bonus Karma Point to use at each level when his Karma Points refresh.

Knockout Punch To an unwary opponent, your punches are like getting hit with a brick. Prerequisites: Brawl, base attack bonus +3. Benefit: When making the character’s first unarmed attack against a flat-footed opponent, treat a successful attack as a critical hit. This damage is non-lethal damage. Special: Even if the character has the ability to treat unarmed damage as lethal damage, the damage from a knockout punch is always non-lethal.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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Lead Foot

Blood of a race car driver runs in your veins. You have a need for speed, put the pedal to the metal, and run over anything that gets in the way. Prerequisites: Drive 8 ranks Benefit: The character gains a +20 speed to the movement of a fuel cell operated land-based vehicles.

Life Giver You have been blessed by the almighty himself with increase life force. Prerequisites: Level 3, Toughness. Benefit: The character gains +2 hit points to his character class or advanced class base hit die each time he advances a character level. These bonus hit points are not retroactive. The character begins gaining the bonus hit points at the level he takes the Life Giver Feat, not for any levels before.

Light Step You have always walked softly, maybe it was the fact you did not have shoes until your adult years. Prerequisites: Dexterity 15 Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus to Defense and Reflex saves against ground-based traps, landmines, and pitfalls.

Lightning Reflexes After chasing Wasteland chickens for food, you have developed chicken-like fast reflexes. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Reflex saving throws.

Living Anatomy As a child you played at a destroyed medical facility. Of course everything there was plundered, besides the medical books. Since nobody cares for books, you took them and began to learn from them. It was even more interesting when you started to understand the structure of your own body from all those colorful pictures. Prerequisites: Knowledge (Medicine) 10 ranks, Treat Injury 10 ranks Benefit: The character gains a +4 bonus on Knowledge (Medicine) and Treat Injury skill checks. Additionally the character knows the weak points of the human anatomy and gains a +1 bonus to any weapon’s critical threat range that singly targets a human, Ghūl, or Trans-Genetic Mutant. This means area of effect and blast radius effects do not receive the increased threat bonus. Finally the character can use the Treat Injury skill to increase the healing effects of patients treated under long-term care. These effects are doubled as long as the character provides longterm care to the patients.

Low Profile

You stay under the radar and do not lay claim to doing deeds. Benefit: The character gains only ½ of any reputation (fame or infamy) gained.

Danny Millard (order #2632202)

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118 Feats Magnetic Personality You have that magnetic personality that attracts other to yourself. A few wasteland wanderers view you as a natural leader of the Wastes and want to follow you. Prerequisite: Presence, Level 6 Benefits: Having this Feat enables the character to attract loyal companions and devoted followers. See the table below for what sort of companion and how many followers the character can recruit.

Character’s Reputation

Modifier

Fame 10% (any category) Infamy 10% (any category) Fame 25% (any category) Infamy 20% (any category)

+1 –1 +2 –2

The Character. . . Recruits a cohort of different ethics or religion Recruits a cohort of different race Caused the death of a companion * Cumulative per cohort killed.

Modifier –1 –3 –2*

Magnetic Personality Modifiers: Several factors can affect a character’s Magnetic The Leader . . . Modifier Personality score, causing it to vary from the Has a stronghold, base of operations, or the like +2 base score (character level + Cha modifier). A Wanders the wastes a lot –1 character’s reputation (from the point of view of Caused the death of other followers –1 the companion or follower he is trying to attract) raises or lowers his Magnetic Magnetic Companion —— Number of Followers Personality score: Other modifiers may apply when the character tries to attract a companion: Followers have different priorities from companions. When the character tries to attract a new follower, use any of the following modifiers that apply. Magnetic Personality Score: A character’s base Magnetic Personality score equals his level plus any Charisma modifier. In order to take into account negative Charisma modifiers, this table allows for very low Magnetic Personality scores, but the character must still be 6th level or higher in order to gain the Magnetic Personality Feat. Outside factors can affect a character’s Magnetic Personality score, as detailed above.

Personality Score

1 or lower 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25+

Level

— 1st 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd 4th 5th 5th 6th 6th 7th 8th 8th 9th 9th 10th 11th 11th 12th 12th 13th 14th 14th 15th

by Level —— 1st — — — — — — — — — 1 2 4 6 8 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 50 60 70 80

2nd — — — — — — — — — — — — 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5 6 8 10

3rd — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5

4th — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3

5th — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 1 1 1 1 2 2 2

Companion Level: The character can attract a companion of up to this level. Regardless of a character’s Magnetic Personality score, he can only recruit a companion who is two or more levels lower than himself. The companion should be equipped with gear appropriate for its level. A character can try to attract a companion of a particular race, class, ethics, or religion. The companion ethics may not be opposed to the leader’s on the good-vs.-evil axis. Companions earn XP as follows: The companion does not count as a party member when determining the party’s XP. Divide the companion’s level by the level of the character with whom he is associated (the character with the Magnetic Personality Feat who attracted the companion).

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Multiply this result by the total XP awarded to the character and add that number of experience points to the companion’s total. If a companion gains enough XP to bring it to a level one lower than the associated PC’s character level, the companion does not gain the new level—its new XP total is 1 less than the amount needed attain the next level. Number of Followers by Level: The character can lead up to the indicated number of characters of each level. Followers are similar to companions, except they are generally low-level NPCs. Because they are generally five or more levels behind the character they follow, they are rarely effective in combat. Followers do not earn experience and thus do not gain levels. When a character with Magnetic Personality attains a new level, however, the player consults the table above to determine if he has acquired more followers, some of which may be higher level than the existing followers. (You do not consult the table to see if your companion gains levels, however, because companions earn experience on their own.)

Medic

You have learnt the basics of first aid and you want to help all the suffering people or at least you want to make money that way. Prerequisites: Knowledge (medicine) 1 rank. Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus on all Treat Injury and Knowledge (medicine) skill checks.

Medical Expert

You have trained with a Wasteland doctor and have gleaned some of his knowledge in treating people and making remedies. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Craft (chemical) checks to creating pharmaceutical drugs and Treat Injury checks. Special: Remember that the Craft (chemical) skill can’t be used untrained.

Meticulous

You are thorough in making sure that task at hand is perfect. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Forgery checks and Search checks.

Mobility

You carefully watch your opponent’s actions while casually strolling past them. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Dodge. Benefit: The character gets a +4 dodge bonus to Defense against attacks of opportunity provoked when the character moves out of a threatened square. Special: A condition that makes a character lose his Dexterity bonus to Defense also makes the character lose dodge bonuses. Also, dodge bonuses stack with each other, unlike most other types of bonuses.

More Critical You have better perfected the art of using your weapon to hit the right spot to make your target spew lots of blood everywhere. Prerequisites: Base attack +12, Better Critical, Weapon Focus or Weapon Finesse Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus the critical threat range (for a total bonus of +2) of one of his Better Critical weapons or finesse groups. Special: A character may take this Feat more than once applying it to a different Better Critical weapon or finesse group.

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120 Feats Mr. Fixit You were amazed when a piece of junk you were playing with started to work. With time you started to understand how to connect various mechanical parts and to make use of them. Now it is even easier for you to get junk to work. Prerequisites: Craft (Mechanical) 4 ranks. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Repair and Disable Device checks and also reduces the DC of any repair by the number equal his current Intelligence bonus.

Mutate!

The radiation of the Wasteland has mutated you.

Benefit: One of your traits has mutated into something else. The character may change one of his chosen starting traits to another trait.

Mysterious Stranger

There is a legend of a lone man wandering through the Wasteland. The people say that this Stranger always appears from nowhere and helps those he is interested in. Of course he does not do this for free and always comes back for his debts. Prerequisites: Karma Points 6+. Benefit: When the character is in dire need of help in combat, he can spend a Karma Point to call a mysterious man dressed in black to come to his aid. The Overseer controls the Mysterious Man and determines his level as well as the debt the character will owe him at a later time. Special: If the character’s Karma Points fall beneath 6 he no longer qualifies for this Feat until his points reach 6 or higher again. If the Mysterious Stranger dies in an encounter that he is called to, then the character can no longer benefit from this Feat unless selecting the Feat a second time.

Negotiator

You always had a way with words and could talk your way out of situations and get the best bargains from the corner store merchant. Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus on all Barter and Diplomacy skill checks.

Night Vision

Who needs night vision goggles? Not you. You see almost as good at night as during the day. Benefit: The character gains low-light vision as detailed in the d20 Modern Core Rulebook.

Nimble Living on the streets as a child, you have learned in order to eat you had to be quick when snatching food, and nimble during the escape. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Escape Artist checks and Sleight of Hand checks. Special: Remember that the Sleight of Hand skill cannot be used untrained.

Pack Rat

After years of moving from one building to the next, you know how to pack all of your belongings in an easy to carry sack. Benefit: The character knows how to pack and carry equipment. He gains a +2 Strength bonus to his Carrying Capacity total (this does not include lifting or dragging totals).

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Pathfinder

From years of wandering the Wasteland, you have charted all of the shortcuts and paths between towns. Prerequisites: Explorer, Track, Survival 4 ranks Benefit: The character reduces traveling time between destinations by 10%.

Personal Firearms Proficiency

You have learned how to shoot a pistol, shotgun, and rifle without putting your eye out or otherwise injuring yourself. Benefit: The character can fire any personal firearm without penalty. Normal: Characters without this feat take a –4 penalty on attack rolls made with personal firearms.

Point Blank Shot

When at very close range, you shoot the target better. Benefit: The character gets a +1 bonus on attack and damage rolls with ranged weapons against opponents within 30 feet.

Power Attack You have a poor batting average, but when you do connect it is a home run. Prerequisite: Strength 13. Benefit: On the character’s action, before making attack rolls for a round, the character may choose to subtract a number from all melee attack rolls and add the same number to all melee damage rolls. This number may not exceed the character’s base attack bonus. The penalty on attacks and bonus on damage applies until the character’s next action.

Precise Shot

You can target an individual in a crowd of people. Prerequisite: Point Blank Shot. Benefit: The character can shoot or throw ranged weapons at an opponent engaged in melee without penalty. al: A character takes a –4 penalty when using a ranged weapon to attack an opponent who is engaged in melee combat.

Presence

You demand attention from those around you by the actions you make, whether it is putting a bullet to the brainpan or some inspiring verse. Those around you are either attracted to you or nervous by your presence. Benefit: The character gains a +2 bonus to Diplomacy and Intimidate skill checks.

Pickpocket

You have sticky fingers. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13 Benefit: The character gains a +3 bonus to Sleight of Hands skill checks.

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122 Feats Pyromaniac “Fire, Fire, Fire!!!” You like fire. Fire gives you a warm meal during a cold night and makes your shelter more comfortable. More importantly Fire gives you pleasure. No matter what is burning: a house, a vehicle or a living creature. You enjoy watching it. You enjoy it so much that often you are the one making things burn. Prerequisites: Weapon Focus (weapon with fire descriptor). Benefit: +2 bonus to attack and damage rolls with weapons with fire descriptors.

Quick Draw When Wasteland Bart Black calls you out for a wasteland showdown, you are quick to draw your smoke wagon and plug him full of holes. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: The character can draw a weapon as a free action. A character with this feat may throw weapons at his full normal rate of attacks. Normal: A character can draw a weapon as a move action. If a character has a base attack bonus of +1 or higher, the character can draw a weapon as a free action when moving.

Quick Pockets

Your hands are a finely tuned instrument of retrieving destruction. You remember where you put any piece of equipment on your body. Benefit: The character can retrieve a single piece of equipment or item that is in his pack, pocket, or on himself as a free action. Normal: Retrieving a piece of equipment or item counts as a move action.

Quick Recovery

The opposition cannot keep you down. When you get knocked down, you get up again. You are quick to get back on your feet from a prone position. Benefit: The character can stand from a prone position as a free action that provokes an attack of opportunity or can attempt to perform a Tumble (Kip Up) check at a DC 20. Normal: Standing from a prone position is a move action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Performing a Tumble (Kip Up) check is a DC 25.

Quick Reload You are quick to load your ammo, so you can get back to the killings. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: Reloading a firearm with an already filled box magazine or speed loader is a free action. Reloading a revolver without a speed loader, or reloading any firearm with an internal magazine, is a move action. Normal: Reloading a firearm with an already filled box magazine or speed loader is a move action. Reloading a revolver without a speed loader, or reloading any firearm with an internal magazine, is a full-round action.

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Rad Child

You have heard the stories of people dying from radiation, but it did not deter you any from bathing in vats of radioactive waste. Prerequisites: Fortitude Base +3 Benefit: Effects of Radiation are reduced on the character. The character is immune to Radiation exposure of 600 RAD and lower.

Rad Resistance

30% of people died directly from the nuclear explosions, the rest died slowly from the radiation. You are a lucky one, gaining tolerance to radiation better than other Wasteland survivors. Prerequisites: Constitution 13, Toughness. Benefit: The character gets +4 bonus to Fortitude against radiation and its effects.

Ranger Years of exploring the Wastelands and the “Wasteland Survival Guide” by Rad-Tek has hardened you and honed your senses towards the Wasteland environment. Prerequisites: Explorer, Pathfinder, Track, Survival 8 ranks. Benefit: The Wasteland is the character’s second home. He gains a +1 bonus to all Hide, Move Silently, Listen, Navigate, Search, Spot, and Survival skill checks when in the Wastelands. This benefit only applies to outdoor Wasteland environments, not while in cities, settlements, military bases, ruins, underground, or similar settings.

Renown

You claim deeds that you did not even do! Benefit: When the character gains Reputation (fame or infamy), he gains +1% to the reputation earned.

Run You have spent years training for the Wasteland Triathlon running with the Bison’. Benefit: When running, the character moves a maximum of five times his normal speed instead of four times. If the character is in heavy armor, the character can move four times his speed rather than three times. If the character makes a long jump, the character gains a +2 competence bonus on his Jump check.

Shot on the Run You have learned to shoot your target while mobile. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Point Blank Shot, Dodge, Mobility. Benefit: When using an attack action with a ranged weapon, the character can move both before and after the attack, provided that the character’s total distance moved is not greater than his speed.

Simple Weapons Proficiency

You are proficient with simple weapons. Benefit: The character makes attack rolls with simple weapons normally. Normal: A character without this feat takes the –4 non-proficient penalty when making attacks with simple weapons.

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124 Feats Skip Shot Through a turn of luck you learned how to bounce bullets and knives off of objects to damage your opponents. Prerequisites: Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot. Benefit: If the character has a solid, relatively smooth surface on which to skip a bullet (such as a street or a concrete wall), and a target within 10 feet of that surface, the character may ignore cover between the character and the target. The character, however, receives a –2 penalty on his attack roll, and the character’s attack deals –1 die of damage. Special: The surface does not have to be perfectly smooth and level; a brick wall or an asphalt road can be used. The target can have no more than nine-tenths cover for a character to attempt a skip shot.

Spring Attack All of those tango lessons are paying off. You can now dance your way to your opponent, slap him, then two-step back. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Dodge, Mobility, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: When using an attack action with a melee weapon, the character can move both before and after the attack, provided that the total distance moved is not greater than the character’s speed. Moving in this way does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the defender the character is attacking (though it can provoke attacks of opportunity from others, as normal). A character cannot use this feat if he is carrying a heavy load or wearing heavy armor.

Stealthy Your favorite color is black and you like to sneak up and scare people. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Hide checks and Move Silently checks.

Strafe Got a lineup of prisoners waiting to be executed? Now it is easier to take them all out in one action, since you have learned more auto-fire control. Prerequisites: Personal Firearms Proficiency, Advanced Firearms Proficiency. Benefit: When using a firearm on auto-fire, the character can affect an area four 5-foot squares long and one square wide (that is, any four squares in a straight line). Normal: A firearm on auto-fire normally affects a 10-foot-by-10-foot area. Street Fighting Prerequisites: Brawl, base attack bonus +2. Benefit: Once per round, if the character makes a successful melee attack with an unarmed strike or a light weapon, the character deals an extra 1d4 points of damage.

Strong Back

That internship at junkyard paid off. You know how to move heavy objects without using all of your strength. With a proper grip, correct posture, and a bit of smartness, you can lift and move almost everything. Prerequisites: Strength 13. Benefit: The character gains a +4 bonus to Strength checks when carrying, dragging, lifting, and pushing on his Carrying Capacity total.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Stunt Man

While camping near a canyon, you caught a pre-war action movie being shown to slaves by Slavers. You found it really interesting and soon you started to repeat those crazy stunts by yourself. You are not sure how it is that you are still alive. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Dexterity 15, Balance 4 ranks, Jump 4 ranks, Tumble 4 ranks. Benefit: The character has learned how to fall from short distances without taking damage. When the character falls, his distance of the fall is treated as 20 feet less and the damage die for each 10 feet of a fall is reduced to a d4. Normal: A character takes 1d6 points of damage for every 10 feet of a fall.

Stonewall You are one tough hombre. You are built like a brick wall and it takes a lot of force to move you or knock you off of your feet. Benefit: The character gets a +4 bonus to oppose bullrush, overrun, and trip attacks as well as any other attacks or effects that would move the character or knock the character prone.

Studious While searching through some trash you found a decoder ring in an old box of snack food and a book on conspiracy theory. With the book and ring nothing will get by you. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Decipher Script checks and Research checks.

Sunder

Sometimes a weapon in the hands of the enemy is just too dangerous and needs a good whacking to put it out of commission. Prerequisites: Strength 13, Power Attack. Benefit: When the character strikes an object held or carried by an opponent, such as a weapon, the character does not provoke an attack of opportunity. The character gains a +4 bonus on any attack roll made to attack an object held or carried by another character. The character deals double normal damage to objects, whether they are held or carried or not. Normal: A character without this feat incurs an attack of opportunity when he strikes at an object held or carried by another character. Surface Vehicle Types

Surface Vehicle Operation No matter what you are driving you are king of the road, baby! Nobody can stop you. Select a class of surface vehicle as denoted on the outline selection below and the character is proficient at operating that class of vehicle. Prerequisite: Drive 4 ranks. Benefit: The character takes no penalty on Drive checks or attack rolls made when operating a surface vehicle of the selected class. Normal: Characters without this Feat take a –4 penalty on Drive checks made to operate a surface vehicle that falls under any of these classes, and to attacks made with vehicle weapons. Special: A character can gain this feat as many as six times. Each time the character takes the Feat, he selects a different class of surface vehicle.

Bikes: This is your basic motorcycles. Boats: These include small boats such as jet skis, powerboats, rowboats, and sailboats. Constructions: These are your basic construction vehicles such as bull dozers and dump trucks. Four-Wheeler: These are your standard 4 wheeled vehicles such as cars, dune buggies, jeeps, and small trucks. Heavy Duty: These are your armor and other large vehicles such as hummers, RVs, and semi-trucks. Military: These are advanced vehicles of destruction such as tanks. Watercrafts: These are large ship, such as yachts and large ships that require a crew to operate.

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126 Feats Surgery Before they can say, “He’s dead Jim!” you bust out your saw and trauma kit and attempt to reconstruct the wounded. Prerequisite: Treat Injury 4 ranks. Benefit: The character can use the Treat Injury skill to perform surgery without penalty. See the Treat Injury skill Description. Normal: Characters without this feat take a –4 penalty on Treat Injury checks made to perform surgery.

Thief

After hearing of the Thieves’ Guild of the Wasteland, you have honed your abilities in quest to be a member.

Prerequisites: Pickpocket, Dexterity 13, Bluff or Intimidate 4 ranks. Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus on all Disable Device, Hide, Move Silently and Sleight of Hand skill checks.

Toughness

You are one tough hombre and know you can take a little extra in a fight.

Benefit: The character gains +3 hit points times his Toughness Feat rank. Special: A character may gain this feat up to nine times (for a maximum total bonus of 135 HP). Each time this Feat is taken the character gains 3 times the Feat rank in bonus hit points. (Example: Frank takes the toughness Feat for the third time and gains 9 (3x3) bonus hit points.)

Track

You have the nose of a bloodhound and can sniff out any foe. Benefit: To find tracks or follow them for one mile requires a Survival check. The character must make another Survival check every time the tracks become difficult to follow. The character moves at half his normal speed (or at the character’s normal speed with a – 5 penalty on the check, or at up to twice the character’s speed with a –20 penalty on the check). The DC depends on the surface and the prevailing conditions. Very Soft: Any surface (fresh snow, thick dust, wet mud) that holds deep, clear impressions of footprints.

Tracking Conditions Every three targets in the group being tracked Size of targets being tracked: 1 Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Every 24 hours since the trail was made Every hour of rain since the trail was made Fresh snow cover since the trail was made Poor visibility: 2 Overcast or moonless night Moonlight Fog or precipitation Tracked target hides trail (and moves at half speed)

+8 +4 +2 +1 +0 –1 –2 –4 -8 +1 +1 +10 +6 +3 +3 +5

1 For a group of mixed sizes, apply only the modifier for the largest size category

represented. 2 Apply only the largest modifier from this category.

Soft: Any surface soft enough to yield to pressure, but firmer than wet mud or fresh snow, in which the quarry leaves frequent but shallow footprints.

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DC Modifier –1

Surface Very soft Soft Firm Hard

Track DC 5 10 15 20

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Firm: Most normal outdoor or exceptionally soft or dirty indoor surfaces. The quarry might leave some traces of its passage, but only occasional or partial footprints can be found. Hard: Any surface that does not hold footprints at all, such as bare rock, concrete, metal deckings, or indoor floors. The quarry leaves only traces, such as scuff marks. If the character fails a Survival check, he can retry after 1 hour (outdoors) or 10 minutes (indoors) of searching. Normal: A character without this feat can use the Survival skill to find tracks, but can only follow tracks if the DC is 10 or less. A character can use the Search skill to find individual footprints, but cannot follow tracks using Search.

Trustworthy You have that winning smile. Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Diplomacy checks and Gather Information checks.

Two-Weapon Fighting You know how to use both fists in a fight. Prerequisite: Dexterity 13. Benefit: The character’s penalties for fighting with two weapons are lessened by 2 for the primary hand and 6 for the off hand. The weapons used must either be both melee weapons or ranged weapons (the character cannot mix the types).

Unbalance Opponent

You know how to enrage your opponent and make him swing wildly at you losing his momentum. Prerequisites: Defensive Martial Arts, base attack bonus +6. Benefit: During the character’s action, the character designates an opponent no more than one size category larger or smaller than the character. That opponent does not get to add his Strength modifier to attack rolls when targeting the character. (If the opponent has a Strength penalty, he still takes that penalty.) The opponent’s Strength modifier applies to damage, as usual. The character can select a new opponent on any action.

Vehicle Dodge

You know how to swerve to avoid dangers while behind the wheel. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Drive 6 ranks, Surface Vehicle Operation, Vehicle Expert. Benefit: When driving a vehicle, during the character’s action the character designates an opposing vehicle or a single opponent. The character’s vehicle and everyone aboard it receive a +1 dodge bonus to Defense against attacks from that vehicle or opponent. The character can select a new vehicle or opponent on any action.

Vehicle Expert You are a manic behind the wheel of a fusion-powered vehicle. Prerequisites: Surface Vehicle Operation Benefit: The character gets a +2 bonus on all Drive checks and Pilot checks.

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128 Feats Weapon Finesse Choose one light melee weapon, a rapier (if the character can use it with one hand), or a chain. A character can choose unarmed strike or grapple as a weapon for the purposes of this feat. Prerequisites: Proficient with weapon, base attack bonus +1. Benefit: With the selected melee weapon, the character may use his Dexterity modifier instead of his Strength modifier on attack rolls. Special: A character can gain this feat multiple times. Each time the character takes the feat, the character selects a different weapon.

Weapon Focus

You have spent extra time mastering a single weapon and are more proficient in it. Choose a specific weapon. A character can choose unarmed strike or grapple for your weapon for purposes of this feat. Prerequisites: Proficient with weapon, base attack bonus +1. Benefit: The character gains a +1 bonus on all attack rolls he makes using the selected weapon. Special: A character can gain this feat multiple times. Each time the character takes the feat, the character must select a different weapon.

Whirlwind Attack You have mastered the all-around attack with your melee attack that sends bodies flying in all directions. Prerequisites: Dexterity 13, Intelligence 13, Dodge, Mobility, Spring Attack, Combat Expertise, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: When the character performs a full-round action, the character can give up his regular attacks and instead make one melee attack at the character’s highest base attack bonus against each adjacent opponent.

Windfall You have been gifted with money, either through favors, inheritance, or luck. Benefit: The character gains 100 coins per character level when this Feat is taken. Special: The Feat may be taken an unlimited amount of times.

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IV

Equipment War never changes… Violence in the Wasteland is a part of life, and if you do not have the proper equipment you may be taking a dirt nap. As a character travels through the Wasteland he will need the right equipment. The Rad-Tek Survival Guide lists the optimal weapons, survival equipment, medical supplies, and other items considered essential to survive the aftermath of an atomic war; but, in the Wasteland a survivor has to learn to scrounge and to make the best use out of what can be found hidden in a ruined building or bunker; taken off the body of a hostile traveler: or, stolen from the inattentive and unwary. This chapter details the weapons, armor, and miscellaneous equipment that can be found in the Wasteland.

Equipment Basics Here lie the basics of the handling of equipment and weapons.

Concealed Weapons and Objects It is assumed that, when attempting to conceal a weapon or other object, a character is wearing appropriate clothing. Drawing a concealed weapon is more difficult than drawing a regularly holstered weapon, and normally requires an attack action. Keeping the weapon in an easier-to-draw position makes concealing it more difficult.

Sleight of Hand Checks To conceal a weapon or other object, make a Sleight of Hand check. A character concealing an object before he heads out into public can usually take 10 unless he is rushed, trying to conceal it when others might see, or under other unusual constraints. Sleight of Hand can be used untrained in this instance, but the character must take 10.

Size and Concealment

The object’s size affects the check result, as shown on the Concealing Weapons and Objects table. The type of holster used or clothing worn, and any attempt to make a weapon easier to draw, can also affect the check.

Spotting Concealed Objects

Concealing Weapons and Objects Condition Size of weapon or object Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge or larger Clothing is tight or small Clothing is especially loose or bulky Clothing is specifically modified for concealing object Weapon is carried in concealed carry holster Weapon can be drawn normally Weapon can be drawn as free action with Quick Draw feat

Noticing a concealed weapon or other object requires a Spot check. The DC varies: If the target made a roll when concealing an object, the DC of the Spot check to notice the object is the same as the target’s check result (an opposed check, in other words). If the target took 10 on his Sleight of Hand check, use this formula: Spot DC = Target’s Sleight of Hand skill modifier (including modifiers from the Concealing Weapons and Objects table above) + 10.

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Sleight of Hand Modifier +12 +8 +4 +0 –4 –8 can’t conceal –4 +2 +2 +4 –2 –4

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130 Equipment - Basics An observer attempting to spot a concealed object receives a –1 penalty for every 10 feet between himself and the target, and a –5 penalty if distracted. Patting someone down for a hidden weapon requires a similar check. The skill employed in Search, however, and the searcher gets a +4 circ*mstance bonus for the hands-on act of frisking the target. Some devices may also offer bonuses under certain circ*mstances (a metal detector offers a bonus to Search checks to find metal objects, for example).

Spotting Concealable Armor Concealable armor can be worn under clothing if the wearer wants it to go unnoticed. Do not use the modifiers from the Concealing Weapons and Objects table when wearing concealable armor. Instead, anyone attempting to notice the armor must make a Spot check (DC 30).

Carrying Capacity A character’s carrying capacity depends directly on the character’s Strength score, as Carrying Capacity table. Carrying Capacity If the weight of everything a character is Strength Light Load Medium Load wearing or carrying amounts to no more 1 up to 3 lb. 4–6 lb. than his light load figure, the character 2 up to 6 lb. 7–13 lb. can move and perform any action 3 up to 10 lb. 11–20 lb. 4 up to 13 lb. 14–26 lb. normally (though the character’s speed 5 up to 16 lb. 17–33 lb. might already be slowed by the armor he is 6 up to 20 lb. 21–40 lb. wearing). If the weight of a character’s gear falls in his medium load range, the character is considered encumbered. An encumbered character’s speed is reduced to the value given below, if the character is not already slowed to that speed for some other reason. Medium Encumbrance Speed Previous Speed Current Speed 20 ft. 15 ft. 30 ft. 20 ft. 40 ft. 30 ft. 50 ft. 40 ft. 60 ft. 50 ft.

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 +10

up to 23 lb. up to 26 lb. up to 30 lb. up to 33 lb. up to 38 lb. up to 43 lb. up to 50 lb. up to 58 lb. up to 66 lb. up to 76 lb. up to 86 lb. up to 100 lb. up to 116 lb. up to 133 lb. up to 153 lb. up to 173 lb. up to 200 lb. up to 233 lb. up to 266 lb. up to 306 lb. up to 346 lb. up to 400 lb. up to 466 lb. x4

24–46 lb. 27–53 lb. 31–60 lb. 34–66 lb. 39–76 lb. 44–86 lb. 51–100 lb. 59–116 lb. 67–133 lb. 77–153 lb. 87–173 lb. 101–200 lb. 117–233 lb. 134–266 lb. 154–306 lb. 174–346 lb. 201–400 lb. 234–466 lb. 267–533 lb. 307–613 lb. 347–693 lb. 401–800 lb. 467–933 lb. x4

shown on the Heavy Load 7–10 lb. 14–20 lb. 21–30 lb. 27–40 lb. 34–50 lb. 41–60 lb. 47–70 lb. 54–80 lb. 61–90 lb. 67–100 lb. 77–115 lb. 87–130 lb. 101–150 lb. 117–175 lb. 134–200 lb. 154–230 lb. 174–260 lb. 201–300 lb. 234–350 lb. 267–400 lb. 307–460 lb. 347–520 lb. 401–600 lb. 467–700 lb. 534–800 lb. 614–920 lb. 694–1,040 lb. 801–1,200 lb. 934–1,400 lb. x4

An encumbered character performs as if his Dexterity modifier were no higher than +3. In addition, the character takes a –3 encumbrance penalty on attack rolls and checks involving the following skills: Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, and Tumble. This encumbrance penalty stacks with any armor penalty that may also apply. If the weight of a character’s gear falls in his heavy load range, the character is considered heavily encumbered. A heavily encumbered character’s speed is reduced to the value given below, if the character is not already slowed to that speed for some other reason.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Heavy Encumbrance Speed Previous Speed Current Speed 20 ft. 10 ft. 30 ft. 15 ft. 40 ft. 20 ft. 50 ft. 25 ft. 60 ft. 30 ft.

A heavily encumbered character performs as if his or her Dexterity modifier were no higher than +1. In addition, the character takes a –6 encumbrance penalty on attack rolls and checks involving the following skills: Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, and Tumble. This encumbrance penalty stacks with any armor penalty that may also apply. Finally, a heavily encumbered character’s maximum running speed is his speed x3 instead of speed x4.

The figure at the upper end of a character’s heavy load range is his maximum load. No character can move or perform any other action while carrying more than his maximum load.

Lifting and Dragging A character can lift up to his maximum load over his head. A character can lift up to double his maximum load off the ground, but he can only stagger around with it. While overloaded in this way, the character loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense and can only move 5 feet per round (as a full-round action). A character can generally push or drag along the ground up to five times his maximum load. Favorable conditions (smooth ground, dragging a slick object) can double these numbers, and bad circ*mstances (broken ground, pushing an object that snags) can reduce them to one-half or less.

Bigger and Smaller Creatures

The figures on the Carrying Capacity table are for Medium-size bipedal creatures. Larger bipedal creatures can carry more weight depending on their size category: Large x2, Huge x4, Gargantuan x8, and Colossal x16. Smaller creatures can carry less weight depending on their size category: Small x3/4, Tiny x1/2, Diminutive x1/4, and Fine x1/8. Quadrupeds, such as horses, can carry heavier loads than can characters. Use these multipliers instead of the ones given above: Fine x1/4, Diminutive x1/2, Tiny x3/4, Small x1, Medium-size x1.5, Large x3, Huge x6, Gargantuan x12, and Colossal x24.

Tremendous Strength

For Strength scores not listed, find the Strength score between 20 and 29 that has the same ones digit as the creature’s Strength score. Multiply the figures by 4 if the creature’s Strength is in the 30s, 16 if it is in the 40s, 64 if it is in the 50s, and so on.

Post-Apocalyptic Economics The Wasteland operates on a barter economy: Each party in a transaction trades an item or items of equal value. Even so, memories of the past drive the inhabitants of the Waste to seek a symbolic link to the past in the form of a currency consisting of a rare but recognizable icon, the coin. This item is the basis for calculations of value and cost in the Wasteland. Collecting coins allows a survivor to carry large amounts of trading value without the weight of real items. One problem with basing a currency on artifacts of the past is that they wear out from use or are lost, reducing the ready supply of “cash” available for circulation. Oddly enough, no one worries about this in the course of surviving day to day. Eventually as pockets of civilization recovered a more sophisticated economic model evolved, as would be expected.

Currency of the Wasteland After the Exodus of 2012, the currency of paper bills and plastic cards became forgotten icons. Coins that survived the fallout replaced the old currency. This new currency, the coin is valued by the color or type of the coin and not the coin size.

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Currency Coin, Copper Coin, Gold Coin, Silver Coin, Steel

Coin Value 1 : 100 100 : 1 10 : 1 1:1

Scarcity C VR R C

Weight 1 lb./50 1 lb./10 1 lb./10 1 lb./40

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132 Equipment - Basics Copper coins basically are pennies. A steel coin includes nickels, dimes, quarters, half-dollars, and dollar coins. Collectable coins are generally made of gold and silver are a largely rarer than cooper or steel coins. The Currency table shows the coin value (compared to the steel coin), scarcity, and weight. Exodus defaults the term “coin or coins” always as the steel coin as these are the most common found. Other coins denote the type before coin, such as “copper coin.”

Wealth and Equipment All characters start with some wealth (in the form of steel coins) at first level to purchase equipment. Starting currency is listed under Occupations in Chapter 1. Beginning characters may only purchase equipment of Common or Uncommon Scarcity.

Scarcity Equipment, like all resources in the Wasteland, is scarce and treasured. New weapons and such items are rare; most are very old and may or may not have been well maintained since the fall of civilization. Scarcity is the name of the game, and characters traveling the Wastes should always be counting their bullets and wondering if they can get any more. Note: Scarcity, in Exodus, is also a rating of how hard it is to find a given item. It is abbreviated SCRC and listed with other item specifications. Common (C): This item can be found in most villages or settlements and is usually produced locally or can be crafted easily. These items require low levels of manufacturing technology, such as hand tools. Wasteland merchants will always have these types of items for sale. Uncommon (UN): This item can be found in trading posts or communities that have maintained or rediscovered some basic manufacturing capabilities. Wasteland merchants have a 50% chance that they will have an uncommon item for sale. Infrequent (I): This item is hard to find and difficult to manufacture. Usually kept close and guarded, if an item in this class is for sale it will be expensive. This class of items can also be found in old equipment caches from before the war. Wasteland merchants have a 25% chance that they will have an infrequent item for sale. Rare (R): This item requires advanced manufacturing and technical capability equal to or better than the pre-war era. This class of items can also be found in old equipment caches that date to before the war and if offered for trade will be very expensive. Wasteland merchants have a 10% chance that they will have rare item for sale. Very Rare (VR): This item is similar to a rare item in Description, except that only a few of these items survived the war or are manufactured as experimental projects by organizations with technical capability. This class of items is highly protected and can also be found in old equipment caches that date to before the war and if offered for trade will be very expensive. Wasteland merchants have a 5% chance that they will have a very rare item for sale. Unique (UQ): This item is one-of-a-kind and cannot be manufactured with any technology available. Items in this class include alien technology. Wasteland merchants will never have a Unique item for sale, these are found in Special Encounters set up by the Overseer.

Weapons Weapons are abundant in the Wastelands. Before the Exodus, guns and combat melee weapons were manufactured on a massive level for the military and for US citizens (for the right to bear arms). Now weapons of all type are sold from Wasteland merchants, pilfered from corpses, or found in the lost ruins of civilization.

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Whether you are killing things with a sharpened wooden stick or with a laser pistol, you need to know about implements of destruction if you want to be able to defend yourself in the Wasteland (where the best defense is often of a preemptive and anticipatory nature). The weapons covered here are grouped into three categories based on their general utility: ranged weapons, explosives and splash weapons, and melee weapons.

Ranged Weapons Ranged weapons fall into three general groups: handguns, longarms, and other ranged weapons such as crossbows. When using a ranged weapon, the wielder applies his Dexterity modifier to the attack roll. Handguns and longarms are personal firearms. A personal firearm is any firearm designed to be carried and used by a single person.

Ranged Weapons Table

Ranged weapons are described by a number of statistics, as shown on the Ranged Weapons charts.

Damage: The damage the weapon deals on a successful hit. Critical: The threat range for a critical hit. If the threat is confirmed, a weapon deals double damage on a critical hit (roll damage twice, as if hitting the target two times).

Damage Type: Ranged weapon damage is classified according to type: physical (all firearms), energy, explosion, or laser/plasma. Some creatures or characters may be resistant or immune to some forms of damage.

Range Increment: Any attack at less than this distance is not penalized for range. Each full range

increment causes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll, however. Ranged weapons have a maximum range of ten range increments, except for thrown weapons, which have a maximum range of five range increments.

Rate of Fire: Some ranged weapons have a rate of fire of 1, which simply means they can be employed once per round and then must be reloaded or replaced. Firearms, which operate through many different forms of internal mechanisms, have varying rates of fire. The three possible rates of fire for handguns, longarms, and heavy weapons are: single shot, semiautomatic, and automatic. Single Shot: A weapon with the single shot rate of fire requires the user to manually operate the action (the mechanism that feeds and co*cks the weapon) between each shot. Pump-action shotguns and bolt-action rifles are examples of firearms with single shot rates of fire. A weapon with the single shot rate of fire can fire only one shot per attack, even if the user has a feat or other ability that normally allows more than one shot per attack. Semiautomatic (S): Most firearms have the semiautomatic rate of fire. These firearms feed and co*ck themselves with each shot. A semiautomatic weapon fires one shot per attack (effectively acting as a single shot weapon), but some feats allow characters armed with semiautomatic weapons to fire shots in rapid successions, getting in more than one shot per attack. Automatic (A): Automatic weapons fire a burst or stream of shots with a single squeeze of the trigger. Only weapons with the automatic rate of fire can be set on auto-fire or be used with feats that take advantage of automatic fire. Select Fire (SF): This weapon can fire either semiautomatic or automatic fire Double Action (DA): Each time the trigger is pulled the revolver fires a round and rotates the cylinder to place the next round into position to fire.

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134 Equipment - Weapons Single Action (SA): Each time the weapon is fired the shooter must pull back the hammer to rotate the cylinder and move the next round into position before it will fire again. Side by Side (SxS): A firearm with two barrels set side by side, usually a shotgun, but this configuration was also common with very heavy caliber rifles used to hunt big game in Africa in the late 19 th and early 20th century. Over and Under (O/U): A firearm with two barrels set one on top of the other, usually a shotgun or combination gun (such as a shotgun with grenade launcher or an assault rifle with a flame thrower).

Magazine The weapon’s magazine capacity and type are given in this column. The amount of ammunition a weapon carries, and hence how many shots it can fire before needing to be reloaded, is determined by its magazine capacity. How the firearm is reloaded depends upon its magazine type. The number in this entry is the magazine’s capacity in shots; the word that follows the number indicates the magazine type: box, cylinder, or internal. A fourth type, linked, has an unlimited capacity; for this reason the entry does not also have a number. Weapons with a dash in this column have no magazines; they are generally thrown weapons, or weapons (such as bows) that are loaded as part of the firing process. Box (B): A box magazine is any type of magazine that can be removed and reloaded separately from the weapon. Internal magazine: This indicates that the ammunition is stored in the chamber(s) or in an internal Box and must be replaced manually. Clip (CL): This is a metal clip that is fastened to the end of a group of cartridges; it is inserted into the firearm and pops back out when the weapon runs out of cartridges. Clip/Internal (I/C): These weapons have an internal magazine that is loaded by a clip; these weapons can be reloaded when partially empty. Cylinder (CY): A revolver keeps its ammunition in a cylinder, which is part of the weapon and serves as the firing chamber for each round as well. Unlike box magazines, cylinders cannot be removed, and they must be reloaded by hand. Most revolvers can be used with a speed loader. Using a speed loader is much like inserting a box magazine into a weapon. Without a speed loader, a firearm with a cylinder magazine must be loaded by hand. Drum (D): This is a circular drum that holds ammunition, usually for automatic weapons. External Box (EB): These are linked cartridges packaged in an external magazine for light machineguns. Internal (IN): Some weapons keep their ammunition in an internal space, which must be loaded by hand. This is the case with most shotguns, as well as some rifles. Linked (L): Some machine guns use linked ammunition. The bullets are chained together with small metal clips, forming a belt. Typically, a belt holds 50 bullets; any number of belts can be clipped together. In military units, as the gunner fires, an assistant clips new ammunition belts together, keeping the weapon fed. Fusion Cell (F): These energy cells are universal for energy and plasma based weapons and fusion propelled vehicles and hold a maximum charge of 50 fusion units. Tank (TK): These are for flamethrower fuel, oxygen or similar combustible substance. Tube (T): Ammunition is stored in a tube that runs under the barrel of the weapon, this is used in manual operation weapons like level or pump action firearms.

Size: Size categories for weapons and other objects are defined differently from the size categories for creatures. The relationship between a weapon’s size and that of its wielder defines whether it can be used one-handed, if it

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requires two hands, and if it is a light weapon. A Medium-size or smaller weapon can be used one-handed or two-handed. A Large weapon requires two hands. A Huge weapon requires two hands and a bipod or other mount. A Small or smaller weapon is considered a light weapon. It can be used one-handed and, as a light weapon, is easier to use in your off hand.

Weight: This column gives the weapon’s weight when fully loaded. Cost: This is the base price of a weapon and does not include any modifier for bartering. Scarcity: This is the scarcity rating for the weapon.

Reloading Firearms Reloading a firearm with an already filled box magazine, clip, drum or speed loader is a move action. Refilling a box magazine or a speed loader, or reloading a revolver without a speed loader or any weapon with a fusion cell, internal magazine, tank, or tube, is a full-round action. Loading a belt of linked ammunition is a full-round action. Linking two belts together is a move action.

Abbreviations and Terms

DMG: Dice of damage inflicted by the weapon. RNG: Range increment in feet. REF: Reflex save DC for half damage. ROF: Rate of fire. MAG: Magazine capacity, the number of cartridges a firearm can fire before it needs to be reloaded. SIZE: Weapon size (tiny, small, medium, large, huge). WT: Weapon weight (loaded). STR: Minimum Strength required handling the weapon properly (–1 to attack rolls for each point below the minimum STR). TYPE: Damage type (physical (P), energy (E), laser (L), explosive (X)). PROF: Proficiency feat required. SCRC: Scarcity. COST: Price in trade coins. CRIT: Threat range (if no CRIT is listed, the Threat Range is 20). RADIUS: Explosive damage radius in feet. ROF: S: Semiautomatic and Double Action weapons fire once per attack but some circ*mstances, like advanced character level or feats, allow more than one shot per melee round. ROF: A: Automatic: Automatic weapons fire a burst or stream of bullets at an intended target with only one pull of the trigger. These weapons allow Burst firing if the shooter has the Burst feat. ROF: Single: These weapons often only hold one round of ammunition and can only fire once per melee round despite any advanced level or feats.

Ammunition Ammunition in Exodus d20 works on the general damage dice type based on the caliber, gauge, or millimeter of the ammunition, albeit this is just a guideline for firearms that are not included in this guidebook. Some of the ammunition has been generalized from variety type in this chart to make play easier (such as 7.62x39 or 7.62x54R is treated as the

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Knockdown (Optional Rule)

Several bullet types or guns with advance firing power are powerful enough to knockdown an opponent upon a successful hit. Firearms that have a base damage die of a d10 or d12 has the potential to blow the man down. Opponents hit with type of bullet needs to make a Balance skill check equal to the damage dealt (minus DR) or be knocked down to the ground. Success means that the opponent takes a couple of staggering steps but remains standing.

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136 Equipment - Weapons NATO 7.62 round even though we know that they are not compatible—but the bullet does do the same damage). Some firearms treat ammunition a little differently than what is listed on the ammunition chart (for instance, high powered rifles may deal +1 additional die of damage; with cases such as this, it is up to the Overseer to determine the exact dice of damage).

Fusion Cell The fusion cell was created to combat the rising cost of oilbased fuels at the turn of the 21st century by Mr. Fusion International. Fusion cells were originally created for the military to power energy weapons, but later were adapted to power armor and fusion-powered vehicles. A fusion cell is a small nuclear reactor that utilizes plasma and hydrogen to power the cell. The cell holds a 50 unit charge before the cell is expended and become useless. A cell cannot be recharged.

Ammunition Types of ammo

Gun Type

Damage

WT

SCRC

.22 .223 .357 .38 or .380 .44 .45 .50 2mm EC 5.7mm 9mm 10mm 14mm .30-06 .30-30 .444 4.7mm caseless 5mm 5.56mm 6.5mm 7.62mm 8mm .10 (gauge shot) .12 (gauge shot) .20 (gauge shot) .12 slug .20 slug Fusion Cell Fuel Tank Rockwell Rocket Arbalest Bolt Crossbow Bolt Arrow

Handgun Handgun Handgun Handgun Handgun Handgun Handgun/Rifle Handgun/Rifle Submachine Handgun Handgun Handgun Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Rifle Shotgun Shotgun Shotgun Shotgun Shotgun Energy Firearm Flamethrower Rocket Launcher Archaic Bow Archaic Bow Archaic Bow

2d4 2d8 2d6 2d6 2d8 2d6 2d12 5d6 2d8 2d6 2d6 2d8 2d10 2d8 2d10 3d8 2d6 2d8 2d8 2d10 2d4 2d10 2d8 2d6 2d8 2d6 Varies 3d6 10d6 3d6 1d10 1d8

1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./20 1lb./30 1lb./20 1lb./20 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./20 1lb./20 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./20 1lb./20 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./20 1lb./20 1lb. 5lb. 2lb. 1lb. 1lb./12 1lb./20

C R UN UN UN I I R VR C UN R I I R R I I I I I R UN I I I I I I R I I

Cost per round 1 4 6 3 3 8 15 8 12 5 4 15 8 7 11 12 3 6 7 8 8 17 11 8 10 7 20 25 200 2 1 2

Special Ammunition In some cases when exploring, or on rare occasion, a special type of ammunition can be found.

Hollow Point (JHP): A hollow point bullet is designed to fragment upon impact creating a larger area of damage on a target. This type of bullet causes an additional 1d6 points of damage and on confirmed critical hits causes x3 damage modifier. Armor Piercing (AP): Armor piercing bullets are designed with a sharp tip to penetrate armor. This type of bullet ignores PDR/5 and deals -2 points of damage (minimum 0). Special Ammunition Bullet Armor Piercing Hollow Point Armor Piercing Hollow Point Armor Piercing Hollow Point Armor Piercing Hollow Point Hollow Point

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Ammunition .44 .44 5mm 5mm 9mm 9mm 10mm 10mm 14mm

Damage ignores PDR/5 +1d6 damage ignores PDR/5 +1d6 damage ignores PDR/5 +1d6 damage ignores PDR/5 +1d6 damage ignores PDR/5

Crit x3 x3 x3 x3 x3

WT 1lb./20 1lb./20 1lb./30 1lb./30 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./40 1lb./20

SCRC R R R R I I I I VR

Cost per round 12 9 15 12 12 10 12 10 30

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Handguns A handgun is a personal firearm that can be used one-handed without penalty. This includes all pistols and some submachine guns and shotguns. All handguns require the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat. Using a handgun without this feat imposes a –4 penalty on attack rolls. Handguns can be broken down into three smaller groups: autoloaders, revolvers, and machine pistols. Autoloaders (sometimes called “automatics”) feature removable box magazines, and some models hold quite a lot of ammunition. They work by using the energy of a shot fired to throw back a slide, eject the shot’s shell casing, and scoop the next round into the chamber. They are more complex than revolvers, but nevertheless have become increasingly popular in the modern age. Revolvers are relatively simple firearms that store several rounds (usually six) in a revolving cylinder. As the trigger is pulled, the cylinder revolves to bring the next bullet in line with the barrel. Machine pistols are automatic weapons small enough to be fired with one hand. Some are autoloader pistols modified to fire a burst of bullets in a single pull of the trigger, while others are modified submachine guns, cut down in size and weight to allow one-handed use. Ranged weapons that use box magazines come with one full magazine.

Handguns .223 Custom .22 Hideout 2 Beretta 92F (9mm) Beretta 93R (9mm) Colt 6520 (10mm) Colt M1911 (.45) Derringer (.22) 2 Derringer (.38) 2 Derringer (.45) 2 Desert Eagle (.38) Desert Eagle (.44) Desert Eagle (.50) Glock 17 (9mm) 1 Glock 20 (10mm) 1 MAB P15 (9mm) Mauser M96 (9mm) Revolver DA (.22) Revolver DA (.38) Revolver DA (.357) Revolver DA (.44) Revolver SA (.22) Revolver SA (.45) Ruger Mk II (.22) Sig-Sauer (14mm) SITES M9 (9mm) 2 Skorpion (.32) TEC-9 (9mm) Trade Pistol (.38) Walther PPK (.32) 2 Walther PPK (.380) 2

DMG 2d8 2d4 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d4 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d8 2d12 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d4 2d6 2d6 2d8 2d4 2d6 2d4 3d8 2d6 2d4 2d6 2d6 2d4 2d6

CRIT x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2 x2

RNG 50 20 40 30 40 30 10 10 10 40 40 40 30 40 40 40 30 30 40 40 30 40 40 30 30 40 40 30 30 20

ROF S S S S,A S S Single Single Single S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S, A S or A Single S S

MAG 5B 5B 15 B 20 B 12 B 7B 2I 2I 2I 8B 8B 8B 17 B 15 B 15 B 10 B 6 CY 6 CY 6 CY 6 CY 6 CY 6 CY 10 B 6B 8B 20 B 32 B 1I 7B 7B

SIZE Med Tiny Small Med Small Small Tiny Tiny TINY Med Med Med Small Small Small Med Small Small Med Med Small Med Med Med Tiny Med Med Small Small Tiny

WT 5 1 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 1 2 3 3 1 3 3 5 2 4 4 2 1 2

STR 13 10 10 11 11 8 10 12 12 14 10 11 10 10 8 11 12 11 14 8 8 10 8 6 6

SCRC VR I I R UN I I I R I I VR R R C UN UN UN UN UN UN UN I R R UN UN UN I I

COST 3500 100 700 900 250 410 60 90 120 800 800 4500 1700 2200 225 1500 100 200 425 600 100 385 400 1100 480 800 1100 110 125 150

1 Due to the quality of this weapon, shooters gains a +1 circ*mstance (accuracy) bonus to hit. 2 This weapon is easily concealed and it treated as one size smaller when hidden.

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138 Equipment - Weapons .223 Custom Pistol This handgun is a homemade conversion of a .223 semiautomatic rifle into a pistol, the work shows a great deal of love and skill.

.22 Hideout This is a very small .22 semiautomatic pistol that is easily concealed.

Beretta 92F This was the standard service pistol of the United States military and many American law enforcement agencies.

Beretta 93R

This close relative of the Beretta 92F looks like a large autoloader but can fire on automatic. It sports a fold-down grip in front of the trigger guard, an extendable steel shoulder stock that is attached to the butt of the pistol, and an extended magazine. This weapon features a threeround burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

Colt 6520 Based on the M1911 mechanism, this semiautomatic 10mm pistol was the Rent-a-Cop industry standard issue sidearm that fires a 10mm round.

Colt M1911

This .45 semiautomatic pistol was used by the United States military for decades until it was replaced by the Beretta 92F.

Derringer

This pistol breaks open at the breech like a double-barreled shotgun. The two-shot weapon has one barrel atop the other and is barely 5 inches long, making it easy to conceal. The Derringer is made in .22, .38, and .45 models.

Desert Eagle Manufactured by Israeli Military Industries, the Desert Eagle is the king of large-frame, heavycaliber autoloaders. The Desert Eagle fires the massive .50 AE round and also comes in .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum models. This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

Glock 17 The Glock is typical of the 9mm self-loading pistol that was carried by many police officers and military personnel in the 21st century. Due to its high quality manufacturing, the Glock 17 grants a +1 circ*mstance bonus on attack rolls.

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Glock 20

This slightly larger version of the Glock 17 is chambered for the slightly more powerful 10mm round. Due to its high quality manufacturing, the Glock 20 grants a +1 circ*mstance bonus on attack rolls.

MAB P15

This is a very reliable 9mm semiautomatic pistol once used by both the American and French military forces.

Mauser M96

The famous “Broom Handle” Mauser 9mm semiautomatic pistol, developed in the late 19 th century and used in the first two World Wars.

Revolvers DA

These double action revolvers were manufactured for a variety of calibers by a wide variety of manufacturers.

Revolvers SA

These single action revolvers, known as the sidearm of the 19 th American cowboy, are found in .22 and .45 and were manufactured by Colt or Ruger.

Ruger Mk II

This is a .22 semiautomatic target pistol made with such skill that all examples are of great craftsmanship. This model was popular with covert agents and assassins due to its accuracy and very low noise when used with a suppressor.

Sig-Sauer 14mm This is a large semiautomatic pistol developed as an answer to the advancing level of body armor technology in the early-mid 21st century.

SITES M9 Resolver

The compact SITES weapon is very narrow, making it easy to conceal.

Skorpion The CZ61 Skorpion is a Czech machine pistol seen increasingly in the West since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Originally intended for military vehicle crews who do not have space for an unwieldy longarm, it was widely distributed to Communist countries and in central Africa, and can now be found anywhere in the world.

TEC-9 The Intratec TEC-9 is an inexpensive machine pistol popular with criminals because it can be modified (Repair check DC 15) to fire on automatic. The pistol only works on semiautomatic fire or, if modified, only on automatic. Once modified to fire on automatic, the TEC-9 cannot be changed back to semiautomatic.

Trade Pistol

This is a reliable single shot break action .38 pistol developed by post apocalyptic gunsmiths based on designs from the 19th century.

Walther PPK

The PPK is a small, simple, and reliable autoloader with a design that dates back to the 1930s. The Walther PPK is made in both a .32 and .380 models.

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Longarms Longarms are personal firearms that require two hands to be fired without penalty. This group includes hunting and sniping rifles, assault rifles, shotguns, and most submachine guns. The basic longarm is the rifle, a group that includes both hunting rifles and sniper rifles. Most rifles are autoloaders, and they function internally in a manner very similar to autoloader pistols. Some models are operated manually, however, with the user having to work a bolt or lever between each shot. Assault rifles are rifles designed for military use and feature automatic as well as semiautomatic fire. Shotguns are large-bore weapons that primarily fire shells full of small projectiles. They tend to be powerful, but only at short range. Reduce shotgun damage by 1 point for every range increment of the attack. Submachine guns are relatively compact longarms that generally fire pistol ammunition. They can fire on automatic. All longarms are covered by the Personal Firearms Proficiency feat. Longarms are not well suited to close combat. A character takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll when firing at an adjacent target.

Submachine Guns Colt 635 (9mm) H&K MP5 (9mm) 1 H&K MP5K (9mm) H&K MP9 (10mm) H&K P90 (5.7mm) M3A1 (.45) M3A1 (9mm) MAC Ingram 10 (.45) MAC Ingram 10 (9mm) MAC Ingram 11 (.380) Thompson M1928 (.45) Uzi (9mm)

DMG 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d8 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6 2d6

CRIT 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

RNG 60 50 50 50 70 50 50 40 40 30 60 40

ROF S, A S, A S,A S, A S, A S, A S, A S, A S, A S, A S, A S, A

MAG 32 B 30 B 30 B 30 B 50 B 30 B 30 B 30 B 30 B 30 B 50 D 20 B

SIZE Large Large Med Large Large Large Large Med Med Med Large Large

WT 6 6 4 6 6 7 7 6 6 4 9 8

STR 10 10 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 12 10

SCRC C UN I I VR I I I UN I I I

COST 950 1400 2100 1000 5000 1750 1750 975 910 800 1200 1000

1 Due to the quality of this weapon, shooters gains a +1 circ*mstance (accuracy) bonus to hit.

Colt 635: This 9mm select fire weapon appears to be a small M16; it was designed to be easy to use by troops who already knew how to operate the M16. An optional 20 round box magazine is available.

H&K MP5:

The Heckler & Koch MP5 family of weapons is among the most recognizable in the world. This is a very popular 9mm select fire weapon used worldwide by many military organizations. An optional 15 round box magazine is available. Due to its high quality manufacturing, the MP5 grants a +1 circ*mstance bonus on attack rolls. This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

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HK MP5K

A radically shortened version of the MP5, this weapon is optimized to be concealable. The steps taken to reduce the weapon’s size and weight negate the benefits of the parent weapon’s extraordinary quality. Although it comes with a 15-round magazine, the MP5K can also accept the same 30-round magazine as the MP5 (use of the larger magazine increases the weapon’s size to Large, though). This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

H&K MP9: Many of these SMGs are well-known select fire 10mm weapons stored in Fallout Shelter armories.

H&K P90: This is an innovative select fire weapon intended for use by police and troops in vehicles, it features a bullpup design that allows a somewhat longer barrel than other SMGs and a 50 round magazine and uses the 5.7mm cartridge.

M3A1:

This SMG is the venerable “Grease Gun” designed late during World War 2. It is a select fire weapon produced in .45 and adaptable to 9mm with special parts and magazines. It was cheap to produce as it was mostly made from stamped metal pieces instead of the traditional machined metal and wood.

MAC Ingram M10/11 A short run in production produced about 10,000 of these small submachine guns made and supplied to United States police forces, the U.S. Army, Cuba, and Peru. Light pressure on the trigger produces single shots, while increased pressure brings automatic fire. This compact select fire weapon is available in 9mm and .45 (the MAC 10) or a smaller configuration firing a .380 cartridge (MAC 11) and can be fitted with a suppressor without modification.

Thompson M1928: The iconic “Tommy Gun” from the early 20 th century Gangster era and World War 2 is a .45 select fire weapon. This SMG supports optional 20 and 30 round box magazine ammunition.

Uzi Designed in the 1950s for the Israeli army, the Uzi has become the most popular submachine gun in the world. It features a collapsible stock, making it extremely compact.

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142 Equipment - Weapons Rifles AK 47 (7.62mm) AK-112 (5mm) Bolt Action Target Rifle (.22) Bushwhacker Heavy Sniper Rifle (.50) Bushwhacker Sniper Rifle (.223) CAR-15 (.223) Colt Rangemaster (.223) DKS 501 Sniper Rifle (.223) DKS 101 Sniper Rifle (7.62mm) FN FAL (7.62mm) H&K G11 (4.7mm caseless) H&K 53 (.223) Henry Survival Rifle (.22) Lever Action Carbine (.22) Lever Action Carbine (.30-30) M1 Carbine (.30 carbine) M1 Garand (.30-06) M14 (7.62) M16A1 (.223) M16A2 (.223) M1903 Bolt Action (.30-06) M4 Carbine (.223) Mauser Bolt Action (6.5mm) Mauser Bolt Action (8mm) Remington 700 (.30-06) Ruger 1022 (.22) SKS Carbine (7.62mm) Steyr AUG (5.56 mm) Winchester 94 (.30-30)

DMG 2d8 2d8 2d4

CRIT 20 20 20

RNG 60 80 60

ROF S, A S, A S

MAG 30 B 24 B 5B

SIZE LG LG LG

WT 10 7 5

STR 10 10 6

SCRC I I I

COST 1300 1300 655

2d12

20/x3

150

S

10 B

LG

35

14

VR

7600

2d8 2d8 2d8 2d8 2d10 2d10 3d8 2d10 2d4 2d4 2d8 2d8 2d10 2d10 2d8 2d8 2d10 2d8 2d8 2d12 2d10 2d4 2d10 2d8 2d8

20/x3 20 20 x3 x3 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20

120 60 80 100 110 80 80 60 60 60 70 60 100 90 80 80 100 60 90 100 100 60 80 80 100

S, A S, A S S S S, A S, A S, A S S S S S S S, A S, A S S, A S S S S S S,A S

30 B 30 B 10 B 6B 6B 20 B 50 30 8B 10 T 6T 15 B 8 CL 20 B 30 B 30 B 5 C/I 30 B 5 C/I 5 C/I 7 C/I 10 B 10 C/I 30 B 6I

LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG LG Med LG LG LG LG LG LG LG

20 5 11 10 12 10 7 8 3 4 6 5 12 10 7 7 9 5 9 9 8 5 8 9 8

10 10 10 10 12 12 10 10 6 6 10 10 12 12 10 10 12 10 10 12 12 6 10 10 8

R I C I I I VR I I UN UN UN I I I I I R I I I UN I R UN

5250 1500 1000 2200 2550 1500 6500 1350 850 750 1100 1200 1650 1500 1500 2100 1800 2800 1750 1825 1950 1000 1175 3400 800

AK-47

This assault rifle of the old Soviet Union is one of the most popular firearms in the world, having found common use in scores of bush wars and insurrections—on all sides of such conflicts. This select fire 7.62x39mm assault rifle became the standard weapon for over half the world as it was copied and sold to other Communist countries and unstable regions.

AK-112

This is an old 5mm military assault rifle used in the early to mid 21 st century but obsolete by the time of the Great War.

Bolt Action Target Rifle

This is a simple stock .22 bolt-action rifle, generally used for training in the firearm skill.

Bushwhacker Sniper Rifle

This select fire .223 rifle is an interesting refinement of the sniper's art. The Bushwhacker is somewhat finicky and is prone to jamming if not kept scrupulously clean, however, the big weapon's accuracy more than makes up for its extra maintenance requirements. This Bushwhacker also comes in a Heavy version firing .50 caliber rounds.

CAR-15 This .223 select fire assault carbine is the shorter version of the M16A1.

Colt Rangemaster

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This .223 semiautomatic hunting rifle was very popular before the fall of civilization.

DKS 501 Sniper Rifle

This is a semi-automatic .223 rifle designed for extreme accuracy and is equipped with a scope.

DKS 101 Sniper Rifle

This is a semi-automatic 7.62mm rifle designed for extreme accuracy and is equipped with a scope.

FN FAL

This 7.62mm assault rifle has been more widely used by armed forces than any other rifle in history. It is a reliable assault weapon for any terrain or tactical situation.

H&K G11

This gun revolutionized assault weapon design. The weapon fires a caseless 4.7mm cartridge consisting of a block of propellant with a bullet buried inside. The resultant weight and space savings allow this weapon to have a very high magazine capacity.

H&K 53 This is a compact .223 select fire assault carbine that was very popular with the military forces of many countries. An optional 40 round magazine is available.

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144 Equipment - Weapons Henry Survival Rifle This is a .22 semiautomatic carbine that can be broken down and the action and barrel stored in a watertight container inside the stock of the weapon.

HKG3 The G3 fires the powerful 7.62mm cartridge, a round used in many light machine guns but increasingly uncommon in assault rifles. At one time, over sixty of the world’s armies used this rifle.

HK PSG1 This high-precision sniper rifle, based on the design of the HK G3, has a fully adjustable trigger and stock for individual users. The PSG1 comes with a standard scope. Due to its high quality manufacturing, the PSG1 grants a +1 circ*mstance bonus on attack rolls.

Lever Action Carbine

This is the iconic American cowboy rifle, and was produced in .22 and .30-06 models.

M1 Carbine

This is a compact and lightweight military rifle that uses a specially designed .30 cartridge; it was used by vehicle drivers, officers, paratroopers, and others requiring a light and convenient weapon that was larger and more powerful than a handgun. An optional 30 round magazine is available.

M1 Garand This is the basic infantry rifle of the American military during the Second World War. It is accurate at long ranges and fires the powerful .30-06 cartridge.

M14 This is the replacement for the M1 Garand; this 7.62 semiautomatic heavy battle rifle was one of the last of its type to see production as a military rifle. It embodied the qualities of very long range, high penetration, and stopping power. Heavy and too long to use in close quarters or in a jungle, it was almost obsolete when it was new. After the M14, assault rifles were shorter, lighter, and used a smaller cartridge.

M16A1 This .223 select fire assault rifle was the standard American military rifle for many decades of the mid and late 20th century, and derivatives of the original design were in use for over 50 years.

M16A2

Typical of the assault rifles used by militaries around the world, the Colt M16A2 is the current service rifle of the United States military, and is common with other armies and in the civilian world.

This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

M1903 Springfield This is a .30-60 bolt-action rifle that was the standard American military rifle of the First World War. It is very well made and fires out to long ranges with high accuracy and stopping power.

M4 Carbine This is a cut-down version of the Colt M16A2, shortened by about a third by means of a telescoping stock and a shorter barrel.

Mauser Bolt Action Rifle This is a finely made bolt-action rifle from Germany and other countries. The Mauser rifle was the standard German military rifle for the two World Wars.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Remington 700

A bolt-action rifle with a reputation for accuracy, the Remington 700 has been popular with hunters and target shooters since its introduction in the 1940s.

SKS Carbine

This semiautomatic 7.62x39mm carbine was a standard military arm of Communist countries for many years.

Ruger 1022

This is a .22 semiautomatic carbine.

Steyr AUG An unusual and exotic-looking weapon, the bull-pup AUG is the standard rifle of the Austrian and Australian armies. It’s completely ambidextrous components make it equally convenient for left- and right-handed users, and it features a built-in optical sight. This weapon features a three-round burst setting. When used with the Burst Fire feat, it fires only three bullets instead of five and can be used with only three bullets in the weapon. This setting does not grant the ability to make burst fire attacks without the Burst Fire feat; if a character uses the setting without the feat, he makes a normal attack, and the extra two bullets are wasted.

Winchester 94

The Winchester Model 94 Big Bore is a lever-action rifle typical of big-bore hunting rifles found around the world.

Shotguns Benelli 121 M1 (12- gauge) Beretta M3P (12-gauge) Browning BPS (10-gauge) Double Barrel (SxS or O/U) (12gauge) Double Barrel (SxS or O/U) (20guage) H&K CAWS (12- gauge) Mossberg (12-gauge) Pancor Jackhammer (12-gauge) Pump Action Shotgun (12-gauge) Pump Action Shotgun (20-gauge) Sawed-Off (SxS or O/U) (12-gauge) Sawed-Off (SxS or O/U) (20-gauge) Winchester Combat Shotgun

DMG 2d8 2d8 2d10 2d8

CRIT 19-20 19-20 20/x3 19-20

RNG 40 30 30 30

ROF S S Single S

MAG 7I 5B 5I 2I

SIZE Large Large Large Large

WT 8 9 11 6

STR 10 12 10 10

SCRC UN I VR I

COST 1650 2250 7350 800

2d6

19-20

30

S

2I

Large

6

8

UN

600

2d8 2d8 2d8 2d8 2d6 2d8 2d6 2d8

19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20 19-20

40 30 40 30 30 10 10 40

S, A S S, A S S S S S, A

10 B 6I 10 B 5T 5T 2I 2I 12 B

Large Large Large Large Large Med. Med. Large

5 7 12 7 7 4 4 10

12 10 10 10 8 12 10 10

R I R I UN I I I

4750 1200 5500 1350 1125 800 600 2750

Benelli 121 M1 The Benelli 121 M1 semiautomatic shotgun is reliable, simple, and sturdy, with one of the fastest shotgun actions in the world. Many military and law enforcement agencies Shotguns – The following rules for shotguns replaces those listed in used this weapon. the Modern SRD.

Beretta M3P

Designed for police and rent-a-cop work, the M3P can fire either single shots or on semiautomatic. The M3P comes equipped with a tubular steel stock that folds over the top of the weapon to form a carrying handle, and its ammunition feeds from a box magazine — an uncommon feature in a shotgun.

When shooting at targets point-blank (within 10 feet) of an opponent, a shotgun blast deals +1 die to damage on a successful hit. The maximum range for a shotgun is 4 range increments. Damage is reduced per range increment past the first by –2 (to a maximum of –6 damage). The standard shotgun ammunition is buck-shot, however slugs (Scarcity: Rare) can be fired if found. 20 gauge Slug: 2d8 (20/x3); cost 18 12 gauge Slug: 2d10 (20/x3); cost 40 10 gauge Slug: 3d8 (20/x3); cost 65

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146 Equipment - Weapons Browning BPS This heavy longarm fires the largest shotgun round available, the 10-gauge shell.

Double Barrel Shotgun This is a hunting shotgun with two barrels set either side by side or one above the other (called “over and under”). This gun was manufactured to shoot either 12 or 20 gauge shells (which was popular with women and younger shooters who were not strong enough to use a 12 gauge shotgun).

H&K CAWS The CAWS, short for Close Assault Weapons System, assault shotgun is a useful tool for close-range combat. The bull-pup layout gives the weapon a short, easily handled, length while still retaining enough barrel length for its high velocity shells.

Mossberg

The Mossberg Model 500 ATP6C is a pump-action shotgun designed for military and police work.

Pancor Jackhammer

This is an advanced bull-pup .12 assault shotgun that is easy to control even when using full automatic fire.

Pump Shotgun

This is a 12 or 20-gauge shotgun that is manually co*cked by pumping a slide under the barrel. This model was often used by law enforcement.

Sawed-Off Shotgun

This is a 12 or 20-gauge, double-barreled shotgun with the stock and barrels sawed short. All that is left of the stock is a pistol grip, and the barrels are roughly 12 inches long. Sawed-off shotguns are mostly homemade by cutting down a standard shotgun, which also makes it easier to conceal. If this weapon if fully-loaded, a character can fire both barrels at once. The character receives a –2 penalty on the attack but deals +1 die of damage with a successful hit. Attacking this way uses both shotgun shells.

Winchester City-Killer

Also known as the Combat Shotgun, this is an advanced bull-pup 12-guage assault shotgun.

Combination Longarms Combination Firearms are generally crafted by gunsmiths, however on rare occasions, a merchant in the Wasteland gains possession of one of these nifty finds. Below are a few examples of combination guns that can be found in the Wasteland. A combination gun has a Scarcity rating of Very Rare, costs the combined values of both weapons minus 10%, and weighs 1.5 times of the heavier weapon.

Savage Arms

This unusual gun features two barrels in an over-and-under configuration. chambered for a shotgun round and the other barrel is chambered for a rifle round.

One barrel is

Assault Rifle/Flame Thrower

This unusual gun features an assault rifle with a flame thrower in an over-and-under configuration.

Combat Shotgun/Grenade Launcher

This unusual gun features two barrels in an over-and-under configuration. The top barrel is chambered for a shotgun round and the bottom barrel is chambered for a 40mm grenade rounds.

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Exotic Weapons Exotic weapons cover a variety of firearms and melee weapons that require the Exotic Firearm or Exotic Weapon perk to utilize properly in combat (see Exotic Firearm and Exotic Weapon perk listing in Chapter 3 for more details).

Heavy Weapons The heavy weapons covered in this section fall under the Exotic Firearms Proficiency perk. Someone who wields a heavy weapon without the appropriate Exotic Firearms Proficiency takes a –4 penalty on all attack rolls with the weapon.

Heavy Weapons 1 Flambé Thrower * M2HB M72A3 LAW 2 M79 2 M60 LMG 7.62 Minigun Minigun, Punisher Minigun, Vulcan Rockwell Launcher 2

DMG 3d6 2d12 Varies Varies 2d8 3d8 4d8 5d8 Varies

CRIT 20 20 20/x3 20/x3 20 20 20 20 20

TYPE E P X X P P P P X

RNG 10 110 150 70 100 70 80 80 150

ROF S A Single Single S, A A A A Single

MAG 10 TK 120 L 1I 1I 50 EB 120 D 120 D 120 D 1I

SIZE LG Huge Large Large Large Large Large Large Large

WT 18 75 5 7 23 31 28 28 15

STR 14 16 14 14 18 18 18 18 14

SCRC R VR R R R R VR VR R

COST 2000 5250 4500 6250 4500 12800 14500 15250 4000

1 Heavy Weapons requires the appropriate Exotic Firearm Feat to properly use. 2 This weapon uses ammunition that is detailed under the Explosive and Grenade section.

* This weapon has special rules, see the weapon’s Description below.

Flambé Thrower This weapon fires a short spray of extremely hot burning liquid that combusts in a 5-foot-wide, 30foot-long line burst of flame that deals 3d6 points of fire damage to all creatures and objects in its path. A flamethrower consists of a pressurized tank containing fuel, connected to a tube with a nozzle. No attack roll is necessary; however the Exotic Weapon (Flame Thrower) Perk is needed to operate the weapon effectively without becoming a crispy critter alongside your opponents; failure to possess the perk results in being caught in the flame. Any creature caught in the line of flame can make a Reflex save (DC 18) to take half damage. Creatures with cover get a bonus on their Reflex save. A flamethrower’s tank has a hardness 10 and 20 hit points. When in use, the tank has a Defense equal to 9 + the wearer’s Dexterity modifier + the wearer’s class bonus. A tank reduced to 0 hit points ruptures and explodes, dealing 1d6 points of fire per fuel left in the tank in damage (max 10d6) to the wearer (no save allowed) and 5d6 points of splash damage to creatures and objects in adjacent 5-foot squares (Reflex save, DC 15, for half damage). Any creature or flammable object that takes damage from a flamethrower catches on fire; taking 1d6 points of fire damage each subsequent round until the flames are extinguished. A fire engulfing a single creature or object can be doused or smothered as a full-round action. Discharging a fire extinguisher is a move action and instantly smothers flames in a 10-foot-by10-foot area. A flamethrower can shoot 10 times before the fuel supply is depleted. Replacing a fuel tank is a full-round action.

M2HB This heavy-duty .50-caliber machine gun has been in service since World War II, and remains a very common vehicle-mounted military weapon around the world. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) perk applies to this weapon.

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148 Equipment - Weapons M72A3 LAW The LAW (light antitank weapon) is a disposable, one-shot rocket launcher. It comes as a short, telescoped fiberglass and aluminum tube. Before using the weapon, the firer must first arm and extend the tube, which is a move action. When the LAW hits its target, it explodes like a grenade or other explosive, dealing its 10d6 points of damage to all creatures within a 10-foot radius (Reflex save DC 18 for half damage); because its explosive features a shaped charge designed to penetrate the armor of military vehicles, the LAW ignores up to 10 points of hardness if it strikes a vehicle, building, or object. This only applies to the target struck, however, not to other objects within the burst radius. The M72 has a minimum range of 30 feet. If fired against a target closer than 30 feet away, it does not arm and will not explode. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (propelled launchers) perk applies to this weapon.

M79

This simple weapon is a single-shot grenade launcher. It fires 40mm grenades (see under Grenades and Explosives, below). These grenades look like huge bullets an inch and a half across; they cannot be used as hand grenades, and the M79 cannot shoot hand grenades. Attacking with an M79 is identical to throwing an explosive: you make a ranged attack against a specific 5foot square (instead of targeting a person or creature). The differences between using the M79 and throwing an explosive lie in the range of the weapon (which far exceeds the distance a hand grenade can be thrown) and the fact that the M79 requires a weapon proficiency to operate without penalty. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (propelled launchers) feat applies to this weapon.

M60 LMG Introduced in the Vietnam War era, this medium machine gun is still in widespread use with the U.S. military and that of several other armies. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) perk applies to this weapon. This is a 7.62mm belt fed light machine gun. It is reliable and proven on many battlefields. It was used either mounted on a vehicle or fired from a bipod or rest. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) perk applies to this weapon.

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The Bushwhack Personal Minigun is a multi-barreled chaingun that fires 5mm ammunition at over 20 RPS. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) feat applies to this weapon. Unlike normal auto-fire weapons, a minigun fires 20 rounds (instead of 10) into the auto-fire area. Due to the increase in the number of ammunition shot from a minigun, the Reflex save to avoid damage is increased to DC 25.

Minigun, Punisher

Bushwhack designed the Punisher as the replacement for their aging Personal Minigun. The Punisher's design improvements include: improved, gel-fin, cooling and chromium plated barrel-bores. This gives it a greater range and lethality. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) feat applies to this weapon. Unlike normal auto-fire weapons, the Punisher fires 20 rounds (instead of 10) into the auto-fire area. Due to the increase in the number of ammunition shot from this minigun, the Reflex save to avoid damage is increased to DC 30.

Minigun, Vulcan

The Vector Junction Company created the ultimate minigun for the military. The Vulcan throws over 40 caseless shells per second down its six carbon-polymer barrels. As the pinnacle of Teutonic engineering skill, it is the ultimate hand-held weapon. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (heavy firearms) feat applies to this weapon. Unlike normal auto-fire weapons, the Vulcan fires 40 rounds (instead of 10) into the auto-fire area. Due to the increase in the number of ammunition shot from this minigun, the Reflex save to avoid damage is increased to DC 35.

Rockwell Launcher

This is a rocket launcher created by the Rockwell Corporation and fires explosive missiles. Ammunition (rockets) for this rocket launcher is detailed in the Explosives and Grenades section later in this chapter. The Exotic Firearms Proficiency (propelled launchers) feat applies to this weapon.

Energy Pistols Energy pistols are high-tech firearms created by the military during the Great War and distributed to citizens for protective use and law enforcement to keep the peace. Energy pistols require the Exotic Firearms (Energy Guns) perk to operate correctly. Firing an energy pistol without this perk imposes a –4 penalty on all attack rolls with the firearm.

Energy Pistols 1 Alien Blaster B52 Plasma Pistol Electro Scorcher EM 500 Laser Pistol MW 1000 Laser Pistol KYJ-X2 Pulse Pistol

DMG 4d10 2d10 4d8 2d8 2d10 4d8

CRIT 20/x3 20 20/x3 19-20 19-20 20/x3

TYPE E E E L L E

RNG 20 30 20 50 80 30

ROF S S S S S S

MAG F F Special I* F F F

SIZE Small Small Small Small Small Med

WT 2 4 5 3 4 5

STR — — — — — —

SCRC UQ R UQ R R VR

COST 50000 7500 35000 3500 6000 12500

1 Energy Firearms requires the Exotic Firearm (Energy Guns) Feat to properly use.

*See item Descriptions or Combat Rules for special information on this weapon.

Alien Blaster This is a unique piece of alien technology, with a serial number that starts with A-51-###, was rumored to be recovered from the wreckage of a flying saucer in the Arizona desert. Strangely enough it can use fusion cells.

B52 Plasma Pistol

This advanced military weapon designed by Bushwhack Arms, shoots a small bolt of superheated plasma powered by the fusion cell.

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150 Equipment - Weapons Electro Scorcher This experimental lightning throwing weapon was created by the US military and was in prototype use in several military facilities when the Exodus hit. Without the sun's rays to charge this weapon's capacitors, this gun cannot make a spark. In full daylight, however, the experimental photoelectric cells that power the Scorcher allow it to fling a bolt of lightning at a target and turn almost anything into a barbeque critter (ummm, tastes like chicken). This weapon stores energy in an internal battery that is constantly recharged in direct sunlight. During night or in areas without natural or artificial sunlight the weapon’s charge lasts for 2 hours.

ElectroMac 500 Laser Pistol

Bushwhack Arms designed this small lightweight laser weapon for civilian use a few years before the Exodus.

Mega-Watz 1000 Laser Pistol

This laser weapon is an upgrade of the ElectroMac 500, designed to pack a little extra punch in the same design, for the United States military and law enforcement.

KYJ-X2 Pulse Pistol

This was an electrical pulse weapon developed by Vector Junction. Though powerful, the KYJ-X2 was never considered a practical weapon due to its inefficient energy usage and bulky design.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Energy Rifles Energy rifles are high-tech firearms created by the military during the Great War and distributed to military forces and law enforcement to keep the peace. Energy rifles require the Exotic Firearms (Energy Guns) perk to operate correctly. Firing an energy rifle without this perk imposes a –4 penalty on all attack rolls with the firearm.

Energy Rifles 1 H&K Gatling Laser EloctroMac 950 Laser Carbine Mega-Watz 2020 Laser Rifle Winchester P94 Plasma Rifle KYJ-Z4 Pulse Rifle

DMG 3d10 3d8

CRIT 20 20

TYPE L L

RNG 70 90

ROF A S

MAG F F

SIZE Large Med

WT 25 8

STR 18 12

SCRC VR R

COST 17500 13500

3d10

20/x3

L

100

S

F

Large

12

12

R

15000

3d12

20/x3

E

50

S

F

Large

12

14

R

14000

4d8

20/x3

E

50

S

F

Med

8

12

VR

27500

1 Energy Firearms requires the Exotic Firearm (Energy Guns) Perk to properly use.

H&K Gatling Laser This Gatling gun was designed specifically for military use and was in the prototype stage during the War. Eight rotating barrels fueled by 8 fusion cells focus a reflected laser at .8666 millisecond intervals fires beams of destructive light towards a location.

ElectroMac 950 Laser Carbine

This is a lighter and cheaper version of the Bushwhack Mega-Watz Laser Rifle and is powered by a fusion cell.

Mega-Watz 2020 Laser Rifle This Laser Rifle is powered by fusion cells so as to deliver a more intense laser beam downrange.

Winchester P94 Plasma Rifle

This is an industrial-grade energy weapon that fires superheated bolts of plasma down a superconducting barrel and is powered by a fusion cell.

KYJ-Z4 Pulse Rifle

This is an electrical pulse weapon that was developed by Vector Junction. It is considered a far superior weapon to the KYJ-X2 pistol, having a greater charge capacity and range. It uses the fusion cell to achieve greater destructive energy output.

Explosives and Grenades Explosives and Grenades cover a range of demolitions and ammunition for propelled firearms.

Explosives These weapons explode or burst, dealing damage to creatures or objects within a localized area. Explosives can be thrown or set off in place, depending on the type of explosive device. Dynamite and hand grenades are examples of these weapons. All explosives must be detonated. Some, such as grenades, include built-in detonators. (Pulling the pin on a grenade is a free action.) Others require timers or various devices to set them off. Explosives require no perk to use with proficiency unless they are fired or propelled from some sort of launcher or other device, in which case the appropriate Weapon Proficiency feat for the launcher is necessary to avoid the –4 non-proficient penalty.

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152 Equipment - Weapons Explosives and Grenades 40mm Fragmentation Grenade Detonator 1 Dynamite Grenade, Fragmentation Grenade, Plasma Grenade, EMP Pulse 1 Landmine Molotov co*cktail 1 Pipebomb Plastic Explosive Rocket 1 Rocket, Armor-Piercing 1

DMG 3d6 1d4 4d10 4d6 5d10 Special 4d12 2d6 3d6 5d8 10d6 8d6

CRIT — — — — — — — — — — — —

TYPE X X X X X/E E X E X X X X

RNG — ― 5 10 10 10 ― 10 5 ― ― ―

RADIUS 10 0 20 20 20 10 15 Special 10 10 10 10

REF 15 12 15 15 15 15 20 12 12 18 18 18

SIZE Tiny Dim Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Tiny Small Small

WT 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 2

SCRC R R I I R R R UN I R R VR

COST 350 Special 100 300 600 850 1250 30 50 600 600 1800

1 See item Descriptions or Combat Rules for special information on this weapon.

40mm Fragmentation Grenade

This small explosive device must be fired from a 40mm grenade launcher (such as the M79). It sprays shrapnel in all directions when it explodes. The 40mm fragmentation grenade has a minimum range of 40 feet. If fired against a target closer than 40 feet away, it does not arm and will not explode.

Detonator A detonator is needed to create a charge to cause a plastic explosive device to Detonator SCRC Cost explode. Detonators come in several forms: Cord R 50 1. Cord – this is old school with a coil of cord and a button to explode Remote VR 600 when pressed. A coil is generally 50 feet long. A Demolition (DC 15) skill Timer R 120 check is required to properly set up the cord and detonator. Trap Wire R 80 2. Remote – this is a fusion-powered remote that is set to a frequency defined by the user to cause an explosion when the remote is activated. Remotes are Very Rare to find or purchase and require a Demolition (DC 25) skill check to properly set the remote and detonator frequency. 3. Timer – this device can be set to explode after a certain time that is set passes. A Demolition (DC 15) skill check is required to properly set the time. 4. Trap Wire – this type of detonator is triggered when a wire pulls a pin out of the device that creates a spark to detonate the device. This type of detonator and explosive is generally used to rig doors, and hidden in hallways or alleys. A Demolition (DC 20) skill check is required to properly set the detonator and wire.

Dynamite This is a basic explosive generally used for industrial or mining purposes. This generally contains four sticks and a detonation timer. Using dynamite requires a Demolition DC 15 skill check to set the detonation timer. Additional sticks of dynamite may be added to a bundle of dynamite to increase damage by 1d10 per stick (up to a maximum of 12d10)

Grenades All grenades have a delayed detonation switch or pull pin, that allow the user to throw the grenade and have it explode within a few seconds of contact with the target.

Grenade, EMP Pulse This is an electromagnetic pulse grenade that generates a magnetic field on detonation. This grenade instantly destroys all electronic devices and robots in the radius of denotation, fusing together their electronic components making scavenging electronic components impossible.

Grenade, Fragmentation

This grenade contains a small amount of high explosives. The container itself forms most of the damaging fragments.

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This is a magnetically sealed plasma grenade that creates a blast of superheated plasma on denotation.

Landmine A landmine is a weight sensitive explosive that detonates when weight is applied to a pressure plate on top. Landmines are generally hidden in brush, under a light layer of earth, or a pile of scrap.

Molotov co*cktail

This is an improvised incendiary device made by filling a glass bottle with combustible liquid (booze) and attaching a fuse (often a rag stuffed down the neck of the bottle). This is thrown after lighting the fuse and will ignite an object or area when it hits and breaks. A Molotov co*cktail can be made with a Craft (chemical) or Demolitions (DC 10) skill check or an Intelligence check (DC 15). Any creature or flammable object that takes a direct hit from the co*cktail catches on fire, and takes 1d6 points of fire damage each subsequent round until the flames are extinguished. A fire engulfing a single creature or object can be doused or smothered as a full-round action. Additionally, anyone adjacent to the targeted area suffers splash damage of 1 point of energy (fire) damage.

Pipebomb This homemade bomb consists of metal fragments, nails, or small metal balls packed into a pipe with black powder and a fuse. This is thrown after lighting the fuse and will explode when the fuse ignites the black powder. The fuse can be set to any length so as to alter the time of the explosion; however, this requires a Demolitions (DC 10 +1 per fuse round) skill check. Generally 1 inch of fuse equals one full-round action (which is enough time to allow the user to light the fuse as a move action and throw the bomb as a standard action). A Pipebomb can be made with a Demolitions (DC 15) skill check.

Plastic Explosive

This is an advanced explosive generally used by the military. It requires a detonator to use and can also be used by remote. Setting the detonation timer requires a Demolition DC 20 skill check and can be detonated by timer or remote.

Rocket A rocket is ammunition fired from the Rockwell Rocket Launcher (see heavy weapons above) and explodes like a grenade when it hits a target (regardless of where the target is).

Rocket, Armor Piercing Armor-piercing rockets were designed as an anti-tank missile weapon to cause great damage to vehicles and structures. This type of rocket functions as a normal rocket, but also ignores 10 points of DR and hardness.

Energy Melee Weapons Energy melee weapons are simply archaic weapons equipped with magnetic source to produce an electrical charge upon impact. Energy melee weapons require the Exotic Weapon (Energy Weapon) perk to operate correctly. Using an energy weapon without this perk imposes a –4 penalty on all attack rolls with the weapon.

Energy Melee Weapons1

DMG

CRIT

TYPE

MAG

SIZE

WT

Cattle Prod

1d10

20

E

F

Med

3

Cutter Plasma Knife

3d4

19-20

P

F

Small

2

Power Fist

2d6

20

P

F

Small

7

Stun Club 2

20

E

F

Med

2

PROF Exotic Weapon Exotic Weapon Exotic Weapon Exotic Weapon

SCRC

COST

I

600

R

1900

I

2200

VR

4100

1 Energy Weapons requires the Exotic Weapon (Energy Weapon) Feat to properly use. 2 This weapon does not deal damage; see weapon Description for more detail.

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154 Equipment - Weapons Cattle Prod

The Farmer's Best Friend model cattle prod uses a fusion cell to deliver an intense electrical shock to those stubborn beast and slaves.

Cutter Plasma Knife

This plasma knife by Savage Arms gets so hot, you’ll won’t have to worry about it slicing through butter, it melt’s it. The plasma knife uses a fusion cell in the handle to super heat up the sharp combat blade in micro seconds with a push of a button. This knife can also be used as a standard Combat Knife (see stats for Combat Knife in melee weapons).

Power Fist The Big Pimpin Power Fist by Savage Arms delivers enhanced impact damage to unarmed combat punches and comes with a power belt to utilize two fusion cells for long lasting bitch slappin action.

Stun Club

The infamous Stun Club by Bushwhack, was designed for police to incapacitate criminals, and was widely used in prison. However, this weapon was sold on the black market, and became known as the new-date rape drug, as perverts used it on unsuspecting woman. This club-like weapon uses a fusion cell in the handle and is activated with a push of a button and charges electric posts in a ring at the tip of the club. When charged and the club is touched to a person’s body (touch attack), it expels the electric charge, causing a stunning effect. A target hit with this charge must succeed a Fortitude save DC 13 or become stunned for a number of round that the save failed by. If the wielder targets the head (- 6 to hit), then the Fortitude save is DC 18.

Melee Weapons Melee weapons are used in close combat, and they are generally among the simplest types of weapons. The feat that provides proficiency with these weapons varies from weapon to weapon; some are considered simple weapons (covered by the Simple Weapons Proficiency feat); others are archaic (Archaic Weapons Proficiency) or Melee Weapons DMG CRIT SIZE WT PROF SCRC COST exotic (Exotic Melee Weapon Axe 1d8 20/x3 Med 5 archaic I 90 Proficiency). Baseball Bat Brass Knuckles Cleaver Club Combat Knife Crowbar Knife Hatchet Lead Pipe Machete Pistol whip Rifle butt Police Baton Sharpened Pole Sharpened Stick Shiv* Sledgehammer Spear Spiked Knuckles Super Sledge Switchblade Wakizashi Wrench

1d6 1d4 1d6 1d4 1d4 1d6 1d3 1d6 1d6 1d6 1d4 1d6 1d4 1d6 1d2 1d3 1d8 1d8 1d6 2d8 1d3 1d10 1d6

20 20 19–20 20 19-20 20 19-20 20 20 19–20 20 20 20 20 20 19-20 20 20 20 20 19-20 18-20 20

Med Tiny Small Med Tiny Med Tiny Small Med Small Small Large Med Large Small Tiny Large Large Tiny Large Tiny Small Med

4 2 2 1 5 4 3 2 — — 2 5 1 12 5 12 2 4

simple simple simple simple simple simple simple archaic simple archaic simple simple simple simple simple simple simple archaic simple simple simple archaic simple

UN C C C UN UN UN I C I — — UN C C C UN UN C R UN R UN

45 40 20 2 165 65 20 35 25 60 — — 30 5 0 2 120 80 60 3750 50 2000 65

A character’s Strength modifier is always added to a melee weapon’s attack roll and damage roll.

Axe

The axe is a relic from the time of firefighters and lumberjacks. Most axes are composed of a fiberglass or hickory handle with a carbon-steel chopping head. The Axe deals slashing damage when employed as a weapon and ignores 5 points of hardness against wooden objects.

Baseball Bat

This is a hardwood bat once used in a game called baseball; this is a common melee weapon in the Wasteland.

* See item Descriptions or Combat Rules for special information on this weapon.

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Brass Knuckles

These pieces of molded metal fit over the outside of a character’s fingers and allow him or her to deal lethal damage with an unarmed strike instead of non-lethal damage. A strike with brass knuckles is otherwise considered an unarmed attack. When used by a character with the Brawl feat, brass knuckles increase the base damage dealt by an unarmed strike by +1 and turn the damage into lethal damage.

Cleaver Heavy kitchen knives can be snatched up for use as weapons in homes and restaurants.

Club Almost anything can be used as a club. This entry represents the wooden nightsticks sometimes carried by police forces.

Combat Knife A high-quality combat knife, one common model was the Stallona from SharpWit, Inc., with an edge guaranteed to stay sharp for over a decade of use.

Crowbar This is a very solid and heavy piece of metal, specially designed to exert leverage (adding +4 to STR for prying something open) or beating heads.

Knife

This category of weapon includes hunting knives, butterfly or “balisong” knives, and switchblades. A character can select the Weapon Finesse feat to apply his or her Dexterity modifier instead of Strength modifier to attack rolls with a knife.

Hatchet

This light axe is a chopping tool that deals slashing damage when employed as a weapon.

Machete

This long-bladed tool looks much like a short, lightweight sword, but with a blade on one side only.

Pistol Whip

Using a pistol as a melee weapon can deal greater damage than attacking unarmed. No weight or purchase DC is given for this weapon, since both vary depending on the pistol used.

Police Baton

This is a hardwood baton designed for law enforcement officers.

Rifle Butt

The butt of a rifle can be used as an impromptu club.

Sharpened Pole

This is a 4 foot to 6 foot length of wooden or plastic pole with a roughly sharpened end.

Sharpened Stick This is a short length of wood or plastic with a roughly sharpened end that is held in one hand.

Shiv This is a crudely made small knife; any attack with this weapon suffers a –1 accuracy penalty to attack and damage rolls.

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156 Equipment - Weapons Sledgehammer This is a huge hammer on a 4 foot pole, used for breaking up walls and heads.

Spear This is a pole-arm with a hardwood or metal shaft and a sharp metal blade fastened to the end.

Spiked Knuckles

This is an improved version of the classic brass knuckles. These do more damage, tearing into the flesh of your opponent in unarmed combat. A strike with spiked knuckles is otherwise considered an unarmed attack. When used by a character with the Brawl feat, spiked knuckles increases the base damage dealt by an unarmed strike by +2 and turn the damage into lethal damage.

Super Sledge

The Disciple of Steel, using the finest weapons technology available, manufactures this Sledge Hammer, for their ground troops. It includes a kinetic energy storage device, to increase knockback.

Switchblade

This is a small folding knife with a spring that pushes the blade open when a button on the handle is pressed.

Wakizashi

This is a finely crafted Japanese short sword largely found in the San Francisco area. A Wakizashi blade is usually covered in Japanese symbols denoting the family lineage and is extremely sharp and resistant to aging effects.

Wrench This is a large, heavy-duty mechanic’s wrench used for repairs and the occasional head bash.

Improvised Weapons Any portable object can be used as a weapon in a pinch. In most cases, an object can be wielded either as a melee weapon or a ranged weapon. A character takes a –4 penalty on his attack roll when wielding or throwing an improvised weapon. An improvised weapon is not considered simple, archaic, or exotic, so weapon proficiency feats cannot offset the –4 penalty. A character can effectively wield or throw an object of his size category or smaller using one hand. A character can effectively wield or throw an object one size category larger than himself using two hands. An improvised thrown weapon has a range increment of 10 feet. Increase the range increment for creatures of Large size or larger as follows: Large 15 feet, Huge 30 feet, Gargantuan 60 feet, Colossal, 120 feet.

Improvised Weapon Damage by Size Object Size Examples

Damage

Diminutive Tiny

1 1d2

Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal

Ashtray, CD disk case, crystal paperweight Fist-sized rock, mug, screwdriver, softball, flashlight, wrench Bottle, drill, fire extinguisher, flower pot, helmet, metal hubcap, vase Bar stool, brick, briefcase, bowling ball, garbage can lid, hockey stick, nail gun Empty garbage can, guitar, computer monitor, office chair, tire iron 10-foot ladder, mailbox, oil barrel, park bench, sawhorse Desk, dumpster, file cabinet, large sofa, soda machine Junked vehicle, stoplight, telephone pole

1d3 1d4 1d6 1d8 2d6 2d8

Damage: Improvised weapons deal lethal damage based on their size, although the Overseer may adjust the damage of an object that is especially light or heavy for its size. The wielder’s Strength modifier applies only to damage from Tiny or Larger improvised weapons; do not apply the wielder’s Strength modifier to

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 damage from Diminutive objects. The Improvised Weapon Damage by Size table gives the damage for improvised weapons of varying size. Improvised weapons threaten a critical hit on a natural roll of 20. Improvised weapons of Fine size deal no damage. Unlike real weapons, improvised weapons are not designed to absorb damage. They tend to shatter, bend, crumple, or fall apart after a few blows. An improvised weapon has a 50% chance of breaking each time it deals damage or, in the case of thrown objects, strikes a surface (such as a wall) or an object larger than itself.

Thrown Weapons Some weapons are made to be thrown, and the common folk know how to stone.

Thrown Weapons DMG CRIT RNG ROF SIZE Javelin Rock Shiruken Spear Throwing Knife*

1d6 1d2 1d4 1d8 1d4

20 20 20 20 20

30 20 10 10 10

1 1 1 1 1

Med Tiny Tiny Large Tiny

WT 2 5 -

PROF simple simple archaic archaic simple

SCRC C C I C C

COST 10 0 5 80 30

Javelin

This light, flexible spear built for throwing can be used in melee, but since it is not designed for it, characters using it in this manner are always considered non-proficient and take a –4 penalty on their melee attack rolls.

Rock This is a handy improvised thrown missile.

Shuriken

A shuriken is a thrown, star-shaped projectile with four to eight razor-sharp points. A character may draw a shuriken as a free action.

Spear See above; also used as a thrown missile.

Throwing Knife

This is a small knife designed for throwing. The user receives a +1 accuracy bonus when throwing the knife but incurs a –2 penalty when using the knife in melee.

Bows and Projectile Weapons Bows are fired projectiles made of wood and metal that can generally be found in use by Tribals.

Bows Arbalest Compound Bow Crossbow Short Bow Sling Shot Wrist Crossbow

DMG 3d6 1d8 1d10 1d6 1d2 1d4

CRIT 19-20 x3 19-20 x3 19-20 19-20

RNG 90 40 40 40 15 10

ROF ½ 1 1 1 1 1

SIZE Large Large Large Large Small Med

WT 10 3 6 2 0 1

PROF simple simple simple simple simple simple

SCRC VR I UN UN C R

COST 5000 500 2500 300 10 750

Arbalest

This is a very heavy crossbow fired from a rest or mount that uses a geared crank to load. This crossbow is generally from on the battlements of a wasteland town, or mounted to a dune buggy.

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158 Equipment - Armor Compound Bow This is a pre-war bow that uses pulleys to amplify the user’s strength so that the pull of the bow can be increased. A character’s Strength modifier applies to damage rolls made when using this weapon.

Crossbow This is a lightweight crossbow used for combat or hunting; it is co*cked by manually drawing the string back.

Short Bow This is a simple lightweight wooden or plastic bow, usually home made, used for hunting.

Sling Shot

This simple weapon is the crossbow of the incarcerated; some elastic from your underwear and a Yshaped object, and you’re in business to fling small projectiles at any guard.

Wrist Crossbow This is a short-range mini-crossbow that can be fastened to the wrist for easy use and intimidation.

Armor All sort of Wasteland dwellers wear armor to better protect themselves from the hazards of the Wastes, such as beasties, mutants, and of course the evils of man. Armor increases the wearer’s Defense bonus by the listed amount on the charts below if the wearer has the proficient armor feat to wear the armor correctly. Three feats cover proficiency in the use of armor: Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), and Armor Proficiency (heavy). Non-Proficient wearers suffer double the armor check penalties to skills and receive a decreased Defense bonus: Light Armor –1, Medium Armor –2, and Heavy Armor –4.

Damage Reduction

Unlike other d20 Modern products, Exodus uses an expanded Damage reduction that falls under 4 categories: Physical DR (PDR) reduces damage from physical damage, such as gunshot wounds and melee damage. Energy DR (EDR) reduces damage from energy damage that include acid, cold, electric, fire, and toxic sources. Laser/Plasma DR (LDR) reduces damage from energy firearms and energy melee weapons. Explosive DR (XDR) reduces damages from explosive and concussion blasts.

Armor Terms

Defense: Bonus to Defense for characters trained to use that type of armor. PDR: Physical Damage Reduction. EDR: Energy Damage Reduction. LDR: Laser/Plasma Damage Reduction. XDR: Explosive Damage Reduction. Dex: Max Dex Bonus. AP: Armor Penalty to Skills. SPD: Movement Speed Allowed. WT: Weight (numbers in parentheses indicate the weight if wearing the armor; the armor weighs much more if carried by hand). SCRC: Scarcity.

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Light Armor For the character who does not want to be bogged down by more cumbersome armor types, a leather garment or some sort of concealable armor is just the ticket.

Light Armor Cloth Armor Leather Jacket Improvised Armor/Shield* Leather Armor Riot Shield* Field Suit Leather Armor Mk II Undercover Vest Combat Leather Jacket Concealed Mesh Vest

Defense +1 +1 +1

PDR 0 0 0

EDR 0 0 0

LDR 0 0 0

XDR 0 0 0

Dex +8 +8 +3

AP 0 0 -1

SPD 30 30 30

WT 5 4 4

SCRC C C C

Cost 150 250 0

+2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

1 2 1 1 2 1 2

0 2 1 0 1 0 1

0 0 1 0 1 0 1

0 2 1 1 0 0 0

+6 +4 +6 +5 +5 +4 +5

-1 -1 -1 0 -2 -2 -2

30 30 30 30 30 30 30

8 5 6 10 3 7 5

UN R R R I I VR

700 1000 1800 1000 1200 1000 2500

* Shields defense and DR stacks with an Armor’s Defense and DR, see item Descriptions more information on this type of armor.

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160 Equipment - Armor Combat Leather Jacket This is a heavily reinforced and padded motorcycle jacket.

Concealed Mesh Vest This is a lightweight, low profile armored vest that can be worn under normal clothes without being noticed.

Cloth Armor

This armor is for that poor sod that cannot afford a Leather Jacket. It is made of several layers of padded cloth scraps.

Field Suit

This suit was originally designed for pilots and called a Flight Suit. It is a set of lightweight, damage resistant coveralls used by the military for non-frontline troops operating in or near a combat zone.

Improvised Armor or Shield Think those old road signs were useless in the Wasteland, well think again, just some rope a few bullet holes and you have a makeshift breastplate. Improvised armor and shields can at least slow down a bullet before impaling your flesh. An improvised shield stacks with an Armor’s defense bonus.

Leather Jacket

This is an old, heavy motorcycle jacket (usually found with only one sleeve still attached).

Leather Armor This is a lightweight armor made of tanned Buffalo hide.

Riot Shield This standard, clear plastic shield was the policeman's best friend during riots and protests from the 1940 until the Exodus. This shield is roughly 3 feet in length and contours to the left side of the body. A riot shield stacks with an Armor’s defense bonus and DR categories.

Undercover Vest

This vest covers a larger area of the torso, but it is also more easily noticed. It is best used when the armor should remain unseen but the wearer does not expect to face much scrutiny, granting a +2 bonus on Spot checks to notice the armor.

Medium Armor Most medium armor is not terribly heavy, but nonetheless provides a significant amount of protection—at the expense of some speed.

Medium Armor Concealable Vest Environmental Armor Metal Armor Trans-Genetic Mutant Armor Tesla Armor Metal Armor Mk II Combat Vest Concealed Mesh Suit Environmental Armor Mk II Light-Duty Vest Trans-Genetic Armor Mk II Combat Armor Tactical Vest Combat Armor Mk II

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Defense +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

PDR 2 4 2 2 1 2 3 3 4 2 2 4 3 4

EDR 0 5 2 2 6 2 2 1 5 1 2 3 3 3

LDR 1 4 4 2 8 4 2 1 4 1 2 4 3 4

XDR 0 4 2 2 3 2 2 1 6 1 2 3 3 4

Dex +4 +2 +4 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 +1 +3 +4 +2 +2 +1

AP -3 -6 -4 -3 -5 -3 -3 -3 -5 -4 -2 -4 -5 -3

SPD 25 20 20 20 20 20 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 30

WT 4 20 35 40 15 35 15 15 25 8 50 20 10 25

SCRC UN R UN R VR UN R R VR I VR R R VR

Cost 1000 2500 1100 1000 4500 1900 3100 5000 3600 2000 1300 6500 7000 8000

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Combat Armor

This is a full suit of high tech military armor made out of advanced polymers, including a helmet.

Combat Vest This is a heavy armor vest made of advanced polymers and is the core piece of a suit of Combat Armor.

Concealed Mesh Suit This is a lightweight, low profile armored suit that can be worn under normal clothes without being noticed.

Concealable Vest This vest was a standard issue for many police forces, and provides maximum protection in a garment that can be worn all day long under regular clothing. While it may go unnoticed by a quick glance, it is usually visible to anyone looking closely for it, granting a +4 bonus on Spot checks to notice the armor.

Environmental Armor This bulky suit was developed for use in heavily contaminated environments, and is prized in the Wasteland for its ability to protect against biological threats and radiation. Environmental Armor is highly durable against radiation protecting the wearer against 4999 (high) or lesser RAD. Radiation levels that exceed 5000 RAD (severe) begin to affect the wearer normally. Additionally the armor grants the wearers a +10 Fortitude saving throw bonus

against other environmental hazards, such as poison gas, and toxic waste.

Light-Duty Vest

A lightweight tactical vest designed for extended use by riot police and forces on alert for potential attack, this armor sacrifices a degree of protection for a modicum of comfort—at least compared to other tactical body armors.

Metal Armor This crude but effective amour is made of scavenged metal plates.

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162 Equipment - Armor Trans-Genetic Mutant Armor This bulky armor designed by US Military to fit Trans-Genetics is made of metal plates, leather, and plastic. Trans-Genetic Mutants can only wear this armor.

Tactical Vest The standard body armor for police tactical units, this vest provides full-torso protection in the toughest flexible protective materials available.

Tesla Armor This was constructed from plans left by Nikola Tesla over a century before the war even started. Though his plans looked completely insane, they, of course, worked like a charm. The shining armor provides superior protection against energy attacks. The three shoulder mounted Tesla Attraction Coil Rods disperse a large percentage of directed energy attacks.

Heavy Armor For the best protection money can buy, go with heavy armor, but watch out for the armor penalty. Heavy Armor Power Armor Hardened Power Armor* Advanced Power Armor* Advanced Power Armor Mk II* Space Armor Space Armor Mk II

Defense +10 +10 +11 +12 +6 +7

PDR 7 8 9 10 3 3

EDR 7 7 8 8 5 5

LDR 8 8 8 9 5 5

XDR 6 7 7 7 3 3

Dex 0 0 0 0 0 0

AP -8 -8 -7 -6 -6 -5

SPD 30 30 30 30 20 20

WT (25) (25) (30) (35) (35) (40)

SCRC R VR VR VR VR VR

Cost 12500 15000 20000 25000 9500 11000

* See item Descriptions or Combat Rules for special information on this weapon

Power Armor Power Armor was developed before the Exodus for use by the military and police forces by RoboCore. This advanced heavy infantry armor has a back mounted fusion battery pack and powered servo assisted movement, enhancing the wearer’s strength and enabling him to move easily in the weighty armor. Wearers of Power Armor gain a +4 mechanical bonus to Strength.

Hardened Power Armor

Improved by Mitsunami, this power armor is chemically hardened version of RoboCore original making the armor more resistant to attacks.

Advanced Power Armor This is a suit of Power Armor with improved design is developed by the Steel Disciples. The armor uses advanced lightweight metal alloys and ceramic plates with powered servo assisted movement. These types of armor are always found with Steel Disciples engraved emblems on the armor chest plate and shoulder guards.

Space Armor

This bulky armored suit has full life-support and is designed to be used in space exploration and EVA events. The wearer of this suit is immune to poisonous gas or other airborne ailments.

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Upgrades and Modifications The following modifications can be applied to certain weapons and armors to make for extended or better performance.

Accelerated Enhancement

Projectile

Upgrade or Modification Accelerated Projectile Enhancement Enhanced Energy Output Extended Magazine Capacity MK+ upgrade (armor) Scope, standard Scope, electro-optical Speed loader Suppressor

SCRC VR VR R VR I R I R

Craft & Repair 25 30 n/a 30+ 15 15 n/a 15

Cost 2500 4500 Special Special 500 1750 200 850

Some firearms can be modified to propel their ammunition at an accelerated rate. With the increased acceleration of the bullets, this weapon deals +2 damage on successful attack rolls. Should the user roll a natural 1 on an attack roll, however, the weapon jams and cannot be used until a Repair (DC 20) skill check is made to un-jam the firearm. Accelerated Projectile Enhancement can be accomplished with a Craft (mechanic) or Repair (DC 25) skill checks. This service can also be purchased for 2500 coins.

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164 Equipment - Armor Enhanced Energy Output Some energy firearms are capable of over-clocking the capacitors to increase energy output. Over-clocking an energy weapon to enhance damage output increases the damage to the next die type (example 1d6 becomes 1d8). Should the user roll a natural 1 on an attack roll, however, the weapon has a 25% chance of burning up the capacitors and becoming useless. Enhancing the Damage Output can be accomplished with a Craft (electronic) or Repair (DC 30) skill check. This service can also be purchased for 4500 coins.

Extended Magazine Capacity Some firearms can be fitted with an extended magazine. See item Descriptions above to determine which firearms are capable of having an extended clip. Extended clips are Rare and cost normal ammunition price.

MK+ Upgrade A MK+ upgrade is where a normal suit of armor is improved over the previous version, by using different materials, such as lightweight metals with different alloys. Normal armor can be upgraded to MK II with the proper upgrade materials and a Craft (mechanic) or Repair (DC 30) skill check. A MK II Upgrade adds +1 to the armor’s Defense, and reduces the armor check penalty by 1 (to a minimum of 0). For addition MK+ Upgrades add +5 to the DC and the armor Defense increases by +1 and armor penalty decreases by 1 for each upgrade. Example: A suit of metal armor MK IV requires a Craft (mechanic) or Repair skill check DC 40. If successful the armor defense value increases by +3 and the armor check penalty reduces by -3.

A MK+ Upgrade costs the base cost of the armor, plus 50% of the base cost in materials, plus the cost of crafting (20 x Craft DC). The cost of crafting the armor can be negated if done by the character. Example: A suit of metal armor costs 1100 (base cost). Having a mechanic upgrade the armor to MK II costs 1100 + 550 (materials) + 600 (crafting DC 30) for a total of 2250. Upgrading the armor to MK III would cost 1650 (base) + 825 (materials) + 700 (crafting DC 35) for a total of 3175.

Scope

Standard: A scope is a sighting device that makes it easier to hit targets at long range. Although a scope magnifies the image of the target, it has a very limited field of view, however, making it difficult to use. A scope increases the range increment for a ranged weapon by one-half (multiply by 1.5). To use a scope, however, a character must spend a full-round action acquiring his target; but, he then gains a +4 accuracy bonus to the attack roll against that target. If the character changes targets or otherwise lose sight of the target, he must reacquire the target to gain the benefit of the scope. Aligning a scope requires a Repair (DC 15) skill check. Electro-Optical: An electro-optical scope functions the same as a standard scope in normal light. In darkness, however, the user sees through it as if he or she had the darkvision ability granted by night vision goggles.

Speed Loader A speed loader holds a number of bullets in a ring, in a position that mirrors the chambers in a revolver cylinder. Using a speed loader saves time in reloading a revolver, since a character can insert all the bullets at once.

Suppressor

A suppressor fits on the end of a firearm, capturing the gases traveling at supersonic speed that propel a bullet as it is fired. This eliminates the noise from the bullet’s firing, dramatically reducing the sound the weapon makes when it is used. For handguns, the only sound is the mechanical action of the weapon (Listen check, DC 15, to notice). For longarms, the supersonic speed of the bullet itself still makes noise. However, it’s difficult to tell where the sound is coming from, requiring a Listen check (DC 15) to locate the source of the gunfire. Modifying a weapon to accept a suppressor requires a Repair check (DC 15). Once a weapon has been modified in this manner, a suppressor can be attached or removed as a move action.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Suppressors cannot be used on revolvers or shotguns. A suppressor purchased for one weapon can be used for any other weapon that fires the same caliber of ammunition.

Medical Supplies If you get shot, Mommy does not come to kiss your booboo and make it all better. You have to make sure you have medical supplies if you do not want to bleed out or rot with an infection. If you are lucky you can use Medpaks, otherwise you had better hope that the ointment you got from a trader works as an antiseptic. In addition, you can addle your mind with addictive chemicals that have a variety of interesting effects and side effects.

Medical Supply Doctor’s Bag Field Medic Kit First Aid Kit Healing Salve Paramedics Bag Poison Antidote Medpak Super Medpak Trauma Pak

Benefits Doctor’s “tools” and consumable medical supplies (10) consumable medical supplies (10) consumable medical supplies (5) heals 1d3+2 HP Doctor’s “tools” and consumable medical supplies (25) removes poison effects heals 1d8+5 HP heals 4d8+10 HP (lose 10% HP gained after 10 min.) heals 9d8+15 HP (lose 20% HP gained after 10 min.)

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Cost 300 200 100 20 500 50 175 350 800

Doctor’s Bag

This contains the basic tools used by a doctor and allows a doctor to perform surgery. It also contains 10 units of consumable medical supplies (bandages, tape, antiseptics, slings, splints, etc). Using a Doctor’s Bag grants a +4 circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury (surgery) skill checks and a +2 circ*mstance bonus to all other Treat Injury skill checks.

Field Medic Kit

This kit contains 10 units of consumable medical supplies to use out in the Wastes. Using a Field Kit grants a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury skill checks.

First Aid Kit

This contains 5 units of consumable medical supplies. circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury skill checks.

Using a First Aid Kit grants a +1

Healing Salve

This is an herbal concoction, considered to be magical by the Wasteland Tribals. This salve is made up of three components, the Snapper root, sand, and water, mixed into a thick mud-like salve. Healing Salve is rubbed on a wound healing 1d3+2 points of damage, while burning out the infection and cauterizing the wound. Craft (chemical) DC 15; time required 15 minutes.

Paramedic’s Bag This contains the basic tools used by a doctor and allows a doctor to perform surgery. This also contains 25 units of consumable medical supplies. Using a Paramedic’s Bag grants a +4 circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury (surgery) skill checks and a +2 circ*mstance bonus to all other Treat Injury skill checks.

Poison Antidote This is a cure all poison antidote made from the stinger of a Mutant scorpion or snake. The antidote is generally kept in a bottle or canteen and when drunk combats all types of Poisons and removes all traces of any poison after use. Craft (chemical) DC 20.

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Equipment – Health Supplies Medpak

The Medpak created by St. John Mercy hospital in the 1990’s is an injected mixture of healing chemicals that instantly seeks out wounds through the blood line cauterizing wounds and delivers a powerful dose of mitosis to repair the damage. A Medpak heals 1d8+5 points of damage.

Super Medpak The Super Medpak function similar to a normal Medpak, but contains a larger dose of meds that instantly heals massive wounds on a larger scale. A Super Medpak heals 4d8+10 points of damage immediately; however the character loses 10% of the healing gained after 10 minutes, which can lead to a system overdose and death.

Trauma Pack The Trauma Pack function similar to a Medpak, but is packed with a jumpstart of chemicals (to include endorphins and adrenaline) that will get even the dead moving again. This is the supreme mixture of advanced healing chemicals that instantly heals deadly life-threatening wounds. A Trauma Pak heals 9d8+15 points of damage immediately; however the character loses 20% of the healing gained after 5 minutes, which can lead to a system overdose and death.

Chemicals Chemicals (a.k.a. Drugs) are what make the Wasteland go around. Chemicals are costly, but give the user a superior edge over the competition. There are drawbacks such as side effects and becoming addicted. Benefits: Character gain the benefit listed for the drug(s) that their character is taking. The benefit lasts for X amount of time before wearing off and the benefits gained are returned to the normal score or rate. Maintaining Benefits: Should a character have a large supply of a drug, the character can take the drug to stack duration period only, to stave off the after effects for a time. After Effects: Once a drug’s benefits have expired and the numeric value of the changes return to the normal rate or score, only then do the after effects of the drug set in. After effects are temporary ability damage, hit point loss, or another effect. Ability damage is gained back at 1 point per day. Hit Point loss is regained through rest or healing. Other effects return to normal one day later, unless stated otherwise in the Description of the chemical. Addiction: Each time a character takes a drug there is a percentage that the character will become hooked on the drug, requiring the drug on a daily basis or until he breaks the addiction. Addiction and recovery are detailed further in Chapter 5. Craft (chemicals): A character can attempt to make his own chemicals, provided he has a drug lab and the proper ingredients to do so. A list of ingredients and the craft DC are listed in the chemical’s Description.

Afterburner: This small square hard candy comes in an assortment of favors and is the pick me up that all warriors seek in the Wastes; it adds pep to your step and sharpens your senses. Sucking on this candy clears (burns) the sucker’s airways open giving the character improved clarity, movement, and vigor; +10 speed, +2 WIS, and 4 temporary HP for 10 minutes. After the effects of the candy wear off the character suffers –2 penalty to WIS and loses 4 HP. Addiction 20%; Craft (chemical) DC 25, materials needed (toxic waste and gelatin), time needed 12 hours.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Benefits

After Effects 2

Addiction 3

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Cost

Afterburner

+10 Speed, +2 WIS, +4 temporary HP for 10 minutes.

– 2 WIS, – 4 HP

20%

R

150

Black Sunshine

Night vision for 4 hours.

– 10 Spot and reduced vision

25%

R

350

Burnout

+6 Spot/Listen, +4 Reflex save, – 4 WIS, – 2 Will save.

– 4 WIS and Reflex save

35%

VR

600

Inferno 4

+4 DEX, – 2 INT, PDR/4 for 4 hours.

– 6 DEX, +2 INT, take +2 points of damage per hit

20%

1

R

400

– 2 INT, WIS, CHA

15%

R

280

– 6 STR and CON

40%

VR

750

None

10%

1

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None

0%

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– 4 STR, DEX, CON

25%

R

200

– 4 DEX

20%

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Chemicals (Drugs) 1

Mindmeld Mutagen Rad Blocker 2 5 Radium X Vigoroids Voodoo

+2 INT, WIS and CHA for 24 hours. +4 STR and +2 CON for 2 hours. Blocks some harmful effects against Radiation for 24 hours. – 1000 RADs over time +2 STR, DEX and CON for 6 hours. +2 Dex and +1 Karma Point.

1 Drug benefits and after effects do not stack by taking multiple doses of one type of drug unless denoted below; however, taking different type of drugs

with similar effects do stack. 2 Character can delay the after effects by consuming a continuous regiment of a chemical at the end of its beneficial period. 3 Addiction effects and recovery is detailed in Chapter 5. 4 Inferno effects can be taken twice; the second dose adds 50% to both benefits and penalties, however the after effects are doubled. 5 This Drug’s benefit stacks.

Black Sunshine: This eye drop contains chemicals that alter the vision of the user and changes the white of his eyes to black as well as the pupil. When taken the user of Black Sunshine gains night vision (can see as if in daylight) for 4 hours. After the effects of the Black Sunshine wear off, the character suffers a –10 penalty to Spot skill checks and can only see one-half his normal range of vision for 4 hours. Addiction 25%; Craft (chemical) DC 30, materials needed (pesticide and plant root powder), time needed 2 hours.

Burnout: This drug is a powder that is either rubbed on the

gums or inhaled through the nasal cavity. When used, Burnout grants the inhibitor increased awareness and reflexes, however this is through paranoia. The character gains +6 to both Listen and Spot checks and +4 to Reflex saves, but suffers a –4 penalty to WIS and –2 Will save. The effect of Burnout lasts 4 hours before wearing off, at which time the character suffers a –4 penalty INT and WIS and –4 to Reflex saves. The ability score returns at a normal rate and the reflex penalty returns at a rate of 1 every 2 hours. Addiction: 35%; Craft (chemical) DC 30, materials needed (plant root powder, radiated water, and toxic waste), time needed 6 hours.

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Equipment – Health Supplies Inferno: This hyperspray endorphin raises the character’s level of adrenaline to large proportions. The user

gains +4 DEX, –2 INT, and PDR/4 (or adds +4 to his existing PDR) for 4 hours. After Inferno wears off the character gains a –6 penalty to DEX, +2 INT, and gains –2 PDR. The penalties to the abilities score return at the normal rate of 1 per day and the PDR penalty returns to normal after 8 hours. Addiction: 20%; Craft (chemical) DC 30, materials needed (empty hyperspray, morphine, and salt water), time needed 18 hours.

Mindmeld: This mind-enhancing pill increases the consumer’s mental facilities. The character gains +2

chemical bonus to INT, WIS, and CHR for 24 hours. After Mindmeld wears off the character suffers a temporary loss of –2 INT, WIS, and CHA. Addiction: 15%; Craft (chemical) DC 30, materials needed (caffeine, plant root powder, and radiated water), time needed 6 hours.

Mutagen: This drug is delivered by a syringe and through the blood stream. A Mutagen contains a very small dose of concentrated blood of non-radiated Trans-Genetic Mutant. Characters using a Mutagen gain a +4 chemical bonus to STR and a chemical bonus +2 CON for 2 hours. After the Mutagen wears off the character the drug attack the brain cells causing a temporary loss of –6 INT. Addiction: 40%; Craft (chemical) DC 35, materials needed (distilled non-radiated Trans-Genetic Mutant blood), time needed 24 hours. Rad-Blocker 2: This pill is the premier radiation defense taken as a preventative measure against radiation; Rad-Blocker should be taken before exposure to radiation. A dose of Rad-Blocker blocks RAD absorption by 50% for 24 hours but during the following 24 hours RAD absorption is increased by 25%. A second dose can be taken, reducing RAD absorption by 75% for 24 hours; RAD absorption is increased by 50% during the following 24 hours. Addiction: none; Craft (chemical) DC 25, materials needed (iron, sulfuric acid, and salt water), time needed 2 hours. Radium X: This I-V is a chemical that cleans radiation from a person’s system, and also causes headaches and severe stomach upset. The treatment takes time to work. The patient’s RAD level is immediately reduced by 250, after 2 hours the RAD level is reduced by another 250, and after 2 more hours the RAD level is reduced by 500. Addiction: 10%; Craft (chemical) DC 25, materials needed (empty I-V, salt water, and white blood cells) time needed 2 hours. Vigoroids: This pill is a steroid that is highly advanced and very addictive that boost strength and reflexes. The consumer of this pill gains a +2 STR and DEX for 6 hours. After the effects wears off, however, the character suffers a temporary loss of –2 STR and DEX. Addiction: 25%; Craft (chemical) DC 25, materials needed (acid, bone marrow, plant stem), time needed 12 hours.

Voodoo: This drink, much like healing powder, is an herbal concoction made by Tribals and is considered to be magical. This liquid, usually contained in a water pouch, burns like eating battery acid when drunk and causes the tongue to swell, making the drinker slur his words. Voodoo grants the drinker with a +2 chemical bonus to DEX and +1 Karma Point for 6 hours. Once the drink effects wear off the character suffers a temporary loss of –4 DEX. Addiction: 20%; Craft (chemical) DC 25, materials needed (radiated water, bovine urine), time needed 10 minutes.

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Clothing Most people of the Wasteland (except some Tribals whom wear animal bikinis and loincloths) wear clothing outfits from the pre-war era. A suit of clothing weighs nothing when worn—the weight listed is when the outfit is carried as luggage. The items described here represent special clothing types, or unusual outfits that a character might need to purchase. For the most part, clothing choice is based on character concept. It is generally assumed that a hero owns a reasonable wardrobe of the sort of clothes that fit his lifestyle. Sometimes, however, a character might need something out of the ordinary. When that is the case, he will have to purchase it like any other piece of gear. Clothes have two effects on game mechanics: one on Disguise checks, and one on Sleight of Hand checks. First, clothing is part of a disguise. See the Disguise skill Description for more on how appropriate dress affects Disguise checks. Clothes also help to hide firearms, body armor, and small objects. Tightly tailored clothing imposes a penalty on an attempt to conceal an object; clothing purposely tailored to conceal objects provide a bonus.

Outfits Outfits Casual Coat Formal Fatigues Parka Scrubs

Use Simple clothes Outerwear Dress or Suit Military clothes Heavy coat Hospital clothes

WT 2 2 3 2 3 1

SCRC C UN VR I I R

Cost 20 10 1000 500 50 300

An outfit of clothing represents everything a character needs to dress a part: pants or skirt, shirt, undergarments, appropriate shoes or boots, socks or stockings, and any necessary belt or suspenders. The clothes a character wears does not count against the weight limit for encumbrance.

Casual: Casual clothes range from cut-off jeans and a T-shirt to neatly pressed khakis and a handknit sweater.

Coat: An outer garment worn on the upper body. Its length and style vary according to fashion and use. Formal: From a little black dress to a fully appointed tuxedo, formal clothes are appropriate for “black tie” occasions. Special designer creations can have purchase DCs much higher than shown on the table.

Fatigues: Called “battle dress uniforms” (or BDUs) in the United States Army, these are worn by hardened veterans and wannabes alike. They are rugged, comfortable, and provide lots of pockets. They are also printed in camouflage patterns: woodland, desert, winter (primarily white), urban (gray patterned), and black are available. When worn in an appropriate setting, fatigues grant a +2 bonus on Hide checks.

Parka: This winter coat grants the wearer a +2 equipment bonus on Fortitude saves made to resist the effects of cold weather.

Scrubs: This lightweight comfortable outfit was used largely by hospitals before the Great War, and comes in a variety of colors. Scrubs consist of a pair of pants with an elastic band, a matching short sleeve shirt, and white running shoes.

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Equipment – Field Gear Field Gear When someone says “equipment” you probably think of guns and knives. Weapons, however, cannot rebuild a motor, carry your water or supplies, warn you about radiation in the area, or compromise a security system. It is your field gear that takes care of you and keeps you warm at night. Item Backpack Bag, burlap Binoculars, standard Bolt cutter Caltrops (25) Chemical kit Chem-Light Stick Climbing gear Duct tape Fire extinguisher Flash Crystal Flash goggles Flashlight Gas mask Geiger Counter Goggles Handcuffs, steel Lighter Lockpick set Lockpick set, Expanded Lockpick, Electronic Lockpick, Electronic Mk II Lockpick, Improvised Metal Canteen Motion Sensor Multipurpose tool Night Vision Goggles Rope Road Flare RoboCore PA 2000 RoboCore Stealth Belt 1050 Sleeping bag Snapper Super Toolkit Tent 2-person dome 4-person dome VOM Walkie-Talkie Water Skin

Use Holds 50lbs of materials. Holds 100lbs of materials. Extended viewing device for spying on opponents. Heavy wire cutters design to cut though padlocks and fences. Shape scrap metal tossed on the ground to impede movement. Portable chemical lab. 1 use chemical cold light. Grappling Hooks, metal clips, hammer and pitons. Pre-war tape that is super strong. Chemical powder in a expendable container to put out fires. A small portable data storage device. Nuclear goggles to view bright explosions. Fusion Battery operated light. Breathing mask to keep out harmful vapors. Measures radiation. Eye protection. Metal wrist restraints. Portable flame Allows Disable Devise (Open Locks) check with no penalty. +2 bonus on Disable Devise (Open Locks) check. Allows Disable Devise (Open Locks: Electrical) check with no penalty. +2 bonus on Disable Devise (Open Locks: Electrical) check. Allows Disable Devise (Open Locks) check with a – 4 penalty. Holds 1 qt. of liquid. Displays moving targets on a RoboCore PA 2000 display. Folding pliers with multiple tool blades. Grants limited Night Vision (Darkvision). 20 ft. coil of rope. A 1 use chemical flame stick. Portable data storage and display device. Adds to Hide skill. A body bag to keep you warm at night. A pre-war tool kit, needed to make repair checks. Make-shift motel room with dirt floor.

Volt-ohm meter. Short range hand held transceiver. Holds 1 qt. of liquid.

WT 5 1 2 5 2

SCRC C C I UN C

Cost 100 5 400 10 5

6 1/10 10 1 3 1 2 2 5 5 ― 1 ― ― 1 2

R I I UN R R R I I R I I UN UN UN I

3500 65 100 5 250 varies 80 40 225 650 70 35 20 150 400 375

2 ― 2 7 1 3 10 1 6 3 4 10 — 4 7 1 6 2

R C UN R I VR C I VR VR UN I — I R I R C

700 ― 25 800 200 1500 25 35 5000 1800 15 1000 — 25 100 250 350 10

1 The Description for this field gear is detailed in the d20 Modern Core Rulebook. 2 The Description for this field gear works as detailed in the d20 Modern Core Rulebook except where noted below.

Backpack This is a good-sized backpack, made of tough water-resistant material. It has one or two central sections, as well as several exterior pockets and straps for attaching tents, bedrolls, or other gear. It can carry up to 60 pounds of gear. A backpack gives a character a +1 equipment bonus to Strength for the purpose of determining carrying capacity.

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Bag, Burlap

This bag is a durable potato sack and can hold up to 80lbs worth of objects smaller than 2ft. in diameter.

Binoculars Binoculars are useful for watching opponents and wild game from a long distance. Standard binoculars reduce the range penalty for Spot checks to –1 for every 50 feet (instead of –1 for every 10 feet). Using binoculars for Spot checks takes five times longer as making the check unaided.

Bolt Cutter

An exceptionally heavy wire cutter, a bolt cutter can snip through padlocks or chain-link fences. Using a bolt cutter requires a Strength check (DC 10).

Caltrops

Caltrops are four-pronged iron spikes designed so that one prong is pointing up when the caltrop rests on a surface. A character scatters caltrops on the ground to injure opponents, or at least slow them down. One bag of twenty-five caltrops covers a single 5-foot square. Each time a creature moves through a square containing caltrops at any rate greater than half speed, or each round a creature spends fighting in such an area, the caltrops make a touch attack roll (base attack bonus +0). A caltrop deals 1 point of damage on a successful hit, and the injury reduces foot speed to half normal (a successful Treat Injury check, DC 15, or one day’s rest removes this penalty). A charging or running creature must immediately stop if it steps on a caltrop. See the avoid hazard stunt for the effect of caltrops on vehicles.

Chemical Kit

A portable laboratory for use with the Craft (chemical) skill, a chemical kit includes the tools and components necessary for mixing and analyzing acids, bases, explosives, toxic gases, and other chemical compounds.

Chemical Light Stick This disposable plastic stick, when activated, uses a chemical reaction to create light for 6 hours. It illuminates an area only 5 feet in radius. Once activated, it cannot be turned off or reused. The listed purchase DC is for a pack of 5 sticks.

Climbing Gear All of the tools and equipment that climbing enthusiasts use to make climbing easier and, in some cases, possible, including ropes, pulleys, helmet and pads, gloves, spikes, chocks, ascenders, pitons, a hand-ax, and a harness. It takes 10 minutes to remove the gear from its pack and outfit it for use. Use this gear with the Climb skill.

Duct Tape The usefulness of duct tape is limited only by a character’s imagination. Duct tape can support up to 200 pounds indefinitely or up to 300 pounds for 1d6 rounds. Characters bound with duct tape must make a Strength or Escape Artist check (DC 20) to free themselves. A roll provides 70 feet of tape, 2 inches wide.

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Equipment – Field Gear Flash Crystal

This is a portable data storage module with limitless holding capacity and can be used in any form of recordable media made after 2002. The price of the module depends on the information it contains. Usually Flash Crystals are found during exploration, however sometimes merchants come across them, and the Overseer will then determine the cost.

Flash Goggles

These eye coverings provide total protection against blinding light.

Flashlight

This heavy metal flashlight projects a beam 30 feet long and 15 feet across at its end. A flashlight uses a small solar rechargeable energy cell and negates penalties for darkness within their illuminated areas. A charged energy cell powers a flashlight for 12 hours. It takes one hour of sunlight to charge the energy cell.

Gas Mask This apparatus covers the face and connects to a chemical air filter canister to protect the lungs and eyes from toxic gases. It provides total protection from eye and lung irritants. Filter Canisters last for 72 hours before needing to be replaced. A filter canister can be purchase for 25 coins. Wearers suffer a –1 accuracy penalty to attack rolls in combat and a –2 penalty to all Spot skill checks.

Geiger Counter This is a handheld device that measures the level of radiation (RAD) in the area or on an item. The range of effect for the counter is a 100 foot radius.

Goggles These motorcycle goggles will keep the dust and sand out of the wearer’s eyes.

Handcuffs

Handcuffs are restraints designed to lock two limbs— normally the wrists —of a prisoner together. They fit any Medium-size or Small human or other creature that has an appropriate body structure. These heavy-duty cuffs have hardness 10, 10 hit points, a break DC of 30, and require a Disable Device check (DC 25) or Escape Artist check (DC 35) to remove without the key.

Lighter

This handheld portable flame comes in metal container of various designs. A lighter is fueled with combustible liquid (such as booze or gasoline), and is sparked with a flick of a button or wheel creating a one inch tall flame. A lighter can be used for 50 rounds before needing to be refueled, which requires a full-round action.

Lockpick Set

This collection of picks and tension tools are necessary to open normal locks with the Disable Devise (open locks) skill.

Lockpick Set, Expanded

This expanded collection of picks and tension tools are necessary to open normal locks with the Disable Devise (open locks) skill with a +2 circ*mstance bonus.

Lockpick, Electronic

This device is used to defeat electronic security systems and open electronic lock with the Disable Devise (disable security device) skill.

Lockpick, Electronic Mk II

This device is used to defeat electronic security systems and open electronic lock with the Disable Devise (disable security device) skill with a +2 circ*mstance bonus.

Lockpick, Improvised

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A simple piece of wire, or a nail, that allows the use of Disable Devise (open locks) skill with a –4 penalty.

Metal Canteen

This container holds one quart of water or other liquid.

Motion Sensor

A handheld device that can display the location of moving creatures or devices out to a range of 100 foot radius if connected to a display device like a RoboCore PA or computer.

Multipurpose Tool

This device contains several different screwdrivers, a knife blade or two, can opener, bottle opener, file, short ruler, scissors, tweezers, and wire cutters. The whole thing unfolds into a handy pair of pliers. A multipurpose tool can lessen the penalty for making Repair, Craft (mechanical), Craft (electronic), or Craft (structural) checks without appropriate tools on skill checks over DC 15 to –2 instead of the normal –4. The tool is useful for certain tasks, as determined by the Overseer, but may not be useful in all situations.

Night Vision Goggles Night vision goggles use passive light gathering to improve vision in near-dark conditions. They grant the user the ability to see in darkness, also called Darkvision (range 120 feet)—but because of the restricted field of view and lack of depth perception these goggles provide, they impose a –4 penalty on all Spot and Search checks made by someone wearing them. Night vision goggles must have at least a little light to operate. A cloudy night provides sufficient ambient light, but a pitch-black cave or a sealed room does not. For situations of total darkness, the goggles come with an infrared illuminator that, when switched on, operates like a standard flashlight whose light is visible only to the wearer (or anyone else wearing night vision goggles).

Rope This 20 foot length of climbing rope can support up to 1,000 pounds.

Road Flare

This is a one use wax and paper tube filled with flammable materials that is used to mark positions or illuminate a small area. It can also be used to start fires.

RoboCore Personal Assistant 2000 This compact data device is worn on the wrist and has a convenient flip up screen with voice command for easy use. The RoboCore PA 2000 provides several functions: Records, stores, and displays information as text, sound, or video files. Clock and calendar with alarm functions. Auto-mapping via internal gyroscope and motion sensor that enables the user to find and return to any location that has already been visited. 2 Flash Crystal ports GPS positioning (no longer functional due to the destruction of the satellite network).

RoboCore Stealth Belt 1050 This belt by RoboCore is a personal stealth device. When worn it generates a modulating field that transmits the reflected light from one side of an object to the other and grants a +20 Hide skill bonus.

Sleeping Bag

This lightweight sleeping bag rolls up compactly. It can keep a character warm even in severe weather and can also double as a stretcher in an emergency.

Snapper Super Toolkit

This is a large toolkit that includes bits, sockets, and other tools in a variety of sizes that grants a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft and Repair skill checks.

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Equipment – Lifestyle Tent

A tent keeps a character warm and dry in severe weather, providing a +2 equipment bonus on Fortitude saves against the effects of cold weather.

VOM This volt-ohm meter is used to measure voltage and resistance in electrical or electronic circuits.

Walkie-Talkie

The handheld Mega-Watz 1230 is a short-range transceiver that is rugged and dependable. This high-end civilian model allows a character to program in twenty different frequencies from thousands of choices— making it likely that the character can find a frequency that is not being used by anyone else within range. It has a range of 10 miles.

Lifestyle Lifestyle items list the necessities of housing, food, travel, and entertainment in the Wastelands.

Housing Most buildings in Wastelands cities are nothing more than husks and shells with little support to provide adequate shelter. The buildings that do provide shelter are usually grouped together with little damage or have been repaired to make adequate living shelters. These buildings are usually own by Wasteland organizations, merchants, and criminals. Owning a building brings a lot of responsibility and requires maintenance and the ability to maintain ownership in rougher Wasteland cities. Housing Business, small Business, large House, small House, medium House, large Warehouse, small Warehouse, large

SCRC R VR R R VR R VR

Cost 35000 100000 10000 25000 50000 80000 250000

Business: A business is a building that is on a main street in a

Wasteland city. A small business building is roughly 750 sq. feet, while a large business building is around 1500 sq. feet.

House: A house is a small dwelling that has seen little damage or has

been repaired to house people. Most homes are in Wasteland cities, scattered amongst the rubble on the outskirts. A small house is about 300 sq. feet, a medium house around 750 sq. feet, and a large house 1200 sq. feet.

Warehouse: A warehouse is an empty building with a vast amount of empty space for

storage, or other activities. A small warehouse is roughly 1500 sq. feet, while a large warehouse is about 3000 sq. feet.

Lodgings When you are looking for that place to snooze in the big city, or you are tired of sleeping with mutant scorpions or piles or rubbish, then a motel room is what you need. Lodgings can be found in any Wasteland city through motels or the occasional kind citizen offering a boarding room.

Motel Rooms: Motels are run by merchants that have acquired large buildings filled with multiple small rooms suitable to rent out to interested parties. A cheap room rents out for a night and can room 2 people; an average room can house 4 people for a night; and an upscale room can house up to 8 people per night.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Boarding Room: A boarding room is generally someone’s backroom or a spare bedroom of a house.

Entertainment There is not much entertainment in the Wastelands or in Wasteland cities except for three things—drugs, fighter bouts, and prostitutes. Entertainment Fighting Bout Ticket Fighting Bout Entry Fee Prostitution (cheap) Prostitution (cheap) Prostitution (cheap)

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Cost 5 25 25 100 500

Drugs: Recreational chemicals that help pass the time in the Wastelands. Drugs are detailed under the Chemical section of this chapter.

Fighter Bouts: Throughout the Wastelands are fighting arena’s dedicated to the art of boxing and wrestling. These arenas can be anything from old fenced in stables to warehouses converted into a gym. Tickets may be purchased to watch, bets can be made with the bookies, or spectators may even participate for a fee. Prostitution: This is the oldest form of entertainment in the Wasteland. Prostitutes can be found in any city and some cities even have bordellos, like Godiva’s in Vegas. A prostitute’s service is based on a onehour period.

Grub There is a variety of grub to serve as meals in the Wastelands. Some grub can be purchased from merchants for your journeys in the Wastes, while other grub is served at motels or small soup kitchens.

Grub Beer Flat Bread Fruit H Ration Kitchen Meal Lizard Kabob Lizard-on-a-stick Meat Jerky Oomph Rotgut Rum Toxicola Water Wine Cooler

Use Alcoholic beverage in a bottle. Hard but long lasting bread. A strange piece of fruit, odd looking and lumpy. Pre-war military field ration pack. A meal made in a soup kitchen or motel. Cooked lizard meat and vegetables. A cooked lizard roasted in its own skin. Smoked and dried chunks of beast flesh. Energy drink great for mixing. Vile alcoholic beverage. Alcoholic beverage that doubles as a cooking ingredient. Cola that comes in a variety of flavors. Sterilized Military grade water. Fruity flavored alcoholic beverage.

WT .5 .5 .5 1 0 .5 1 .5 .2 1 1 .5 .2 .2

SCRC C C R I UN C C C I C UN C I UN

Cost 1 1 50 10 10 5 10 5 15 20 35 10 40 5

Beer: There is a variety of beers that survived the fallout, such as the favored Black Mamba Swill

and Cottonmouth malt liquor. All beer found in the Wasteland is found in 12 oz. bottles and contains 5% alcohol.

Flat Bread: This hard and dried bread is good for 2 week before going bad. Fruit: This is a curiously shaped and colored fruit that can be found growing on mutated trees in the Wasteland. Some Wasteland sages say that this fruit holds mysterious powers for those that know how to harvest it. This fruit seems to hold for about a month.

H Ration: These are a pre-war military ration that taste like cardboard, but fills your gut. This box of rations is good for 200 years, and the taste never changes.

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Equipment – Manuals Kitchen Meal: This is a delicious meal made at a soup kitchen or at a motel. This is a one shot meal that you eat when purchased, sorry no doggie bags.

Lizard Kabob: This kabob consists of juicy chunks of lizard meat (or at least that what the merchant you bought it from said). This is a one shot meal that you eat when purchased.

Lizard-on-a-stick: A roasted desert

lizard on a convenient stick for easy eating. This is a one shot meal you eat when purchased; ummm lizard, it’s what’s for dinner.

Oomph: This energy drink gives the drinker a kick of endorphins and caffeine for that extra pep to the step. Oomph comes in a variety of strange fruity flavors and is a great mixer for mixed alcoholic drinks.

Drunk and Disorderly

Should a character consume alcoholic beverages, he has the risk of becoming drunk with each new drink. To determine if a character becomes drunk, use the following table to identify the Fortitude save to resist becoming drunk. If the character successful save he suffers no ill effects until a new save is required. Should a character fail the save, then he suffer the penalty below to all d20 rolls for one hour per 5% of alcohol consumed. Alcohol % 20 30 35 40 45 50

Meat Jerky: These smoked and dried chunks of beast-flesh that remain chewylicous and even somewhat nutritious for years, and years, and years . . .

Rotgut: This is a vile form of mixed

Fortitude Save 12 15 18 21 25 30

Character’s Weight Under 100 lb. 101 lb. – 125 lb. 126 lb. – 150 lb. 151 lb. – 200 lb. 201 lb. – 300 lb. 301+ lb.

Weight Bonus –4 –2 –1 0 +2 +4

Penalty to d20 rolls –1 –2 –4 –8 – 12 unconscious

alcohol that contains two or more of the following ingredients: Beer, Brandy, Rum, Water, and/or Whiskey. Rotgut is the popular drink of outlaws and raiders and contains 20% alcohol per shot. Rotgut is found in 40 oz. bottles and contains 20 shots.

Rum: This alcoholic beverage is popular among sailors and kitchen cooks and contains 10% alcohol per 8 oz. drink. A normal bottle of rum is 80 oz. or 10 drinks.

Toxicola: The Drink of the Nuclear Age, Toxicola won the cola wars at the turn of the century to become the most widely distributed cola of the millennium. Toxicola comes in a variety of flavors (cherry, cola, lemon, vanilla, and ground zero).

Water: Water supplies are difficult to come across in the

Wasteland that is not radiated, however many fallout shelters and bunkers had large bottled supplies of the military brand, Sterile Springs, “from your toilet to our filters.”

Wine Cooler: This was a largely distributed lady’s low alcoholic drink by the Barrel & Juice Corporation that comes in 31 flavors. BJ wine coolers contain 2% alcohol content and are found in 12 oz. bottles.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Transportation Sometimes you need to travel between Wasteland locales and the best way to do that is to travel with a merchant caravan on a trade route as shown on the table below. General passage on a caravan costs 1 coin per 5 miles of travel (or the amount shown in the table below), but other arrangement can be made. The chart below shows the general caravan routes and cost in coin for traveling the southwest wasteland. Former State Caravan Route

Arizona Bullshead

Bullshead Phoenix Barter Town Los Angeles Tahoe DS 3 Reno Vegas Wendover Alamogordo

45 No 55 No No No 20 No No

Phoenix 45 No 75 No No No 55 No 90

California Barter Town No No 70 45 No 50 No No No

Los Angeles

Tahoe

55 75 70

No No 45 90

90 No 105 135 No No

50 10 90 No No

Nevada DS 3 Reno No No Y No 50 50 No No 40

No No Y 105 10 50 90 No No

Vegas

Wendover

20 55 No 135 90 No 90

No No No No No 40 No No

No 150

New Mexico Alamogordo No 90 No No No No No 150 No

No

Services Sometimes your skills are not good enough to fix a problem and you have to seek a professional’s help.

Medical: Throughout the Wasteland, doctors can be found in cities and tribal villages where they heal the sick and injured—for a price, of course.

Service

SCRC C UN I I VR I R

Cost 10 per HP 100 1250 25 per HP 100 per HP 50 per HP 75 per HP

Repair: When something breaks that you need, it needs to

be repaired, of course you can try doing it yourself . . . if you have the skill, but it is much easier when you’ve got the cash. Repair is broken up into 4 categories: Armor – this professional specializes in repairing damaged armor. Electric – someone damaged your RoboCore PA and it needs to be repaired, this professional has the tools and components it takes to get your junk up and running again. Firearms – more than likely you have come to see this professional to fix a gun that is broken and is rare. Mechanic – if you are coming to see this guy, you must have a vehicle, lucky you, too bad that people keep shooting it.

Medical (Treat Injury) Medical (Treat Poison) Medical (Surgery) Repair (armor) Repair (electric) Repair (firearms) Repair (mechanic)

Manuals of the Wastelands Through a large distribution before the Exodus, several manuals and tomes survived and can be found in the Wasteland. Educational books from Rad-Tek as well as recreation magazines survived the fallout, and have seen circulation through the Wastelands. Of course the circulation of these books is mostly used for toilet paper, so they still are hard to come by. Books can be used to help aid in particular skills when referenced (as described below in the item’s Description). Using a book to gain a benefit on a skill takes time and the user must be literate in the language the book in which it is written (most books are written in English unless otherwise stated by the Overseer). The amount of time required to gain the skill bonus is listed in the Description of the item below.

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Equipment – Manuals Books Doc Brown’s First Aid Guide Electronics and Gadgets Firepower and Ammunitions Hammer Time “How to” Books Logical Science Cherry Bomb Magazine Rad-Tek Survival Guide Road Warrior Widower’s Guide to Gambling

Use +2 circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury skill checks in the wasteland. +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft (electronic), Knowledge (Technology) and Repair skill checks when dealing with electrical equipment. +2/+4 circ*mstance bonus to one of five gun related skills. +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft (structural) skill checks in the wasteland. +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft (chemical, electronic, mechanical, and pharmaceutical), and Knowledge (science) skill checks, and Repair (electronic and mechanical) skill checks. Collectable magazine of pre-fallout Pin-Up girls +2 circ*mstance bonus to Survival skill checks in the wasteland. +2 circ*mstance bonus to Drive skill checks with fuel-powered vehicles. +2 circ*mstance bonus to Gambling skill checks.

WT

SCRC

Cost

1

I

175

1

R

130

1

R

425

3

R

350

5

R

400

1

VR

1500

1

R

200

VR

650

Doc Brown’s First Aid Guide: Written in the 1950’s by renowned scientist and doctor, Emmet Brown, this first aid guide stood the test of time seeing a high distribution to the boy scouts, free clinics, and waiting rooms. This guide contains the concepts and practical use of first aid skills. When referencing this book, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Treat Injury skill checks. Time required: 10 minutes.

Electronics and Gadgets: This is a book on the field of electronics and electrical gadgets. When referencing this book, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus Craft (electronic), to Knowledge (Technology) and Repair skill checks when dealing with electrical equipment. Time Required: 1 hour.

Firearms and Ammunition: This is a magazine devoted to the practical use of firearms with an occasional biased review. This magazine covers a variety of articles on ammunition, guns, repairs, tactical warfare, and upgrades. Referencing a Firearms and Ammunition magazine is a crapshoot as there are several hundred different issues, and requires a d% to determine the bonus the book will grant. The magazine, once determined, will only give one bonus to the reader. In order to gain a different bonus the character must find additional copies of the magazine with different articles. Time Required: 30 minutes. Firearms and Ammunition d% 01 – 50 51 – 70

71 – 85 86 – 95 96 – 100

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Circ*mstance Bonus +2 bonus to Repair skill checks made to repair or un-jam firearms. +4 bonus to Craft (mechanical) skill checks made to craft a firearm, make standard ammunition, or upgrade a firearm. +2 bonus to Knowledge (Technology) skill checks when attempting to determine a type of firearm or ammunition. +4 bonus on Knowledge (Tactics) skill checks when planning a tactical assault. +2 bonus on Craft (mechanical) skill checks to upgrade ammunition type from standard ammunition to armor piercing or hollow point.

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Hammer Time “How to” Books: This set of books contains information about several different fields of

building, from bomb shelters to normal house dwellings. When referencing these books, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft (structure) skill checks. Time Required: 1 hour.

Logical Science: This set of four books, written by Dr. Spock, contains logical information about several different scientific fields. When referencing these books, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Craft (chemical, electronic, mechanical, and pharmaceutical), and Knowledge (science) skill checks, and Repair (electronic and mechanical) skill checks. Time Required: 1 hour.

Cherry Bomb Magazine: This quarterly magazine contains Pin-Up Girls pictures and news articles

from the late 1960’s to the mid 1980’s, when the company was dissolved for unethical practices. It is rumored that only 56 issues made it into print and that these magazines are extremely rare to find, and can fetch some good coin to the right collector. A museum to this publication can be found in Vegas at the Godiva’s Brothel.

Rad-Tek’s Survival Guide: This guidebook on survival says, “All you need is a walking stick, this guide, and the outdoors.” This is very practical information regarding outdoor life, even if it was printed prior to the Exodus. When referencing this guide, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Survival skill checks when in the Wastes. Time required: 10 minutes.

Road Warrior: This book, written by off-road driving champion, Carlos Andretti, is an old pre-war instruction guide for learning to drive and race off-road vehicles. When this book is studied the character gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to any Drive skill checks with fuel powered vehicles for 24hours. Time Required: 2 hours.

Widower’s Guide to Gambling: This short 6-page pamphlet contains the secrets of gambling.

Produced by world-renown psychic Dr. Blavatsky, this guide contains all of your lucky numbers (based on astrological zodiac signs), tricks, and secrets for gambling in the 21 st century. When referencing this pamphlet, the reader gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Gambling skill checks. Time Required: 1 full-round action.

Vehicles In the Wasteland mobility is king. Those who possess vehicles can prey on those who do not and escape safely beyond the reach of someone who has to travel by foot; but, to keep a vehicle moving the owner must constantly search for fuel. Due to the oil shortages of the pre-war years, cars and military vehicles were produced with fusion power cells instead of internal combustion engines. These power cells can be recharged with portable energy batteries like fusion cells. Vehicles found in the ruins will generally be in poor repair, if they run at all, and will require a skilled mechanic for ongoing maintenance.

Crew: The standard number of crew. In most cases, only one person is needed to drive the vehicle; other crew members serve as gunners or copilots.

Passengers: The number of passengers (in addition to the crew) the vehicle is designed to carry. Vehicles that carry passengers can use that space to carry additional cargo when passengers are not present. Each unused passenger slot allows the vehicle to carry an additional 100 pounds of cargo.

Cargo Capacity: The amount of cargo the vehicle is designed to carry. Many vehicles can carry extra passengers instead of cargo, but doing so is usually a cramped, uncomfortable,

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Equipment – Vehicles and often unsafe experience for those passengers. As a rule of thumb, one additional passenger can be carried for each 250 pounds of unused cargo capacity.

Initiative: The modifier added to the driver’s or pilot’s initiative check when operating the vehicle. Maneuver: The modifier added to any Drive or Pilot checks attempted with the vehicle. Top Speed: The maximum number of squares the vehicle can cover in 1 round at character scale (with the number of squares at chase scale in parentheses). This is the fastest the vehicle can move.

Fuel: This is the amount of miles a vehicle can travel per fusion cell unit. Defense (DEF): The vehicle’s Defense. Hardness: The vehicle’s hardness. Subtract this number from any damage dealt to the vehicle. Hit Points: The vehicle’s full normal hit points. Size: Vehicle size categories are defined differently from the size categories for weapons and other objects. Vehicle Cobra Impaler Colt Switchblade Dune Buggy RoadMaster MK IV Sidecar attachment

Crew 1

Pass 1

Cargo 175

Init -2

Man 0

Speed 350 (35)

Fuel 25

DEF 8

Hard 6

HP 150

Size H

SCRC VR

Cost 175000

1

1

50

+2

200 (20)

50

10

5

80

M

R

17500

1 1

2 5

250 350

-1 -2

0 -1

150 (15) 250 (25)

40 15

8 8

5 10

120 350

L H

R VR

20000 125000

1

25

-1

-2

2

35

S

R

5000

Cobra Impaler

This is the ultimate sports car of the 21st Century designed by American Vintage with the classic styling of an automotive lineage that went back one hundred years. It featured classic analog systems instead of digital and had no computers or electronics that could be damaged by an electromagnetic pulse. The 800 horse power engine could go from zero to sixty miles an hour in half a second.

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Colt Switchblade

This American Vintage class of two-wheeled vehicle can travel on roads or open country. A motorcycle can be fitted with a sidecar.

Dune Buggy

This class of light off-road car was used for recreational desert driving. The body was usually a tubular frame with an exposed engine and other systems. This vehicle can be fitted with a Sidecar.

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Equipment – Vehicles Roadmaster Mk IV

This classic family car from Dynamic Motors was the premier freeway cruiser of the pre-war era with room for six and loads of trunk space.

Sidecar

A sidecar is a metal basket with a wheel located under the center of the basket or attached to the side. The basket can be attached to certain vehicles, such as a dune buggy or motorcycle, and allows one additional passenger and cargo; however, this degrades the performance of the primary vehicle.

Vehicle Movement and Combat For simply traveling from point to point, the vehicle used is largely a matter of personal style and finances. Skill checks are only required in extraordinary circ*mstances. These rules are primarily focused on ground vehicles—cars, trucks, and light military vehicles. The rules can be modified for boats, heavier armored vehicles, and aircraft.

Characters in Vehicles

A character in a vehicle fills one of several possible roles, which determines what the character can do.

Driver: The driver of the vehicle controls its movement. Most vehicles have only one position from where the vehicle can be driven, so the person seated there is the driver. Driving a vehicle is, at a minimum, a move action, which means that the driver may be able to do something else with his or her attack action. There can be only one driver in a vehicle at one time.

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Copilot: A copilot can help the driver by taking an aid another action. The copilot must be seated in a

location where he can see the road and advise the driver (in a car, this generally means the front passenger seat). Aiding the driver is a move action, leaving the copilot with an attack action each round to do something else. A vehicle can have only one copilot at a time. A copilot can also drive the vehicle if the driver cannot or chooses not to, provided there is a second set of controls at the copilot’s seat (usually true in aircraft, but not ground vehicles).

Gunner: Some vehicles have built-in weapons. If such a weapon is controlled from a location other than the driver’s position, a character can man that position and become the gunner. A vehicle can have as many gunners as it has gunner positions.

Passenger: All other personnel aboard the vehicle are considered passengers. Passengers have no specific role in the vehicle’s operation, but may be able to fire weapons from the vehicle or take other actions.

Scale These rules use two scales. If the encounter involves both vehicles and characters on foot, use character scale. If the scene involves only vehicles, and they are likely to move at much higher speeds than characters or creatures on foot, use chase scale.

Character Scale: Character scale is identical to the standard movement scale: It is carried out on a

grid in which each square equals 5 feet. In character scale, most vehicles are large enough to occupy multiple squares on the map grid. How many squares a vehicle occupies is specified in the vehicle’s Description. When moving a vehicle, count the squares from the vehicle’s rear. When turning, pivot the vehicle on the rear square toward which it is turning. When firing weapons, count squares from the location of the weapon. In character scale, more than one ground vehicle cannot occupy the same square.

Chase Scale: In chase scale, each square of the grid represents 50 feet. In chase scale, most commonly encountered vehicles occupy only one square. More than one vehicle can occupy the same square. Vehicles in the same square are considered to be 20 feet apart for the purposes of determining range for attacks. Vehicle Sizes Vehicle Size Colossal Gargantuan Huge Large Medium-size

Vehicle Sizes Size Mod –8 –4 –2 –1 +0

Examples Semi with trailer Tank Highwayman Covega Motorcycle

Vehicles use the same size categories as characters and creatures, as shown on the Vehicle Sizes table. The vehicle’s size modifier applies to its initiative modifier, maneuver modifier, and Defense. (The size modifier is already included in the vehicle statistics under Vehicles above)

Facing and Firing Arcs

Unlike with characters, when dealing with vehicles, the vehicle’s facing (the direction it is pointing) is important. Facing indicates the direction in which the vehicle is traveling (assuming it is not moving in reverse). It can also determine which weapons aboard the vehicle can be brought to bear on a target. A weapon built into a vehicle can by mounted to fire in one of four directions— forward, aft (rear), right, or left —or be built into a partial or full turret. A partial turret lets a weapon fire into three adjacent fire arcs (such as forward, left, and right), while a full turret lets it fire in any direction. For vehicles with weapons, a weapon’s arc of fire is given in the vehicle’s Description.

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Equipment – Vehicles Getting Started Most vehicles can be entered with a move action and started with a second move action. An exception is noted in a vehicle’s Description when it applies.

Initiative There are two options for determining initiative in vehicle combat. First is individual initiative just as in normal combat, where each character rolls separately. This is probably the best method if most or all characters are aboard the same vehicle, but it can result in a lot of delayed or readied actions as passengers wait for drivers to perform maneuvers. An alternative is to roll initiative for each vehicle, using the vehicle’s initiative modifier. This is particularly appropriate when characters are in separate vehicles, since it allows everyone aboard the same vehicle to act more or less simultaneously.

Vehicle Speed Vehicle speed is expressed in five categories: stationary, street, wasteland, high, and all-out speeds. Each of these speed categories represents a range of possible movement (see Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers). Each round, a vehicle moves according to its current speed category. Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers Character Scale Speed Turn Category Movement1 Number2 Stationary3 0 — Street 1–20 1 Wasteland 21–50 2 High 51–150 4 All-out 151+ 8

Chase Scale Movement1 0 1–2 3–5 6–15 16+

Turn Number2 — 1 1 2 2

Defense Modifier +0 +0 +1 +2 +4

Check/Roll Modifier — +0 –1 –2 –4

1 The number of squares a vehicle can move at this speed. 2 The number of squares a vehicle must move at this speed before making a turn. 3 A stationary vehicle cannot move or maneuver.

Declaring Speed At the beginning of his action, a driver must declare his speed category for the round. The driver can choose to go one category faster or slower than the vehicle’s speed category at the end of the previous round. A stationary vehicle can change to alley speed in either forward or reverse. Most vehicles cannot go faster than alley speed in reverse.

Stationary: The vehicle is motionless. Street Speed: This speed is used for safely maneuvering a vehicle in tight spaces, such as alleys and rubble filled streets. It tops out at about the speed a typical person can run. Wasteland Speed: The vehicle is traveling at a moderate speed, up to about 35 miles per hour, and is standard wasteland speed to navigate the Wastes.

High Speed: The vehicle is moving at a high speed, from about 35 to 80 miles per hour. Speeds this quick require Drive skill checks (DC 10 plus 1 per 5 miles over 35).

All-Out: The vehicle is traveling extremely fast, more than 80 miles per hour and requires Drive skill checks (DC 20 plus 1 per 5 miles over 80).

Moving

On his action, the driver moves the vehicle a number of squares that falls within the vehicle’s speed category. Unlike characters, a vehicle cannot double move, run, or otherwise extend its movement (except by changing to a higher speed

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category). Every vehicle has a top speed included in its statistics on Vehicles stats. A vehicle cannot move more squares than its top speed. This means that some vehicles cannot move at all-out speed, or even high speed. Count squares for vehicles just as for characters. Vehicles can move diagonally; remember that when moving diagonally, every second square costs two squares’ worth of movement. Unlike with moving characters, a vehicle’s facing is important; unless it changes direction, a vehicle always moves in the direction of its facing (or in the opposite direction, if it is moving in reverse).

The Effects of Speed

A fast-moving vehicle is harder to hit than a stationary one—but it is also harder to control, and to attack from. As shown on Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers, when a vehicle travels at street speed or faster, it gains a bonus to Defense. That speed brings along with it a penalty, however, on all skill checks and attack rolls made by characters aboard the vehicle—including Drive checks to control the vehicle and attacks made from it.

Driving a Vehicle Driving a vehicle is a move action, taken by the vehicle’s driver. During his move action, the driver moves the vehicle a number of squares that falls within its speed category. The driver can attempt maneuvers to change the vehicle’s course or speed. These maneuvers can be attempted at any point along the vehicle’s route. The driver can choose to use his attack action to attempt additional maneuvers. The two kinds of vehicle movement are simple maneuvers and stunts.

Simple Maneuvers: A simple maneuver, such as a 45-degree turn, is easy to perform. Each is a free action and can be taken as many times as the driver likes while he or she moves the vehicle. Simple maneuvers do cost movement, however, so a vehicle that makes a lot of simple maneuvers will not get as far as one going in a straight line. Simple maneuvers do not require the driver to make skill checks.

Stunts: Stunts are difficult and sometimes daring maneuvers that enable a driver to change his vehicle’s speed or heading more radically than a simple maneuver allows. A stunt is a move action. It can be taken as part of a move action to control the vehicle, and a second stunt can be attempted in lieu of the driver’s attack action. Stunts always require Drive checks.

Simple Maneuvers

During a vehicle’s movement, the driver can perform any one of the following maneuvers.

45-Degree Turn: Any vehicle can make a simple 45-degree turn as part of its movement. The

vehicle must move forward at least a number of squares equal to its turn number (shown on Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers) before it can turn. Making a 45-degree turn costs 1 square of movement.

Ram: At character scale, a driver does not have to perform a maneuver to ram another vehicle—he only needs to drive his vehicle into the other vehicle’s square, and a collision occurs (see Collisions and Ramming). At chase scale, however, more than one vehicle can occupy the same square and not collide—so ramming another vehicle requires a simple maneuver. The driver moves his vehicle into the other vehicle’s square and states that he is attempting to ram. Resolve the ram as a collision, except that the driver of the target vehicle can make a Reflex save (DC 15) to reduce the damage to both vehicles by half.

Sideslip: A driver might wish to move to the side without changing the vehicle’s facing, for instance to change lanes. This simple maneuver, called a sideslip, allows a vehicle to avoid obstacles or weave in and out of traffic without changing

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Equipment – Vehicles facing. A sideslip moves a vehicle 1 square forward and 1 square to the right or left, and costs 3 squares of movement.

Stunts

Stunts are maneuvers that require a Drive check to perform successfully. Unsuccessful stunts often result in the vehicle ending up someplace other than where the driver intended. When this happens, the vehicle collides with any objects in its path. Remember that the check/roll modifier from the Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers table affects all Drive checks made by the driver and attack rolls made by all occupants of the vehicle.

Avoid Hazard: Vehicle combat rarely occurs on a

Hazard Caltrops Oil slick Object Small (tire, light debris) Medium-size (crate) Large (pile of wreckage) Structure

DC 15 15

perfectly flat, featureless plain. When a vehicle tries to move through a square occupied by a hazard, the driver must succeed on a Drive check to avoid the hazard 5 and continue moving. Structures simply cannot be 10 avoided. Also, if a driver cannot make a check (if he has 15 used all his actions for the round in performing other Cannot be avoided stunts), he automatically fails to avoid the hazard. In such cases, a collision occurs. The DC to avoid a hazard varies with the nature of the hazard. On a failed check, the vehicle hits the obstacle. For caltrops, this means the caltrops make an attack against the vehicle (see Caltrops). An oil slick forces the driver to make a Drive check (DC 15) to retain control of the vehicle (see Losing Control). Failing to avoid an object results in a collision with the object (see Collisions and Ramming).

Bootleg Turn: By making a bootleg turn, a driver can radically change direction without turning in a loop. In so doing, however, the vehicle comes to a stop. Before a vehicle can make a bootleg turn, it must move in a straight line at least a number of squares equal to its turn number. To make a bootleg turn, simply change the vehicle’s facing to the desired direction. The vehicle ends its movement in that location, at stationary speed. The DC for a bootleg turn depends on the change in facing. On a failed check, instead of facing the desired direction, the vehicle only changes facing by 45 degrees. Make a Drive check to retain control against a DC equal to the DC for the bootleg turn attempted (see Losing Control).

Facing Change 45 degrees 90 degrees 135 degrees 180 degrees

DC 5 10 15 20

Dash: With a dash stunt, a driver can increase the vehicle’s speed by one category. (This increase is in addition to any speed change made at the beginning of the driver’s action; if the driver increased speed at that time, he can accelerate a total of two categories in the same round.) The vehicle’s total movement for the round cannot exceed the maximum number of squares for its new speed category. (The squares it has already moved before attempting the dash count against this total.) The DC for a dash is 15. The driver can only succeed at one dash per round. On a failed check, the vehicle does not change speed categories. Hard Brake: With a hard brake stunt, a driver can reduce the vehicle’s speed by up to two

categories. (This is in addition to any speed change made at the beginning of his action; if the driver reduced speed at that time, he can drop a total of three categories in the same round.) The vehicle’s movement for the round ends as soon as it has moved the minimum number of squares for its new speed category. (If it has already moved that far before attempting the hard brake, it ends its movement immediately.) The DC for a hard brake is 15. The driver can only succeed at one hard break per round. On a failed check, the vehicle does not change speed categories. Make a Drive check (DC 15) to retain control (see Losing Control).

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Hard Turn: A hard turn allows a vehicle to make a turn in a short distance without losing speed. A hard

turn functions like a 45-degree turn simple maneuver, except that the vehicle only needs to move forward a number of squares equal to half its turn number (rounded down). The DC for a hard turn is15. On a failed check, the vehicle continues to move forward a number of squares equal to its turn number before turning, just as with a simple 45-degree turn. Make a Drive check (DC 15) to retain control (see Losing Control).

Jump: A driver can attempt to jump his vehicle across a gap in his

Vehicle Speed Category

DC Modifier

Alley speed +10 path. To make a jump, the vehicle must move in a straight line a Street speed +5 number of squares equal to its turn number. If the vehicle does not Highway speed +0 have enough movement left to clear the gap, it must complete the All-out –5 jump at the start of its next turn. The DC for a jump depends on the width of the gap, modified by the vehicle’s speed category. On a failed check, the vehicle fails to clear the gap, and instead falls into it (or collides with the far side). Determine damage as for a collision (see Collisions and Ramming).

A shallow gap (1 to 3 feet deep) is equivalent to a Medium-size object; the vehicle may be able to avoid taking collision damage from the failed jump by treating the far Gap Width DC side as a hazard and then continue moving (see Avoid Hazard, 1–3 ft. (ditch) 15 above). 4–8 ft. (culvert) 20 8–15 ft. (creek, small ravine) 16–25 ft. (narrow road, small pond) 26–40 ft. (wide road, small river)

25 35 45

A moderately deep gap (4 to 10 feet deep) is equivalent to a Huge object. The vehicle can only drive out of the gap if the walls are not too steep.

A deeper gap (11 feet or deeper) is equivalent to a Colossal object. The vehicle can only drive out of the gap if the walls are not too steep. If the gap is filled with water, the vehicle takes only half damage from the collision with the ground. If the water is too deep or the bottom is too soft, (Overseer’s discretion) however, the vehicle might not be able to move.

Sideswipe: During a vehicle’s movement, a driver can attempt to sideswipe a vehicle or other target, either to deal damage without fully ramming it or to cause another driver to lose control of his vehicle.

At character scale, a vehicle must be side by side with its target (that is, occupying the square or squares directly to its side) and moving in the same direction. Attempting a sideswipe costs 1 square of movement. Target Condition Each size category larger Each size category smaller Each speed category of difference

DC Modifier –5 +5 –2

At chase scale, the vehicle must be in the same square as its target and moving in the same direction. There is no movement cost.

If the stunt is successful, the sideswiping vehicle and the target both take damage as if they had collided (see Collisions and Ramming), except that the collision multiplier is 1/4, and the target (or driver of the target vehicle) can make a Reflex save (DC 15) to reduce the damage to both by half. If the target is another vehicle the driver must succeed at a Drive check (DC 15) at the beginning of his next action or lose control of the vehicle. The DC for a sideswipe is 15. It is modified by the relative size and speed of the target. On a failed check, both vehicles take damage as though the sideswipe attempt was a success. The other driver does not need to make a check to retain control, however.

Driver Options

Here is what a vehicle driver can do in a single round:

Choose the Vehicle’s Speed: The driver may increase or decrease his vehicle’s speed category by one (or keep it the same).

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Equipment – Vehicles Optional Attack Action: If the driver wants, he can use his attack action before moving the vehicle. If the driver does so, however, he will be limited to a single stunt during movement.

Movement: Move the vehicle any number of squares within the vehicle’s speed category. Along the way,

perform any number of simple maneuvers (limited only by their movement cost). The driver may also attempt a single stunt as part of the movement (or two, if the driver did not take his attack action before moving).

Optional Attack Action: If the driver did not take an attack action before moving, and performed one or fewer stunts, the driver has an attack action left.

Collisions and Ramming A collision occurs when a vehicle strikes another vehicle or a solid object. Generally, when a vehicle collides with a creature or other moving vehicle, the target can attempt a Reflex save (DC 15) to reduce the damage by half.

Resolving Collisions

The base damage dealt by a vehicle collision depends on the speed and size of the objects involved. Use the highest speed and the smallest size of the two colliding objects and refer to the Smallest Object Dice Collision Damage table on the right. or Creature Size Colossal Gargantuan Huge Large Medium-size Small Tiny Smaller than Tiny

20 16 12 8 4 2 1 0

Collision Damage Highest Speed Damage Die Type Alley speed d2 Street speed d4 Highway speed d8 All-out d12

After finding the base damage, determine the collision’s damage multiplier based on how the colliding vehicle struck the other vehicle or object. (For vehicles moving in reverse, consider the back end to be the vehicle’s “front” for determining the collision multiplier.) Consult the Collision Direction table for a multiplier.

Once Collision Direction Colliding Vehicle’s Target Multiplier the A stationary object. x1 damage has been A moving vehicle, striking head-on or 45 degrees from head-on. x2 determined, apply it to A moving vehicle, striking perpendicular. x1 both vehicles (or A moving vehicle, striking from the rear or 45 degrees from the rear. x ½ objects or creatures) A vehicle being sideswiped (see Sideswipe). x¼ involved in the collision. Both vehicles reduce their speed by two speed categories. If the colliding vehicle moved the minimum number of squares for its new speed category before the collision, it ends its movement immediately. If not, it pushes the other vehicle or object aside, if possible, and continues until it has moved the minimum number of squares for its new speed category. The driver of the vehicle that caused the collision must immediately make a Drive check (DC 15) or lose control of the vehicle (see Losing Control, below). The driver of the other vehicle must succeed on a Drive check (DC 15) at the beginning of his next action or lose control of his vehicle.

Damage to Vehicle Occupants

When a vehicle takes damage from a collision, its occupants may take damage as well. The base amount of damage depends on the cover offered by the vehicle.

Cover None One-quarter One-half Three-quarters or more

Damage Same as damage taken by vehicle. One-half damage taken by vehicle. One-quarter damage taken by vehicle. None.

Each of the occupants may make a Reflex save (DC 15) to take half damage.

Losing Control

A collision or a failed stunt can cause a driver to lose control of his vehicle. In these cases, the driver must make a Drive check to retain control of the vehicle. If this check is successful, the driver maintains control of the vehicle. If it fails, the

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vehicle goes into a spin. If it fails by 10 or more, the vehicle rolls. Remember that the check/roll modifier from the Vehicle Speeds and Modifiers table applies to all Drive checks. An out-of-control vehicle may strike an object or other vehicle. When that happens, a collision occurs (see Collisions and Ramming, above).

Spin: The vehicle skids, spinning wildly. At character scale, the vehicle moves in its current direction a number of squares equal to the turn number for its speed, then ends its movement. Once it stops, roll 1d8 to determine its new facing: 1, no change; 2, right 45 degrees; 3, right 90 degrees; 4, right 135 degrees; 5, 180 degrees; 6, left 135 degrees; 7, left 90 degrees; 8, left 45 degrees. Reorient the vehicle accordingly. At chase scale, the vehicle moves 1 square and ends its movement. Roll to determine its new facing as indicated above.

Roll: The vehicle tumbles, taking damage. At character scale, the vehicle rolls in a straight line in its

current direction for a number of squares equal to the turn number for its speed, then ends its movement. At the end of the vehicle’s roll, reorient the vehicle perpendicular to its original direction of travel (determine left or right randomly). At chase scale, the vehicle rolls one square before stopping and reorienting. At either scale, a vehicle takes damage equal to 2d6 x the character scale turn number for its speed (use the turn number from character scale even at chase scale). The vehicle’s occupants take damage equal to 2d4 x the character scale turn number for its speed (Reflex save, DC 15, for half damage).

Hide and Seek

When being pursued, a driver can attempt a Hide check to lose the pursuer in heavy traffic, or a Bluff check to misdirect the pursuer before turning onto an off-ramp or a side street. To make a Hide check, use the normal rules for hiding (see the Hide skill Description). The normal size modifiers apply, but because the driver is hiding among other vehicles, most of which are size Large or Huge, he gains a +8 bonus on the check. This use of the Hide skill can only be attempted in fairly heavy traffic; in lighter traffic, the Overseer might not allow it or might apply a penalty to the check. A driver can use Bluff to make a pursuer think he is going a different direction from what the driver intends. Just before making a turn onto an off-ramp or side street, make a Bluff check opposed by the pursuer’s Sense Motive check. If the driver is successful, the pursuer takes a –5 penalty on any Drive check needed to make the turn to follow the driver. If the other driver can make the turn using only simple maneuvers and does not have to make a Drive check, the Bluff attempt has no effect.

Fighting from Vehicles The following rules provide a further framework for combat involving vehicles.

Vehicle Combat Actions

Actions during vehicle combat are handled the same way as actions during personal combat. In general, a character can take two move actions, one move action and one attack action, or one full-round action in a round. Free actions can be performed normally, in conjunction with another action.

Free Actions: Communicating orders is a free action. Characters can perform as many free actions as the Overseer permits in a single round.

Move Actions: Changing position within a vehicle is usually a move action, especially if the character has to trade places with another character. If the character’s movement is short and unobstructed, the character can do it as the equivalent of a 5-foot step. Otherwise, it requires a move action.

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Equipment – Vehicles Attack Actions: Anyone aboard a vehicle can make an attack with a personal weapon, and drivers and gunners can make attacks with any vehicle-mounted weapons controlled from their positions.

Full-Round Actions: Since the driver must use a move action to control the vehicle, he cannot take a full-

round action unless he starts it in one round and completes it on his next turn (see Start/Complete FullRound Action).

Attack Options

Firing a vehicle’s weapon requires an attack action and uses the driver’s or gunner’s ranged attack modifier. A driver with 5 or more ranks in the Drive skill gains a +2 synergy bonus when firing vehicle-mounted weapons while driving.

Driving Defensively: One can fight defensively while driving a vehicle, just as in melee combat. This grants a +2 dodge bonus to the vehicle’s Defense and applies a –4 penalty on attack rolls made by occupants of the vehicle. Total Defense: A driver can choose the total defense action that grants a +4 dodge bonus to Defense but

does not allow the driver to attack (gunners or passengers take a –8 penalty on attack rolls). These modifiers last until the driver’s next round of actions.

Full Attack Action: A driver cannot normally make a full attack, since controlling the vehicle

requires a move action.

Gunners or passengers, however, can take full attack actions, since they do not have to use a move action (except, perhaps, to change positions in the vehicle). In general, taking a full attack action is useful only if a character has a base attack bonus high enough to get multiple attacks. A passenger can make multiple attacks with his own weapon. A gunner can make multiple attacks with one or more weapons controlled from his position.

Targeting Occupants An attack made against a vehicle uses the vehicle’s Defense, modified by its speed category. Attackers can choose instead to target specific vehicle occupants. An attack against a vehicle occupant is made like any other attack. Remember, however, that a character in a vehicle gains bonuses to Defense from both the vehicle’s speed and any cover it provides.

Cover When a character fires from a vehicle, objects or other vehicles in the way can provide cover for the target.

Damaging Vehicles All vehicles have hit points, which are roughly equivalent to a character’s hit points. Like most inanimate objects, vehicles also have hardness. Whenever a vehicle takes damage, subtract the vehicle’s hardness from the damage dealt. When a vehicle is reduced to 0 hit points, it is disabled. Although it might be repairable, it ceases functioning. A vehicle that is disabled while moving drops one speed category each round until it comes to a stop. The driver cannot attempt any maneuvers except a 45-degree turn. Unlike characters, vehicles do not “die” when they reach –10 hit points. Instead, a vehicle is destroyed when it loses hit points equal to twice its full normal total. A destroyed vehicle cannot be repaired.

Energy Attacks: Vehicles are treated as objects when subjected to energy attacks.

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Exploding Vehicles: If the attack that disables a vehicle deals damage equal to half its full normal hit points

or more, the vehicle explodes after 1d6 rounds. This explosion deals 10d6 points of fire damage to everyone within the vehicle (Reflex save, DC 20, for half damage), and half that much to everyone and everything within 30 feet of the explosion (Reflex save, DC 15, for half damage).

Repairing Damage Repairing damage to a vehicle takes a full hour of work, a mechanical tool kit, and a garage or some other suitable facility. (Without the tool kit, a character takes a –4 penalty on his Repair check.) At the end of the hour, make a Repair check (DC 20). Success restores 2d6 hit points. If damage remains, the character may continue to make repairs for as many hours as it takes to restore all of the vehicle’s hit points.

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192 Combat and Tactics

Chapter Combat

and

V

Tactics

Combat is played out in rounds, and in each round every player acts in turn, in a regular cycle. Combat usually runs in the following way: 1. Each combatant starts the battle flat-footed. Once a combatant acts, he is no longer flat-footed. 2. The Overseer determines which characters are aware of their opponents at the start of the battle. If some, but not all of the combatants are aware of their opponents, a surprise round happens before the regular rounds begin. The combatants who are aware of their opponents can act in the surprise round, so they roll for initiative. In initiative order (highest to lowest), combatants who started the battle aware of their opponents each take one move or attack action. Combatants who were unaware do not get to act in the surprise round. If no one or everyone starts the battle aware, there is no surprise round. 3. Combatants who have not yet rolled initiative do so. All combatants are now ready to begin their first regular round. 4. Combatants act in initiative order. 5. When everyone has had a turn, the combatant with the highest initiative acts again, and steps 4 and 5 repeat until combat ends.

Combat Statistics This section summarizes the fundamental combat statistics.

Attack Roll An attack roll represents a character’s attempts to strike an opponent on the character’s turn during a round. When a character makes an attack roll, he rolls 1d20 and adds his attack bonus. If the result equals or beats the target’s Defense, the character hits and deals damage. Many modifiers can affect the attack roll. A natural 1 (the d20 comes up 1) on the attack roll is always a miss. A natural 20 (the d20 comes up 20) is always a hit. A natural 20 is also always a threat—a possible critical hit. If the character is not proficient in the weapon he is attacking with (the character does not have the appropriate Weapon Proficiency feat), that character takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll.

Attack Bonus A character’s attack bonus with a melee weapon is: BAB + STR modifier + size modifier With a ranged weapon, a character’s attack bonus is: BAB + DEX modifier + range penalty + size modifier

Strength Modifier

Strength helps a character swing a weapon harder and faster, so a character’s Strength modifier applies to melee attack rolls.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Size Modifiers Size (Example) Colossal (sea serpent) Gargantuan (desert serpent) Huge (elephant) Large (Bison) Medium-size (human) Small (dog) Tiny (pig rat) Diminutive (normal rat) Fine (blood fly)

193

Size Modifier Size Modifier –8 –4 –2 –1 +0 +1 +2 +4 +8

Creature size categories are defined differently from the size categories for weapons and other objects. Since this size modifier applies to Defense against a melee weapon attack, or a ranged weapon attack, two creatures of the same size strike each other normally, regardless of their actual size. Creature sizes are compatible with vehicle sizes.

Dexterity Modifier

Dexterity measures coordination and steadiness, so a character’s Dexterity modifier applies when the character attacks with a ranged weapon.

Range Penalty The range penalty for a ranged weapon depends on what weapon the character is using and how far away the target is. All ranged weapons and thrown weapons have a range increment. Any attack from a distance of less than one range increment is not penalized for range. Each full range increment, however, causes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll. A thrown weapon has a maximum range of five range increments. Ranged weapons that fire projectiles can shoot up to ten increments.

Damage When a character hits with a weapon, he deals damage according to the type of weapon. Effects that modify weapon damage also apply to unarmed strikes and the natural physical attack forms of creatures. Damage is deducted from the target’s current hit points.

Minimum Weapon Damage

If penalties to damage bring the damage result below 1, a hit still deals 1 point of damage. Damage Reduction (the applicable type for the appropriate damage dealt) can reduce damage to 0, however.

Strength Bonus

When a character hits with a melee weapon or thrown weapon, add his Strength modifier to the damage.

Off-Hand Weapon When a character deals damage with a melee weapon in his off hand, add only half of the character’s Strength bonus.

Wielding a Weapon Two-Handed When a character deals damage with a melee weapon that he is wielding two-handed, add 1.5 times the character’s Strength bonus. The character does not get this higher Strength bonus, however, when using a light weapon two-handed; in such a case, only the character’s normal Strength bonus applies to the damage roll.

Multiplying Damage

Sometimes damage is multiplied by a factor. Roll the damage (with all modifiers) multiple times and total the results. Bonus damage represented as extra dice is an exception. Do not multiply bonus damage dice when a character scores a critical hit.

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194 Combat and Tactics Critical Hits When a character makes an attack roll and gets a natural 20 (the d20 shows 20), the character hits regardless of the target’s Defense, and the character has scored a threat of a critical hit. To find out if it is actually a critical hit, the character immediately makes another attack roll with all the same modifiers as the attack roll that scored the threat. If the second roll also results in a hit against the target’s Defense, the attack is a critical hit. (The second roll just needs to hit to confirm a critical hit; the character does not need to roll a second 20.) If the second roll is a miss, then the attack just deals the damage of a regular hit. A critical hit multiplies the character’s damage. Unless otherwise specified, the multiplier is x2. (It is possible for some weapons to have higher multipliers, doing more damage on a critical hit.) Some weapons have expanded threat ranges, making a critical hit more likely; however, even with these weapons, only a 20 is an automatic hit. Each weapon has an indicate threat range listed in Chapter 4 on the weapons tables. Bonus damage represented as extra dice is not multiplied when a character scores a critical hit. Objects (including vehicles) and some types of creatures are immune to critical hits. A 20 is always a successful hit, but deals no extra damage against these targets.

Defense A character’s Defense represents how hard it is for opponents to land a solid, damaging blow on the character. It is the attack roll result that an opponent needs to achieve to hit the character. The average, unarmored civilian has a Defense of 10. A character’s Defense is equal to: 10 + DEX modifier + class bonus + equipment bonus + size modifier

Dexterity Modifier

If a character’s Dexterity is high, he is particularly adept at dodging blows or gunfire. If a character’s Dexterity is low, he is particularly inept at performing these acts. Characters apply their Dexterity modifier to Defense.

Sometimes a character cannot use his Dexterity bonus. If a character cannot react to a blow, that character cannot use his Dexterity bonus for Defense.

Class Bonus

A character’s class and level grant the character an innate bonus to Defense. This bonus applies in all situations, even when the character is flat-footed, or when the character would lose his Dexterity bonus for some other reason.

Equipment Bonus If a character wears armor, it provides a bonus to his Defense. This bonus represents the armor’s ability to protect the character from blows. Armor provides a minimum bonus to anyone who wears it, but a character who is proficient in the use of a certain type of armor receives a larger bonus to Defense. Sometimes a character cannot use his equipment bonus for Defense. If an attack will damage the character just by touching him, that character cannot add his equipment bonus (see Touch Attacks, below).

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Size Colossal Gargantuan Huge Large Medium-size Small Tiny Diminutive Fine

Size Modifier –8 –4 –2 –1 +0 +1 +2 +4 +8

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Size Modifier

The bigger an opponent is, the easier it is to hit in combat. The smaller it is, the harder it is to hit. Since this same modifier applies to attack rolls a creature does not have a hard time attacking another creature of the same size. Size modifiers are shown on chart to the right.

Other Modifiers Other factors can add to a character’s Defense.

Feats Some feats give a bonus to a character’s Defense.

Natural Armor

Some creatures have natural armor, which usually consists of scales, fur, or layers of thick muscle.

Dodge Bonuses

Some other Defense bonuses represent actively avoiding blows. These bonuses are called dodge bonuses. Any situation that denies a character his Dexterity bonus also denies his dodge bonuses. Unlike most sorts of bonuses, dodge bonuses stack with each other.

Touch Attacks Some attacks disregard armor. In these cases, the attacker makes a touch attack roll (either a ranged touch attack roll or a melee touch attack roll). The attacker makes his attack roll as normal, but a character’s Defense does not include any equipment bonus or armor bonus. All other modifiers, such as class bonus, Dexterity modifier, and size modifier, apply normally.

Hit Points A character’s hit points tell how much punishment he can take before dropping. Hit points are based on the character’s class and level, and the character’s Constitution modifier applies. When a character’s hit point total drops to 0, he is disabled. When it drops to –1, he is dying. When it drops to –10, the character is dead.

Speed A character’s speed tells how far he can move in a move action. Humans normally move 30 feet, but some creatures move faster or slower. Wearing armor can slow a character down. A character normally moves as a move action, leaving an attack action to attack. The character can, however, use his attack action as a second move action. This could let the character move again, for a total movement of up to double his normal speed. Another option is to run all out (a fullround action). This lets the character move up to four times his normal speed, but a character can only run all out in a straight line, and doing so affects the character’s Defense (see Run).

Saving Throws Generally, when a character is subject to an unusual or magical attack, he gets a saving throw to avoid or reduce the effect. A saving throw is a 1d20 roll plus a bonus based on the character’s class and level (the character’s base save bonus) and an ability modifier. A natural 1 (the d20 comes up 1) on a saving throw is always a failure. A natural 20 (the d20 comes up 20) is always a success. A character’s saving throw bonus is: Base save bonus + ability modifier The Difficulty Class for a save is determined by the attack itself.

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196 Combat and Tactics Saving Throw Types The three different kinds of saving throws are:

Fortitude

These saves measure a character’s ability to stand up to massive physical punishment or attacks against his vitality and health—such as poison and paralysis. Apply a character’s Constitution modifier to his Fortitude saving throws.

Reflex

These saves test a character’s ability to dodge massive attacks—such as explosions or car wrecks. (Often, when damage is inevitable, a character gets to make a Reflex save to take only half damage.) Apply the character’s Dexterity modifier to his Reflex saving throws.

Will These saves reflect a character’s resistance to mental influence and domination. Apply the character’s Wisdom modifier to his Will saving throws.

Initiative Every round, each combatant gets to do something. The combatants’ initiative checks, from highest to lowest, determine the order in which they act, from first to last.

Initiative Checks

At the start of a battle, each combatant Alternative Option: Initiative makes a single initiative check. An Initiative is the same action sequence each round until the combat is initiative check is a Dexterity check. over. To mix up play, however, have the character’s roll initiative each Each character applies his Dexterity round instead of just one roll for the combat. This allows characters to modifier to the roll, and anyone with go at different times in initiative. Held actions are reset at the bottom the Improved Initiative feat gets of the initiative order, if the character fails to act during the round. an additional +4 bonus on the check. Ready actions are a triggered action and are lost if not triggered and are The Overseer finds out what order not affected by this alterative option. characters are acting in, counting This option does increase the amount of time to combats and is down from highest result to suggested that this option be used with an initiative tracking sheet or lowest, and each character acts index cards. in turn. On all of the following rounds, the characters act in the same order (unless a character takes an action that results in his initiative changing; see Special Initiative Actions). If two or more combatants have the same initiative check result, the combatants who are tied go in order of total initiative modifier (including Dexterity modifier and Improved Initiative bonus, if applicable). If there is still a tie, roll a die.

Flat-Footed

At the start of a battle, before the character has had a chance to act (specifically, before the character’s first turn in the initiative order), the character is flat-footed. A character cannot use his Dexterity bonus to Defense or make attacks of opportunity while flat-footed.

Joining a Battle If characters enter a battle after it has begun, they roll initiative at that time and act whenever their turn comes up in the existing order.

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Surprise When a combat starts, if a character was not aware of his enemies, and they were aware of the character, that character is surprised. Likewise, a character can surprise his enemies if the character knows about them before they are aware of the character.

The Surprise Round

If some, but not all, of the combatants are aware of their opponents, a surprise round happens before regular rounds begin. The combatants who are aware of the opponents can act in the surprise round, so they roll for initiative. In initiative order (highest to lowest) combatants who started the battle aware of their opponents each take an attack action or move action during the surprise round (see Action Types, below). If no one or everyone is surprised, a surprise round does not occur.

Unaware Combatants

Combatants who are unaware at the start of battle do not get to act in the surprise round. Unaware combatants are still flat-footed because they have not yet acted. As a result, they lose any Dexterity bonus to Defense.

Actions in Combat The fundamental actions of moving and attacking cover most of what a character wants to do in a battle. They are described here. Other, more specialized, options are touched on in the Actions in Combat table on the following page, and covered in Special Initiative Actions and Special Attacks.

The Combat Round

Each round represents about 6 seconds in the game world. A round is an opportunity for each character involved in a combat to take an action. Anything a person could reasonably do in 6 seconds, a character can do in 1 round. Each round’s activity begins with the character with the highest initiative result and then proceeds, in order, from there. Each round of a combat uses the same initiative order. When a character’s turn comes up in the initiative sequence, that character performs his entire round’s worth of actions. (For exceptions, see Attacks of Opportunity and Special Initiative Actions.) For almost all purposes, there is no relevance to the end of a round or the beginning of a round. A round can be a segment of game time starting with the first character to act and ending with the last; but, it usually means a span of time from a certain round to the same initiative number in the next round. Effects that last a certain number of rounds end just before the same initiative count that they began on.

Action Types The four types of actions are: attack actions, move actions, full-round actions, and free actions. In a normal round, a character can perform an attack action and a move action (or two move actions; a character can always take a move action in place of an attack action), or a character can perform a full-round action. A character can also perform as many free actions as the Overseer allows. In some situations (such as in the surprise round) a character may be limited to taking only a single attack or move action.

Attack Action

An attack action allows a character to do something. A character can make an attack, use a skill or a feat (unless the skill or feat requires a full-round action to perform; see below), or perform other similar actions. During a combat round, a character can take an attack action and a move action. A character can take a move action before or after performing an attack action.

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198 Combat and Tactics Move Action A move action allows a character to move his speed or perform an action that takes a similar amount of time. A character can move his speed, climb one-quarter of his speed, draw or stow a weapon or other object, stand up, pick up an object, or perform some equivalent action (see the Actions in Combat table below). A character can take a move action in the place of an attack action. If a character moves no actual distance in a round, that character can take one 5-foot step before, during, or after the action.

Full-Round Action

A full-round action consumes all a character’s effort during a round. The only movement the character can take during a full-round action is a 5-foot step before, during, or after the action. Some full-round actions do not allow a character to take a 5-foot step. A character can also perform free actions (see below) as the Overseer allows.

Free Action Free actions consume a very small amount of time and effort, and over the span of the round, their impact is so minor that they are considered free. A character can perform one or more free actions while taking another action normally. The Overseer, however, puts reasonable limits on what a character can really do for free. For instance, dropping an object, dropping to a prone position, speaking a sentence or two, and ceasing to concentrate on a magic spell (if magic is available in the campaign) are all free actions.

Attack Actions Most common attack actions are described below. More specialized attack actions are mentioned in the Actions in Combat table, and covered in Special Attacks.

Melee Attacks With a normal melee weapon, a character can strike any enemy within 5 feet. (Enemies within 5 feet are considered adjacent to the character.) A character capable of making more than one melee attack per round must use the full attack action (see Full-Round Actions, below) in order to make more than one attack.

Fighting Defensively

A character can choose to fight defensively while making a melee attack. If the character does so, he takes a –4 penalty on his attack in a round to gain a +2 dodge bonus to Defense in the same round.

Unarmed Attacks Striking for damage with punches, kicks, and head butts is much like attacking with a melee weapon, except that an unarmed attack deals non-lethal damage. Unarmed strikes count as light melee weapons (for purposes of two-weapon attack penalties and so on). The following exceptions to normal melee rules apply to unarmed attacks.

Attacks of Opportunity Making an unarmed attack against an armed opponent provokes an attack of opportunity from the character attacked. The attack of opportunity comes before the character’s attack. An unarmed attack does not provoke attacks of opportunity from other foes, nor does it provoke an attack of opportunity from an unarmed foe.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 “Armed” Unarmed Attacks Sometimes a character or creature attacks unarmed but the attack still counts as armed. A creature with claws, fangs, and similar natural physical weapons, for example, counts as armed. Being armed counts for both offense and defense—not only does a creature not provoke an attack of opportunity when attacking an armed foe, but a character provokes an attack of opportunity from that creature if the character makes an unarmed attack against it. The Combat Martial Arts feat makes a character’s unarmed attacks count as armed.

Unarmed Strike Damage An unarmed strike from a Medium-size character deals 1d3 points (plus the character’s Strength modifier, as normal) of non-lethal damage. A character can specify that his unarmed strike will deal lethal damage before the character makes his attack roll, but the character takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll because he has to strike a particularly vulnerable spot to deal lethal damage.

Actions in Combat Attack Actions

Attack of Opportunity1

Move Actions

Attack of Opportunity1

Full-Round Actions

Attack of Opportunity1

Free Actions

Attack of Opportunity1

Attack (melee)

No

Move your speed

Yes

Bull rush (charge)

No

Drop an object

No

Attack (ranged)

Yes

Use a piece equipment

No

Charge

No

Drop to prone, sitting, or kneeling

No

Attack (unarmed)

Yes

Climb (one-quarter speed)

No

Coup de grace

Yes

Speak

No

Attack (aid another)

No

Climb, accelerated (one-half speed)

No

Full attack

No Action Type Varies

Attack of Opportunity1

of

Bull rush (attack)

No

Crawl

No

Overrun (charge)

No

Disarm4

Yes

Escape a grapple

No

Draw a weapon3

No

Run

Yes

Grapple4

Yes

Feint (see the Bluff skill)

No

Holster a weapon

Yes

Withdraw

No

Load a weapon

Yes

Ready (triggers attack action)

No

Move object

Yes

Extinguish flames

No

Trip an opponent4

No (Yes unarmed)

Make a dying character stable

Yes

Open a door

No

Use a skill that takes a full round

Usually

Use a feat5

Varies

Attack a weapon

Yes

Pick up an object

Yes

Reload a firearm with an internal magazine

Yes No Action

Attack of Opportunity1

an

a

heavy

Attack an object

Maybe2

Reload a firearm with a box magazine or speed loader

Yes

Delay

No

Total defense

No

Retrieve a stored object

Yes

5-foot step

No

Use a skill that takes an attack action

Usually

Stand up from prone, sitting, or kneeling

Yes

Start/complete round action

Varies

Swim

No

Use a skill that takes a move action

Usually

full-

if

Regardless of the action, if a character moves out of a threatened square, the character usually provokes an attack of opportunity. This column indicates whether the action itself, not moving, provokes an attack of opportunity. 2 If the object is being held, carried, or worn by a creature, yes. If not, no. 3 If the character has a base attack bonus of +1 or higher, he can combine this action with a regular move. If the character has the Two-Weapon Fighting feat, he can draw two light or one-handed weapons in the time it would normally take to draw one. 4 These attack forms substitute for a melee attack, not an action. As melee attacks, they can be used once in an attack or charge action, one or more times in a full attack action, or even as an attack of opportunity. 5 The Description of a feat defines its effect. 1

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Ranged Attacks With a ranged weapon, a character can shoot or throw at any target that is within the ranged weapon’s maximum range and in line of sight. A target is in line of sight if there are no solid obstructions between the character and the target. The maximum range for a thrown weapon is five range increments. For weapons that fire projectiles, it is ten range increments. A character capable of making more than one ranged attack per round must use the full attack action (see Full-Round Actions, below) in order to make more than one attack.

Shooting or Throwing into a Melee If a character shoots or throws a ranged weapon at a target that is engaged in melee with an ally, the character takes a –4 penalty on his attack roll because the character has to aim carefully to avoid hitting the ally. Two characters are engaged in melee if they are enemies and they are adjacent to one another. (An unconscious or otherwise immobilized character is not considered engaged unless he is actually being attacked.) If the target is so big that part of it is 10 feet or farther from the nearest ally, the character can avoid the –4 penalty, even if it is engaged in melee with an ally. Due to the weapon’s unwieldy shape and size, an attacker using a an attacker using a firearm bigger than a handgun takes a --4 penalty on attacks against adjacent opponents.

Fighting Defensively A character can choose to fight defensively while making a ranged attack. If the character does so, he takes a –4 penalty on his attack in a round to gain a +2 dodge bonus to Defense in the same round.

Total Defense Instead of attacking, a character can use his attack action simply to defend. This is called a total defense action. The character does not get to attack or perform any other activity, but does get a +4 dodge bonus to his Defense for 1 round. The character’s Defense improves at the start of this action, so it helps against any attacks of opportunity the character is subject to while performing his move action.

Start/Complete Full-Round Action The “start/complete full-round action” attack action lets a character start undertaking a fullround action (such as those listed on the Actions in Combat table) at the end of his turn, or complete a full-round action by using an attack action at the beginning of his turn in the round following the round when the character started the full-round action. If the character starts a full-round action at the end of his turn, the next action that character takes must be to complete the full-round action. Start/complete full-round action cannot be used with a full attack, charge, run, or withdraw action.

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Move Actions With the exception of specific movement-related skills, most move actions do not require a check. In some cases, ability checks might be required.

Movement

The simplest move action is moving the character’s speed. If a character takes this kind of move action during his turn, the character cannot also take a 5-foot step. any nonstandard modes of movement are also covered under this category, including climbing and swimming (up to one-quarter the character’s speed), crawling (up to 5 feet), and entering a vehicle.

Manipulating Objects In most cases, moving or manipulating an object is a move action. This includes drawing or holstering a weapon, retrieving or putting away a stored object, picking up an object, moving a heavy object, and opening a door. If the character has a base attack bonus of +1 or higher, he can draw a weapon as part of his normal movement (a 5-foot step does not count as movement for this purpose).

Standing Up Standing up from a prone position requires a move action. It provokes an attack of opportunity from opponents who threaten the character.

Full-Round Actions A full-round action requires an entire round to complete. If it does not involve moving any distance, a character can combine it with a 5-foot step.

Charge Charging is a special full-round action that allows a character to move more than his speed and attack during the action. There are tight restrictions, however, on how and when a character can charge.

Movement during a Charge

The character must move before his attack, not after. The character must move at least 10 feet and may move up to twice his speed. All movement must be in a straight line, with no backing up allowed. The character must stop as soon as he is within striking range of his target (the character cannot run past the target and attack from another direction). A character cannot take a 5-foot step during the same round as a full charge. During the surprise round (or any other time a character is limited to taking no more than a single attack action on his turn) the character can still use the charge action, but he is only allowed to move up to his speed (instead of up to twice his speed).

Attacking after a Charge

After moving, the character may make a single melee attack. The character gets a +2 bonus on the attack roll. The character also takes a –2 penalty to his Defense for 1 round (until the beginning of the character’s turn in the following round). Even if the character has extra attacks, such as from having a high enough base attack bonus or from using multiple weapons, a character only gets to make one attack after a charge. Instead of attacking the target, a character can attempt to push the target back. See Bull Rush.

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202 Combat and Tactics Full Attack If a character gets more than one attack per action because his base attack bonus is high enough; because he fights with two weapons; because he is using a double weapon; or for some special reason, the character must use the full attack action to get his additional attacks. The character does not need to specify the targets of his attacks ahead of time. The character can see how the earlier attacks turn out before assigning the later ones. Full attack is a full-round action; because of this, the only movement a character may take during a full attack is a 5-foot step. The character may take the step before, after, or between the attacks. If a character gets multiple attacks based on his base attack bonus, the character must make the attacks in order from highest bonus to lowest. If the character is using two weapons, the character can strike with either weapon first. If the character is using a double weapon, the character can strike with either part of the weapon first.

Committing to a Full Attack Action

A character does not have to commit to a full attack until after the first attack. The character can then decide whether to make his remaining attacks or to take a move action. Of course, if the character has already taken a 5-foot step, he cannot use his move action to move any distance, but the character could still draw or put away a weapon, for instance (see Move Actions, above).

Fighting Defensively

A character can choose to fight defensively when taking a full attack action. If the character does so, he takes a –4 penalty on all attacks in a round to gain a +2 dodge bonus to Defense in the same round.

Attacking with Two Weapons If the character wields a second weapon in his off hand, the character can get one extra attack per round with that weapon. Fighting in this way is very difficult, however—the character takes a –6 penalty on the regular attack or attacks with his primary hand and a –10 penalty on the attack with his off hand. A character can reduce these penalties in two ways: 1. If the off-hand weapon is light, the penalties are reduced by 2 each. (An unarmed strike is always considered light.) 2. The Two-Weapon Fighting feat lessens the primary hand penalty by 2, and the off-hand penalty by 6. The Two-Weapon Fighting Penalties table summarizes the interaction of all these factors. Double Weapons: A character can use a double weapon to make an extra attack as if he were fighting with two weapons. The penalties apply as if the off-hand weapon were light.

Two-Weapon Fighting Penalties Circ*mstances Primary Hand Normal penalties –6 Off-hand weapon is light –4 Two-Weapon Fighting feat –4 Off-hand weapon is light and –2 Two-Weapon Fighting feat

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Run A character can run all out as a full-round action. When a character runs, he can move up to four times his speed in a straight line. (The character does not get a 5-foot step.) The character loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense since he cannot avoid attacks. The character gets a +2 bonus to Defense, however, against ranged attacks while running. A character can run for a number of rounds equal to his Constitution score, but after that the character must succeed at a Constitution check (DC 10) to continue running. The character must check again each round in which he continues to run, and the DC of this check increases by 1 for each check the character makes. When the character fails this check, he must stop running. A character that has run to his limit must rest for 1 minute (10 rounds) before running again. During a rest period, a character can move normally, but cannot run. A run represents a speed of about 14 miles per hour for an unencumbered human.

Withdraw Withdrawing from melee combat is a full-round action. When a character withdraws, he can move up to twice his speed. (The character does not also get a 5-foot step.) The square the character starts from is not considered threatened for purposes of withdrawing, and therefore enemies do not get attacks of opportunity against the character when he moves from that square. If, while withdrawing, the character moves through another threatened square (other than the one started in) without stopping, enemies get attacks of opportunity as normal. Some forms of movement (such as climbing and swimming) require skill checks from most creatures. A character may not withdraw using a form of movement for which that character must make a skill check.

Miscellaneous Actions Some actions do not fit neatly into the above categories. Some of the options described below are actions that take the place of or are variations on the actions described earlier. For actions not covered in any of this material, the Overseer determines how long such an action takes to perform and whether doing so provokes attacks of opportunity from threatening enemies.

Feat, Skill, or Talent Use Certain feats let a character take special actions in combat. Other feats are not actions in themselves, but they do give a character a bonus when attempting something he can already do. Some feats are not meant to be used within the framework of combat. The individual feat Descriptions tell a character what he needs to know about them. Most uses of skills or talents in a combat situation are attack actions, but some might be move actions or full-round actions. When appropriate, the Description of a talent or a skill provides the time required to use it.

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Attacks of Opportunity The melee combat rules assume that combatants are actively avoiding attacks. A player does not have to declare anything special for his character to be on the defensive. Sometimes, however, a combatant in a melee lets his guard down, and does not maintain a defensive posture as usual. In this case, combatants near him can take advantage of this lapse in defense to attack for free. These attacks are called attacks of opportunity.

Weapon Type

A character can use a melee weapon to make attacks of opportunity whenever the conditions for such an attack are met (see Provoking an Attack of Opportunity, below). In addition, a character may make attacks of opportunity with unarmed attacks if the character’s unarmed attacks count as armed (see “Armed” Unarmed Attacks).

Threatened Squares

A character threatens the squares into which he can make a melee attack, even when it is not the character’s action. Generally, that is all squares adjacent to the character’s position. An enemy that takes certain actions while in a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity from the character. A character can only make attacks of opportunity with melee weapons, never with ranged weapons.

Provoking an Attack of Opportunity Two actions can provoke attacks of opportunity: moving out of a threatened square, and performing an action within a threatened square that distracts from defending and lets the character’s guard down.

Moving out of a Threatened Square

When a character moves out of a threatened square, that character generally provokes an attack of opportunity. There are two important exceptions, however. A character does not provoke an attack of opportunity if all he moves is a 5-foot step, or if the character withdraws. If the character does not start in a threatened square, but moves into one, the character has to stop there, or else he provokes an attack of opportunity as he leaves that square.

Performing an Action that Distracts the Character

Some actions, when performed in a threatened square, provoke attacks of opportunity because they make a character divert his attention from the fight at hand. Using a ranged weapon, in particular, provokes attacks of opportunity. The Actions in Combat table notes many additional actions that provoke attacks of opportunity.

Making an Attack of Opportunity

An attack of opportunity is a single melee attack, and a character can only make one per round. A character does not have to make an attack of opportunity if he does not want to. An experienced character gets additional regular melee attacks (by using the full attack action), but at a lower attack bonus. A character makes his attack of opportunity, however, at his normal attack bonus— even if the character has already attacked in this round.

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Movement and Position When using a grid to represent character’s movement, the standard scale equates 1 inch (or a 1 inch square) to 5 feet in the game world. Standard Scale One inch (or one square) = 5 feet “Next to” or “adjacent” = 1 inch (5 feet) away (or in adjacent square) 30mm figure = A human-size creature A human-size creature occupies an area 1 inch (5 feet) across (or one square) One round = 6 seconds

Tactical Movement

Where can a character move, how long it takes to get there, and whether he is vulnerable to attacks of opportunity while moving are key questions in combat.

How Far Can a Character Move? Humans normally move 30 feet, although armor can slow a character down. Some creatures move faster or slower. A character’s speed when unarmored is sometimes called base speed.

Encumbrance A character encumbered by carrying a large amount of gear or a fallen comrade may move slower than normal.

Movement in Combat Generally, a character can move his speed as a move action. If a character uses his attack action as a move action, the character can move again (for a total movement of up to twice the character’s normal speed). If the character spends the entire round to run all out, he can move up to four times his normal speed. If a character does something that requires a full round, he can only take a 5-foot step.

Movement in Darkness If a character moves when he cannot see, such as in total darkness, his speed is limited to one-half normal. The Blind-Fight feat reduces this penalty.

Passing Through Sometimes a character can pass through an area occupied by another character or creature.

Friendly Character A character can move through a square occupied by a friendly character.

Unfriendly Character There are two ways to move through a square occupied by a resisting enemy: The character can attempt an overrun; or, the character can attempt to tumble through a square occupied by an enemy (if the character has ranks in the Tumble skill; see the skill Description). A character can move through a square occupied by an unfriendly character that does not resist as if the character was friendly.

Square Occupied by a Creature Three Sizes Larger or Smaller Any creature can move through a square occupied by a creature three size categories larger or three categories smaller than it is.

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Flanking If a character is making a melee attack against an opponent, and an ally directly opposite the character is threatening the opponent, the character and his ally flank the opponent. The character gains a +2 bonus on his attack roll. The ally must be on the other side of the opponent so that the opponent is directly between the character and the ally. A character does not gain a bonus for flanking when making a ranged attack.

Combat Modifiers This section covers offensive and defensive modifiers provided by position.

Favorable and Unfavorable Conditions Generally speaking, any situational modifier created by the attacker’s position or tactics applies to the attack roll, while any situational modifier created by the defender’s position, state, or tactics applies to the defender’s Defense. The Overseer judges what bonuses and penalties apply, using the Defense Modifiers and Attack Roll Modifiers as guides.

Cover Cover provides a bonus to Defense. The more cover a character has, the bigger the bonus. In a melee, if a character has cover against an opponent, that opponent probably has cover against the character, too. With ranged weapons, however, it is easy to have better cover than the opponent. Defense Modifiers Circ*mstance Defender sitting or kneeling Defender prone Defender stunned or cowering Defender climbing Defender flat-footed Defender running Defender grappling (attacker not) Defender pinned Defender helpless (such as paralyzed, sleeping, or bound) Defender has cover Defender concealed or invisible

Melee –2 –4 –22 –22 +02 +02 +02

Ranged +21 +41 –22 –22 +02 +22 +03

–44 +02

+04 +02

See Cover See Concealment

1 Does not apply if target is adjacent to attacker. This circ*mstance may

instead improve bonus to Defense granted by cover. See Cover, below. 2 The defender loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense. 3 Roll randomly to see which grappling combatant the character strikes.

That defender loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense. 4 Treat the defender’s Dexterity as 0 (–5 modifier).

Attack Roll Modifiers Circ*mstance Attacker flanking defender1 Attacker on higher ground Attacker prone Attacker invisible

Melee +2 +1 –4 +23

Ranged — +0 –2 +23

1 A character flanks a defender when he has an ally on the opposite side

of the defender threatening the defender. 2 Some ranged weapons can’t be used while the attacker is prone.

The Overseer may impose other penalties or restrictions on attacks depending on the details of the cover.

Degree of Cover

Cover is assessed in subjective measurements of how much protection it offers. The Overseer determines the value of cover. This measure is not a strict mathematical calculation, because a character gains more value from covering the parts of his body that are more likely to be struck. If the bottom half of a character’s body is covered, that only gives one-quarter cover, because most vital areas are still fully exposed. If one side or the other of a character’s body is covered, the character gets one-half cover.

Cover Defense Bonus Cover gives the Defense bonuses for different degrees of cover as denoted on the table below. Add the relevant number to the character’s Defense. This cover bonus overlaps (does not stack) with certain other bonuses.

Cover Reflex Save Bonus Cover gives the Reflex save bonuses for different degrees of cover as denoted on the table below. Add this bonus to Reflex saves against attacks that affect an area. This bonus only applies to attacks that originate or burst out from a point on the other side of the cover.

3 The defender loses any Dexterity bonus to Defense.

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Striking the Cover Instead of a Missed Target

Cover Degree of Cover (Example)

Cover Bonus to Defense +2

Reflex Saves

One-quarter (standing behind a +1 3-ft. high wall) One-half (fighting from around a +4 +2 corner or a tree; standing at an open window; behind a creature of same size) Three-quarters (peering around +7 +3 a corner or a big tree) Nine-tenths (standing at an +10 +4 1 arrow slit; behind a door that’s slightly ajar) Total (on the other side of a — — solid wall) 1 Half damage if save is failed; no damage if successful.

If it ever becomes important to know whether the cover was actually struck by an incoming attack that misses the intended target, the Overseer should determine if the attack roll would have hit the protected target without the cover. If the attack roll falls within a range low enough to miss the target with cover, but high enough to strike the target if there had been no cover, the object used for cover was struck. This can be particularly important to know in cases when a character uses another character as cover. In such a case, if the cover is struck, and the attack roll exceeds the Defense of the covering character, the covering character takes the damage intended for the target. This is called Friendly Fire.

If the covering character has a Dexterity bonus to Defense or a dodge bonus, and this bonus keeps the covering character from being hit, then the original target is hit instead. The covering character has dodged out of the way and did not provide cover after all. A covering character can choose not to apply his Dexterity bonus to Defense and/or his dodge bonus, if the character so desires.

Auto-Fire Attacks into Cover When cover is hit (attack roll (DC 10 + cover bonus listed below)), an auto-fire attack is then split between the cover and the targeted area. Friendly Fire Degree of Cover One-quarter (Dwarf) One-half (medium-size creature) Three-quarters (second medium-sized creature) Nine-tenths (third mediumsized creature)

Cover Bonus +2 +4

Auto-Fire Reflex DC 15 13

+7

12

+10

11

Normally Auto-Fire is a 10ft by 10ft square area, unless the shooter has the Strafe Feat, in which case the area is 20ft length by 5ft wide. Cover that is hit reduces the auto-fire area by a number of 5ft squares that the cover blocks. In the 10ft by 10ft square area, 2 adjacent squares will be blocked by the cover and not targeted. The 20ft by 5ft area only one 5ft squares will be blocked by the cover

and not targeted. Should an auto-fire attack hit a targeted area with a cover bonus, characters in the cover area receive a lower DC to avoid the attack as denoted on the adjacent chart.

Burst Fire Attacks into Cover

If a burst fire attack is used it hits the cover like auto-fire (attack roll = DC 10 + cover bonus listed), then the target takes the burst damage.

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Concealment Concealment includes all circ*mstances in which nothing physically blocks a blow or shot, but something interferes with an attacker’s accuracy.

Degree of Concealment Concealment is subjectively measured as to how well concealed the defender is. Examples of what might qualify as concealment of various degrees are given on the Concealment table. Concealment always depends on the point of view of the attacker.

Concealment Miss Chance

Concealment Concealment (Example) One-quarter (light fog; light foliage) One-half (shadows; dense fog at 5 ft.) Three-quarters (dense foliage) Nine-tenths (near total darkness) Total (attacker blind; total darkness; smoke grenade; dense fog at 10 ft.) 1

Miss Chance 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%

Concealment gives the subject of a successful attack a chance that the attacker missed because of the 1 must guess target’s location concealment. If the attacker hits, the defender must make a miss chance percentile roll to avoid being struck. (Actually, it does not matter who makes the roll or whether it is rolled before or after the attack roll.) When multiple concealment conditions apply to a defender, use the one that would produce the highest miss chance. Do not add the miss chances together.

Helpless Defenders A helpless foe— one who is bound, sleeping, unconscious, or otherwise at the attacker’s mercy —is an easy target. A character can sometimes approach a target who is unaware of his presence, get adjacent to the target, and treat him as helpless. If the target is in combat or some other tense situation, and therefore in a state of acute awareness and readiness, or if the target can use his Dexterity bonus to Defense, then that target cannot be considered unaware. Further, any reasonable precaution taken by a target, including stationing bodyguards, placing his back to a wall, or being able to make Spot checks, also precludes catching that target unaware and helpless.

Regular Attack A helpless defender has an effective Defense of 5 + his size modifier. If a character is attacking with a ranged weapon and is not adjacent to the target, the character can use a full-round action to make the attack, and gain a +5 bonus on the attack roll. If the character is attacking with a melee weapon, or with a ranged weapon from an adjacent square, the character can use a full-round action to deliver a coup de grace.

Coup de Grace As a full-round action, a character can use a melee weapon to deliver a coup de grace to a helpless foe. A character can also use a ranged weapon, provided the character is adjacent to the target. The character automatically hits and scores a critical hit. If the defender survives the damage, he still must make a Fortitude save (DC 10 + damage dealt) or die. Delivering a coup de grace provokes attacks of opportunity from threatening foes because it involves focused concentration and methodical action. A character cannot deliver a coup de grace against a creature that is immune to critical hits.

Knockout Blow As a full-round action, a character can make an unarmed attack or use a melee weapon that deals non-lethal damage to deliver a knockout blow to a helpless foe. A character can also use a melee weapon that deals lethal damage, but the character takes a –4 penalty on any attempt to deal non-lethal damage with the weapon. The target has an effective Defense of 5 + his size modifier. If the character hits, he automatically scores a critical hit (see Non-lethal Damage).

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Delivering a knockout blow provokes attacks of opportunity from threatening foes because it involves focused concentration and methodical action. A character cannot deliver a knockout blow against a creature that is immune to critical hits.

Special Initiative Actions Usually a character acts as soon as he can in combat, but sometimes a character wants to act later, at a better time, or in response to the actions of someone else.

Delay By choosing to delay, the character takes no action and then acts normally at whatever point in the initiative count the character decides to act. When a character delays he voluntarily reduces his own initiative result for the rest of the combat. When the character’s new, lower, initiative count comes up later in the same round, the character can act normally. The character can specify this new initiative result or just wait until sometime later in the round and act then, thus fixing the character’s new initiative count at that point. A character cannot interrupt anyone’s action with a delayed action (as a character can with a readied action; see below).

Delaying Limits

The longest a character can delay before taking an action is until after everyone else has acted in the round. At that point, the delaying character must act or else forfeit any action in that round. If multiple characters are delaying, the one with the highest initiative modifier (or highest Dexterity, in case of a tie) has the advantage. If two or more delaying characters both want to act on the same initiative count, the one with the highest initiative modifier gets to go first. If two or more delaying characters are trying to go after one another, the one with the highest initiative modifier gets to go last; the others must go first or lose their action for the round. If a character loses an action due to delaying, he may act on any count on the next turn. Again, the character cannot interrupt an action.

Ready The ready action lets a character prepare to take an action later, to interrupt another character. Essentially, the character splits his action, taking the move action on the character’s initiative count and the attack action at a later point. On the character’s turn, he prepares to take an action later, if a specific trigger is met. Then, later in the round, if the readied action is triggered, the character takes it, acting before the triggering action. Readying does not provoke an attack of opportunity. (The character’s move action, and the attack action he readies, may both provoke attacks of opportunity normally.)

Readying an Action

A character can ready an attack action or a move action. To do so, the character specifies the action he will take and the conditions under which the character will take it. Then, any time before the character’s next action, the character may take the readied attack action in response to those conditions. The readied action occurs just before the event that triggers it. If the trigger is part of another character’s actions, the readied action interrupts the other character. The other character continues his actions once the readied action is completed. The character’s initiative count changes—for the rest of the encounter, it is the count on which the character took the readied action, and the character acts immediately ahead of the character whose action triggered the readied action.

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210 Combat and Tactics A character can take a 5-foot step as part of his readied action, but only if the character did not otherwise move any distance during the round. If the character comes to his next action and has not yet performed the readied action, the character does not get to take the readied action (though the character can ready the same action again). If the character takes his readied action in the next round, before his regular turn comes up, the character’s initiative count rises to that new point in the order of battle, and he does not get the regular action for that round.

Special Attacks This section covers firearms, grappling, explosives, attacking objects, and an assortment of other special attacks.

Aid Another In combat, a character can help a friend attack or defend by distracting or interfering with an opponent. If the character is in position to attack an opponent with which a friend of the character is engaged in melee combat, the character can attempt to aid the friend as an attack action. The character makes an attack roll against Defense 10. If the character succeeds, he does not actually damage the opponent—but the character’s friend gains either a +2 circ*mstance bonus against that opponent or a +2 circ*mstance bonus to Defense against that opponent (aiding character’s choice) on the friend’s next turn.

Firearms The most basic form of attack with a firearm is a single shot. One attack is one pull of the trigger and fires one bullet at one target. The Personal Firearms Proficiency feat allows a character to make this sort of attack without penalty. If a character is not proficient in personal firearms, he takes a –4 penalty on attacks with that type of weapon. A number of other feats allow a character to deal extra damage when he fires more than one bullet as part of a single attack at a single target. (If a character does not have those feats, he can still fire more than one bullet—but the extra bullets do not have any effect, and are just wasted ammunition.) As with all forms of ranged weapons, attacking with a firearm while within a threatened square provokes an attack of opportunity. Due to the weapon’s unwieldy shape and size, an attacker using a firearm bigger than a handgun takes a –4 penalty on attacks against adjacent opponents.

Auto-fire If a ranged weapon has an automatic rate of fire, a character may set it on auto-fire. Auto-fire affects an area and everyone in it, not a specific creature. The character targets a 10-foot-by-10-foot area and makes an attack roll; the targeted area has an effective Defense of 10. (If the character does not have the Advanced Firearms Proficiency feat, he takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll.) If the attack succeeds, every creature within the affected area must make a Reflex save (DC 15) or take the weapon’s damage. Auto-fire shoots 10 bullets, and can only be used if the weapon has 10 bullets in it. Auto-fire is not the same thing as burst fire, which involves firing a short burst at a specific target. Firing a burst requires the Burst Fire feat. If a character fires a blast of automatic fire at a specific target without the Burst Fire feat, it is treated as a standard attack. The attack, if successful, only deals normal damage—all the extra ammunition the character fired is wasted. Some firearms, particularly machine guns, only have auto-fire settings and cannot normally fire single shots.

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Grenades and Explosives An explosive is a weapon that, when detonated, affects all creatures and objects within its burst radius by means of shrapnel, heat, or massive concussion. Its effect is broad enough that it can hurt characters just by going off close to them. Some explosives, such as grenades, can be thrown, and they explode when they land. Others are planted, with fuses or timers, and go off after a preset amount of time elapses.

Thrown Explosives (Hit)

Thrown Explosives

An attack with a thrown explosive is a ranged attack made against a specific 5-foot square. (A character can target a square occupied by a creature.) Throwing the explosive is an attack action. If the square is within one range increment, you do not need to make an attack roll. Roll 1d4 and consult the Hit table to see which corner of the square Thrown Explosive (Miss 2 to 3 Range Increments) the explosive bounces to. Roll on d4 1 2 3 4 d8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Corner of targeted square Upper Left Upper Right Lower Right Lower Left

Location Struck upper right corner, one square beyond target upper right corner, one square right of target lower right corner, one square right of target lower right corner, one square short of target lower left corner, one square short of target lower left corner, one square left of target upper left corner, one square left of target upper left corner, one square beyond target

Thrown Explosives (Miss 4 to5 Range Increments) d12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Location Struck upper right corner, two squares beyond target upper right corner, one square beyond and right of target upper right corner, two squares right of target lower right corner, two squares right of target lower right corner, one square short and right of target lower right corner, two squares short of target lower left corner, two squares short of target lower left corner, one square short and left of target lower left corner, two squares left of target upper left corner, two squares left of target upper left corner, one square beyond and left of target upper left corner, two squares beyond target

If the target square is more than one range increment away, make an attack roll. The square has an effective Defense of 10. Thrown weapons require no weapon proficiency, so a character does not take the – 4 non-proficient penalty. If the attack succeeds, the grenade or explosive, lands in the targeted square. Roll 1d4 and consult the Hit table to see into which corner of the square the explosive bounces. If the character misses the target, the explosive lands at a corner of a square nearby in a random direction. Consult the Miss tables to determine where the explosive lands. If the weapon was thrown two to three range increments (11 to 30 feet), roll 1d8. For ranges of up to five range increments (31 to 50 feet), roll 1d12. After determining where the explosive landed, it deals its damage to all targets within the burst radius of the weapon. The targets may make Reflex saves (DC varies according to the explosive type) for half damage.

Planted Explosives

A planted explosive is set in place, with a timer or fuse determining when it goes off. No attack roll is necessary to plant an explosive; the explosive sits where it is placed until it is moved or goes off. When a planted explosive detonates, it deals its damage to all targets within the burst radius of the weapon. The targets may make Reflex saves (DC varies according to the explosive type) for half damage.

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212 Combat and Tactics Splash Weapons A splash weapon is a ranged weapon that breaks apart on impact, splashing or scattering its contents over its target and nearby creatures or objects. Most splash weapons consist of liquids in breakable containers. To attack with a splash weapon, make a ranged touch attack against the target. Thrown weapons require no weapon proficiency, so characters do not take the –4 non-proficient penalty. A hit deals direct hit damage to the target and splash damage to all other creatures within 5 feet of the target. A character can instead target a specific 5-foot square, including a square occupied by a creature. Use the rules for thrown explosives. If a character targets a square, however, creatures within 5 feet are dealt the splash damage, and the direct hit damage is not dealt to any creature. If the character misses the target (whether aiming at a creature or a square), check to see where the weapon lands, using the rules for thrown explosives. After determining where the object landed, it deals splash damage to all creatures within 5 feet.

Attack an Object Sometimes a character needs to attack or break an object.

Strike an Object Objects are easier to hit than characters because they usually do not move, but many are tough enough to shrug off some damage from each blow.

Object Defense and Bonuses to Attack

Objects are harder or easier to hit depending on their size and whether they are immobile or being held, carried, or worn by opponents. The base Defense of objects is shown on the Size and Defense of Objects table below. If a character uses a full-round action to make an attack against an inanimate, immobile object, the character gets an automatic hit with a melee weapon or a +5 bonus on his attack roll with a ranged weapon.

Size and Defense of Objects Size (Example) Colossal (oil rig) Gargantuan (gutted tank) Huge (large ruined vehicle) Large (big door) Medium-size (desk) Small (chair) Tiny (Snap-Off Super Toolkit) Diminutive (Cat’s Paw magazine) Fine (Rad-Blocker 2 pill)

Defense –3 1 3 4 5 6 7 9 13

An object being held, carried, or worn has a Defense equal to the above figure + 5 + the opponent’s Dexterity modifier + the opponent’s class bonus to Defense. Striking a held, carried, or worn object provokes an attack of opportunity Substance Hardness and Hit Points from the character who holds it. (If a character Substance Hardness Hit Points has the Sunder feat, he does not incur an attack of Paper 0 2/inch of thickness opportunity for making the attempt.) Rope 0 2/inch of thickness

Hardness

Each object has hardness—a number that represents how well it resists damage. Whenever an object takes damage, subtract its hardness from the damage. Only damage in excess of its hardness is deducted from the object’s hit points (see the Substance Hardness and Hit Points and the Object Hardness and Hit Points tables below).

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Plastic, soft Glass Ceramic Ice Plastic, hard Wood Aluminum Concrete Steel

0 1 1 0 2 5 6 8 10

3/inch of thickness 1/inch of thickness 2/inch of thickness 3/inch of thickness 5/inch of thickness 10/inch of thickness 10/inch of thickness 15/inch of thickness 30/inch of thickness

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Object Hardness and Hit Points Object Lock Cheap Average High quality High security Ultrahigh security Manufactured objects1 Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Medium-size Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal Firearm, Medium-size Rope Simple wooden door Strong wooden door Steel door Cinderblock wall Chain Handcuffs Metal bars

Hardness

Hit Points

Break DC

0 3 5 10 20

1 5 10 120 150

10 15 20 35 40

0 0 1 3 5 5 8 8 10 5 0 5 5 10 8 10 10 10

1 1 2 3 5 10 10 20 30 7 2 10 20 120 90 5 10 15

10 10 10 12 15 15 20 30 50 17 23 13 23 35 35 26 30 30

1 Figures for manufactured objects are minimum values. The Overseer may adjust these

upward to account for objects with more strength and durability.

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Hit Points

An object’s hit point total depends on what it is made of or how big it is (see the Substance Hardness and Hit Points and the Object Hardness and Hit Points tables below).

Energy Attacks

Acid and sonic/concussive attacks deal normal damage to most objects. Electricity and fire attacks deal half damage to most objects; divide the damage by 2 before applying the hardness. Cold attacks deal onequarter damage to most objects; divide the damage by 4 before applying the hardness.

Ineffective Weapons

The Overseer may determine that certain weapons just cannot deal damage effectively to certain objects.

Immunities Objects are immune to non-lethal damage and to critical hits.

Saving Throws

Unattended objects never make saving throws. They are considered to have failed their saving throws. An object attended by a character (being grasped, touched, or worn) receives a saving throw just as if the character herself were making the saving throw.

Breaking Objects When a character tries to break something with sudden force rather than by dealing damage, use a Strength check to see whether he succeeds. The DC depends more on the construction of the object than on the material. If an object has lost half or more of its hit points, the DC to break it decreases by 2.

Repairing Objects

Repairing damage to an object takes a full hour of work and appropriate tools. (Without the tools, a character takes a –4 penalty on his Repair check.) At the end of the hour, make a Repair check (DC 20). Success restores 2d6 hit points. If damage remains, the character may continue to make repairs for as many hours as it takes to restore all the object’s hit points.

Bull Rush A character can attempt a bull rush as an attack action made during his move action, or as part of a charge. (In general, a character cannot make an attack action during a move action; this is an exception). In either case, the character does not get a 5-foot step before, during, or after the bull rush attempt. When the character bull rushes, he attempts to push an opponent straight back instead of attacking the opponent. A character can only bull rush an opponent who is one size category larger than the character, the same size, or smaller.

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214 Combat and Tactics Initiating a Bull Rush First, the character moves into the target’s square. Moving in this way provokes an attack of opportunity from each foe that threatens the character, probably including the target. Second, the character and the target make opposed Strength checks. If the character and the target are different sizes, the larger combatant gets a bonus on the Strength check of +4 per difference in size category. The character gets a +2 bonus if he was charging. The target gets a +4 stability bonus if he has more than two legs or is otherwise exceptionally stable.

Bull Rush Results

If the character beats the target’s Strength check, the character pushes the opponent back 5 feet. The character can push the target back an additional 5 feet for every 5 points by which the character exceeded the target’s check result, provided the character moves with the target. A character cannot, however, exceed his normal movement for that action. (The target provokes attacks of opportunity if moved. So does the character, if he moves with the target. The target and the character do not provoke attacks of opportunity from each other as a result of this movement.) If the character fails to beat the target’s Strength check, the character moves 5 feet straight back to where the character was before the character moved into the opponents square. If that square is occupied, the character falls prone in the square.

Disarm As a melee attack, a character may attempt to disarm his opponent. If the character does so with a weapon, he knocks the opponent’s weapon out of his hands and to the ground. If the character attempts the Disarm while unarmed, the character ends up with the weapon in his hand. If a character is attempting to disarm the wielder of a melee weapon, follow the steps outlined here. Disarming the wielder of a ranged weapon is slightly different; see below. Step One: The character provokes an attack of opportunity from the target he is trying to disarm. Step Two: The character and the target make opposed attack rolls with their respective weapons. If the weapons are different sizes, the combatant with the larger weapon gets a bonus on the attack roll of +4 per difference in size category. If the target is using a weapon in two hands, he gets an additional +4 bonus. Also, if the combatants are different sizes, the larger combatant gets a bonus on the attack roll of +4 per difference in size category. Step Three: If the character beats the target’s attack roll, the target is disarmed. If the character attempted the disarm action unarmed, he now has the weapon. If the character was armed, the target’s weapon is on the ground at the target’s feet. If the character fails the disarm attempt, the target may immediately react and attempt to disarm the character with the same sort of opposed melee attack roll. The opponent’s attempt does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the character. If the opponent fails to disarm, the character does not get a free disarm attempt against the opponent.

Ranged Weapons

To disarm an opponent wielding a ranged weapon, the character makes a melee attack or unarmed attack to strike the weapon in the opponent’s hand (see Attack an Object). If the weapon is held in two hands, it gets a +2 bonus to its Defense. If the character’s attack succeeds, the ranged weapon falls to the ground or winds up in the character’s hands (if the character made the attack unarmed). This kind of disarm attempt provokes an attack of opportunity, but if the character fails, the target does not get to make a disarm attempt against him.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Grabbing Objects

A character can also use disarm to snatch away an object worn by a target. Doing this works the same as a Disarm attempt (see above), except for the following: Attack of Opportunity: If the target’s attack of opportunity inflicts any damage, the attempt to grab the object automatically fails. Modifiers: If the object is well secured or otherwise difficult to grab from the target, the target gets a +4 bonus. On the other hand, if the object is poorly secured or otherwise easy to snatch or cut away, the attacker gets a +4 bonus. Failed Attempts: Failing an attempt to grab an object does not allow the target to attempt to disarm the character.

Grapple Grappling means wrestling and struggling hand-to-hand. There are three stages to grappling: grabbing, holding, and pinning.

Grabbing

Normally, a grab is just the first step to starting a grapple. If the character grabs an opponent, but fails to go on to hold him, the character does not actually start a grapple. Sometimes all a character wants to do is grab the target, however.

Holding Once a character has established a hold, he is involved in a grapple. From a hold, a character can attempt a number of actions, including damaging the opponent or pinning the opponent. A character cannot get a hold on any creature more than two size categories larger than the character. Such a creature can, however, get a hold on the character—so while a character cannot initiate a grapple with a creature more than two size categories larger than, a character can still end up in one.)

Pinning Getting the opponent in a pin is often the goal of a grapple. A pinned character is held immobile.

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216 Combat and Tactics Grapple Checks When a character is involved in a grapple, he will need to make opposed grapple checks against an opponent—often repeatedly. A grapple check is something like a melee attack roll. A character’s attack bonus on a grapple check is: Base attack bonus + Strength modifier + grapple modifier

Grapple Modifier

A creature’s size works in its favor when grappling, if that creature is Large or larger in size. Conversely, a creature of Small or smaller size is at a disadvantage because of its size when grappling. Instead of using a creature’s size modifier on a grapple check (as would be done for a melee or ranged attack roll), use the appropriate grapple modifier from the Grapple Modifiers table below.

Starting a Grapple

Grapple Modifiers Size (Example) Colossal (sea serpent) Gargantuan (desert serpent) Huge (elephant) Large (Trans-Gen Mutant) Medium-size (human) Small (dog) Tiny (pig rat) Diminutive (normal rat) Fine (blood fly)

Grapple Modifier +16 +12 +8 +4 +0 –4 –8 –12 –16

To start a grapple, a character first needs to grab and hold his target. Attempting to start a grapple is the equivalent of making a melee attack. If the character gets multiple attacks in a round, he can attempt to start a grapple multiple times (at successively lower base attack bonuses). Follow these steps:

1. Attack of Opportunity: A character provokes an attack of opportunity from the target he is trying to grapple. If the attack of opportunity deals the character damage, the character fails to start the grapple. If the attack of opportunity misses or otherwise fails to deal damage, proceed to step 2. 2. Grab: The character makes a melee touch attack to grab the target. If the character fails to hit the target, the character fails to start the grapple. If the character succeeds, proceed to step 3. 3. Hold: Make an opposed grapple check. (This is a free action.) If the character succeeds, the character has started the grapple, and deals damage to the target as if with an unarmed strike. If the character loses, he fails to start the grapple. The character automatically loses an attempt to hold if the target is two or more size categories larger than the character is (but the character can still make an attempt to grab such a target, if that’s all he wants to do). 4. Maintain the Grapple: To maintain the grapple for later rounds, the character must move into the target’s square. (This movement is free and does not count as part of the character’s movement for the round movement.) Moving, as normal, provokes attacks of opportunity from threatening enemies, but not from the target. The character and the target are now grappling. If the character cannot move into the target’s square, the character cannot maintain the grapple and must immediately let go of the target. To grapple again, the character must begin at step 1.

Grappling Consequences

While a character is grappling, his ability to attack others and defend himself is limited. No Threatened Squares: A character does not threaten any squares while grappling. No Dexterity Bonus: A character loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense (if the character has one) against opponents the character is not grappling. (The character can still use it against opponents he is grappling.) No Movement: A character cannot move while held in a grapple.

If the Character is Grappling

When a character is grappling (regardless of who started the grapple), he can attempt any of several actions on his turn. Unless otherwise noted, each of these options is equivalent to an attack. (If the character normally gets more than one attack per attack action, he can attempt as many of these options as he has attacks

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 available, using his or her successively lower attack bonus for each roll.) The character is limited to these options only; he cannot take any other actions. 

Attack with a Light Weapon – A character can attack with a light weapon while grappling (but not while pinned or pinning). A character cannot attack with two weapons while grappling.

Bite – The character can bite his opponent with a successful attack. Biting the opponent with a targeted attack, however, gives the character a bonus on his next grapple check on denoted on the table. A bite attack deals one point of damage unless the biter has a natural bite attack (which some creatures do). A character can only bite an opponent where flesh is exposed or light clothing is worn. If a character targets an area that is protected by armor, boot, or gloves, then the attack fails and no damaged is dealt.

Targeted Attack Arm Foot (toes) Hand (fingers) Head (nose or ear) Groin Leg

Grapple Bonus +2 +4 +4 +8 +6 +2

Break Another’s Pin – Make an opposed grapple check; if the character succeeds, he can break the hold that an opponent has over an ally.

Damage the Opponent – Make an opposed grapple check; if the character succeeds, he deals damage as with an unarmed strike.

Draw a Light Weapon – A character can draw a light weapon as a move action.

Escape from Grapple – Make an opposed grapple check. If the character succeeds, he can escape the grapple. If more than one opponent is grappling the character, the grapple check result has to beat all their check results to escape. (Opponents do not have to try to hold a character if they would rather not.) Alternatively, the character can make an Escape Artist check opposed by the opponent’s grapple check to escape from the grapple. This is an attack action that the character may only attempt once per round, even if the character gets multiple attacks. If the character has not used his move action for the round, the character may do so after escaping the grapple.

Escape from Pin – Make an opposed grapple check. If the character succeeds, he can escape from being pinned. (Opponents do not have to try to keep the character pinned if they do not want to.) The character is still being grappled, however. Alternatively, a character can make an Escape Artist check opposed by the opponent’s grapple check to escape from the pin. This is an attack action that the character may only attempt once per round, even if the character gets multiple attacks.

Eye Gouge – A character that is in a grapple can rake his opponent’s eyes to give him a +8 bonus to an escape attempt on his next Grapple or Escape Artist check. The character must make a successful targeted attack (head, –6 to attack roll). This maneuver deals no damage unless a critical result is score resulting in blinding the grappler.

Grapple and Release Maneuver – The character can perform a wrestling maneuver that deals damage and then releases the target into a prone position, such as a body slam.

Low Blow – A character can attempt to hit his opponent in the groin to get him to release the grapple. The character must make a targeted attack (groin, –6 to attack) and if successful deals normal damage (not the targeted modifier damage) and the grapple is released. The opponent must make a Fortitude save or be Stunned for one round.

Break Another’s Pin – Make an opposed grapple check; if the character succeeds, he can break the hold that an opponent has over an ally.

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218 Combat and Tactics 

Pin – Make an opposed grapple check; if the character succeeds, he holds the opponent immobile for 1 round. The opponent takes a –4 penalty to Defense against all attacks from other people (but not from the character); however, the opponent is not considered helpless. A character cannot use a weapon on a pinned character or attempt to damage or pin a second opponent while holding a pin on the first. A pinned character cannot take any action except to attempt to escape from the pin.

 Reverse Pin – A character can attempt to reverse the pin with a successful grapple check. To reverse the pin the character takes a –4 penalty to his grapple checks for the round and if successful, reverses the pin putting his opponent in the pinned position.  Special Maneuver – A character can perform a special maneuver with a successful grapple check at a –8 penalty. This maneuver deals triple Strength damage to the normal damage dealt by the attack, and the character can then choose to release the grapple leaving his opponent in a prone position or place his opponent in a pin. What this special grappling maneuver looks like is up the character.

If the Character is Pinned When an opponent has pinned the character, he is held immobile (but not helpless) for 1 round. (The character cannot attempt any other action.) On the character’s turn, he can attempt to escape from the pin. If the character succeeds, he is still grappling.

Joining a Grapple

If the target is already grappling someone else, a character can use an attack to start a grapple, as above, except that the target does not get an attack of opportunity against the character, and the character’s grab automatically succeeds. The character still has to make a successful opposed grapple check and move in to be part of the grapple. If multiple enemies are already involved in the grapple, the character picks one against whom to make the opposed grapple check.

Multiple Grapplers

Several combatants can be in a single grapple. Up to four combatants can grapple a single opponent in a given round. Creatures that are one size category smaller than the character count as one-half creature each; creatures that are one size category larger than the character count as two creatures; and creatures two or more size categories larger than the character count as four creatures. When involved in a grapple with multiple opponents, the character chooses one opponent to make an opposed check against. The exception is an attempt to escape from the grapple; to escape, a character’s grapple check must beat the check results of all opponents.

Overrun A character can attempt an overrun as an attack action made during his move action, or as part of a charge. (In general, a character cannot make an attack action during a move action; this is an exception.) In either case, the character does not get a 5-foot step before, during, or after the overrun attempt. With an overrun, the character attempts to move through an opponent’s area, going past or over the opponent. A character can only overrun an opponent who is one size category larger than the character, the same size, or smaller. A character can make only one overrun attempt per action. First, the character must move at least 10 feet in a straight line into the target’s square (provoking attacks of opportunity normally). Then the target chooses either to avoid the character or to block the character. If the opponent avoids the character, the character keeps moving.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 (A character can always move through a square occupied by someone who lets the character by.) If the opponent blocks the character, make a trip attack against the opponent (see Trip). If the character succeeds in tripping his opponent, the character can continue his movement as normal. If the character fails and is tripped in turn, the character falls prone in the target’s square. If the character fails but is not tripped, the character has to move 5 feet back the way he came, ending his movement there. If that square is occupied, the character falls prone in the square.

Trip A character can try to trip an opponent, or otherwise knock him down, as an unarmed melee attack. A character can only trip an opponent who is one size category larger than the character, the same size, or smaller.

Making a Trip Attack

Make an unarmed melee touch attack against the target. Doing this provokes an attack of opportunity from the target as normal for unarmed attacks. If the attack succeeds, make a Strength check opposed by the target’s Dexterity check or Strength check (using whichever ability score has the higher modifier). If the character and the target are different sizes, the larger combatant gets a bonus on the Strength check of +4 per difference in size category. The target gets a +4 stability bonus on his check if he has more than two legs or is otherwise exceptionally stable. If the character wins, he trips the target. If the character loses, the target may immediately react and make a Strength check opposed by the character’s Dexterity check or Strength check to try to trip the character.

Being Tripped (Prone) A tripped character is prone. Standing up from a prone position is a move action.

Tripping with a Weapon Some weapons, such as the chain and the whip, can be used to make trip attacks. A character does not incur an attack of opportunity when doing so. If the character is tripped during his own trip attempt, the character can drop the weapon to avoid being tripped.

Targeted Attacks A character or semi-intelligent creature (Int 6+) may make a targeted attack against an opponent or specific area on an object or item as a Full-round attack action. Descriptions for targeted attacks against biological humanoids and quadrupeds are below; tables describing alternative targets for different kinds of critters (Robots, insectiod animals) are listed below. A generic "mutation" template is also provided for critters that do not fit in any other category. While the specific targets may be different, the effect of targeted attacks on these other critters is the same. Targeted Attacks Anatomy Part Arm or Upper Appendage Eye, Feelers, Ocular Input, or Sensors Foot Hand Head, CPU, or Brainpan Groin, Servo, or Weak Point Leg, Locomotion Device, or Lower Appendage Torso or Body

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Attack Roll Penalty –4 –10 –8 –8 –6 –6 –2 –0

Normal Results x2 damage

x2 damage x1.5 damage

Critical Results Crippled Blinded Crippled Crippled Concussion x3 damage Crippled

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220 Combat and Tactics Normal result: Some targeted attacks deal additional damage as detailed on the chart above.

Critical results: If a critical hit is confirmed on a targeted attack, the creature hit takes both normal and critical result damages.

Blinded: The character is blinded and suffers the effects of being blinded as detailed in the Condition Summary. The Overseer can judge that the character is blinded in only one eye and only suffers half of the penalties bestowed from being blinded.

Concussion: The character has taken a mighty wound to the cranium. He loses his Dexterity bonus, takes 4 points of temporary Intelligence and Wisdom damage and can only make Standard actions, until the effects of the concussion wears off. The effect of the temporary damage returns at the standard ability healing rate.

Crippled: A character that is crippled cannot use the crippled appendage until fixed up by a doctor (see the Treat Injury skill detailed in Chapter 2). Arm: The character is limited to one-handed weapons and suffers a –4 penalties to Dexterity based skill checks that require the use of either arms or hands. Foot: The character’s speed is reduced by 10 and he cannot run. Hand: The character is limited to one-handed weapons and suffers a –4 penalties to Dexterity based skill checks that require the use of both hands. Leg: The speed of the character is reduced by one-half base (round up), and he cannot run. Additionally, he suffers a –4 penalties to Dexterity based skill checks that require the use of both legs.

Environmental Dangers Darkness and Light It is a rare mission that does not end up in the dark somewhere, and heroes need a way to see. See Light Sources for the radius that a light source illuminates and how long it lasts.

Heat and Cold

Light Sources Item Candle Torch Halogen lantern Flashlight

Light 5 feet 20 feet 40 feet 20 feet*

Duration 12 hours 2 hours 24 hours 6 hours

*Creates a beam 30 feet long and 5 feet high. Heat and cold deal damage that cannot be recovered until the character counteracts or escapes the inclement temperature. As soon as the character suffers any damage from heat or cold, he is considered fatigued. A character not properly equipped to counteract the heat or cold must attempt a Fortitude saving throw each hour (DC 15, +1 for each previous check). Failure means that the character loses 1d4 hit points. Heavy clothing or armor provides a –4 penalty on saves against heat, but grants a +4 equipment bonus on saves

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against cold. A character who succeeds at a Survival check (DC 15) gains a +4 competence bonus on the save (see the Survival skill). Searing heat or bitter cold (desert or arctic conditions) forces a character to make a Fortitude save every 10 minutes. Failure means that the character loses 1d6 hit points. Appropriate clothing and successful use of the Survival skill can modify the save, as noted above.

Catching on Fire Heroes exposed to open flames might find their clothes, hair, or equipment on fire. Heroes at risk of catching fire are allowed a Reflex saving throw (DC 15) to avoid this fate. If a hero’s clothes or hair catch fire, he takes 1d6 points of damage immediately. In each subsequent round, the burning hero must make another Reflex saving throw. Failure means he takes another 1d6 points of damage that round. Success means that the fire has gone out. (That is, once the character succeeds at the saving throw, he is no longer on fire.) A hero on fire may automatically extinguish the flames by jumping into enough water to douse himself. If no body of water is at hand, rolling on the ground or smothering the fire with blankets or the like permits the hero another save with a +4 bonus.

Starvation and Thirst Sometimes heroes might find themselves without food and water. In normal climates, heroes need at least a 1/2 gallon of fluids and about 1/4 a pound of decent food per day to avoid the threat of starvation. In very hot climates, heroes need two or three times as much water to avoid dehydration. A character can go without water for one day plus the number of hours equal to his Constitution score. After this, the character must make a Constitution check each hour (DC 10, +1 for each previous check) or take 1d6 points of damage. A character can go without food for three days, in growing discomfort. After this, the character must make a Constitution check each day (DC 10, +1 for each previous check) or sustain 1d6 points of damage. Damage from thirst or starvation cannot be recovered until the hero gets water or food, as needed.

Suffocation and Drowning A character in an airless environment (underwater, vacuum) can hold his breath for the number of rounds equal to his Constitution score. After this period of time, the character must make a Constitution check (DC 10) every round to continue holding his breath. Each round, the DC of the Constitution check increases by 1. When the character fails one of these Constitution checks, he begins to suffocate or drown. In the next round, the character falls unconscious with 0 hit points. In the following round, the character drops to –1 hit points and is dying. In the third round after failing the check, the character dies of suffocation or drowning.

Smoke Characters breathing heavy smoke or similar toxic gases must make a Constitution check (DC 10, +1 for each previous check) each round or spend that round choking and coughing. Characters who choke for 2 consecutive rounds take 1d6 points of damage. Smoke also obscures vision, giving one-half concealment (20% miss chance) to characters caught within.

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222 Combat and Tactics Strangulation When a character is strangled by an instrument or an attacker, use the rules below. A character can strangle or choke a target of the same size category, one size category larger, or one size category smaller. The strangling attempt incurs an attack of opportunity. To begin the choke, the attacker must succeed at an opposed grapple check. If the grapple succeeds, the attacker can choose to deal normal unarmed damage as well as choke the target. The target can hold his breath for the number of rounds equal to his Constitution score. After this period of time, the target must make a Constitution check (DC 10, +1 for each previous check) every round to continue holding his breath. The target begins to suffocate on a failed check (see Suffocation and Drowning). If at any time the target breaks free or slips free of the grapple, the stranglehold is broken (although any damage that was dealt remains). Note that a grappled target who is not pinned can use his attack action to strangle his attacker.

Falling A character takes 1d6 points of damage for every 10 feet of a fall, to a maximum of 20d6 points. If the character succeeds on a Reflex saving throw (DC 10, +1 for each 10 feet fallen), this damage is halved. If the saving throw fails, full damage is applied. A character can make a Tumble check (DC 15) to treat a fall as if it were 10 feet shorter when determining the damage and Reflex saving throw DC required by the fall.

Falling Objects Objects that fall upon characters (or creatures or vehicles) deal damage based on their size and the distance fallen, as noted in the Damage from Falling Objects table.

Damage from Falling Objects Object Size

Examples

Fine Diminutive Tiny Small Mediumsize Large Huge Gargantuan Colossal

Coin Paperweight Wrench Vase Briefcase

Initial Damage 0 1 1d3 1d4 1d6

Reflex Save DC n/a 0 5 10 15

Strength Check DC n/a n/a n/a 5 10

Objects deal the initial damage given in the Damage from Falling Objects table if they fall 10 feet or less. An object deals an additional 1d6 Garbage can 2d6 20 20 Oil barrel 4d6 25 30 points of damage for every 10Piano 8d6 30 40 foot increment it falls beyond Vehicle 10d6 35 50 the first (to a maximum of 20d6 points of damage). Objects of Fine size are too small to deal damage, regardless of the distance fallen. A successful Reflex save indicates that the target takes half damage. The size of the falling object determines the save DC. If the save fails by 10 or more, and the object is at least three size categories larger than the character, the character is pinned under the fallen object. A pinned character cannot move but is not helpless. The character can make a Strength check to lift the object off himself or an Escape Artist check (DC 20) to get out from underneath. The Overseer can modify the DCs for these checks based on the circ*mstances.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Poison When a character takes damage from an attack with a poisoned weapon, touches an item smeared with contact poison, consumes a poisonous substance, inhales a poisonous gas, or is otherwise poisoned, the character must make a Fortitude saving throw. If the character fails, he takes the poison’s initial damage (usually ability damage). Even if the character succeeds, he typically faces secondary damage 1 minute later. This secondary damage also requires a Fortitude saving throw to avoid. Poisons are detailed in the Craft(chemical) skill Description. Poisonous liquids are usually administered through injection or by application to a weapon. Poisonous gases must be inhaled to be effective. Poisonous solids are usually ingested with food or drink.

Perils of Using Poison

A character has a 5% chance (roll of 1 on 1d20) to expose himself to a poison whenever the character applies it to a weapon or otherwise readies it for use. Additionally, a character who rolls a 1 on an attack roll with a poisoned weapon must succeed at a Reflex saving throw (DC 15) or accidentally poison himself with the weapon.

Poison Immunity Creatures with natural poison attacks are immune to their own poison. Nonliving creatures and creatures without metabolisms are immune to poison. Oozes and certain kinds of creatures are immune to poison, as detailed in their Descriptions, though it is conceivable that a special poison could be synthesized specifically to harm them.

Disease When a character is exposed to a treatable disease, the character must make an immediate Fortitude saving throw. The victim must make this roll when he comes into contact with an infectious carrier, touches an item smeared with diseased matter, consumes food or drink tainted with a disease, or suffers damage from a contaminated attack. If the character succeeds, the disease has no effect on him—the character’s immune system fights off the infection. If the character fails the save, he takes damage after an incubation period; once per day thereafter, the character must succeed at a Fortitude saving throw to avoid secondary damage. Two successful saving throws in a row indicate that the character has fought off the disease and recovers, taking no more damage. The characteristics of some treatable diseases are summarized on the Diseases table. Type: The disease’s method of delivery—ingested, inhaled, or via an injury —and the DC needed to save. Some injury diseases can be transmitted by a wound as small as an insect bite. Most diseases that are inhaled can also be ingested (and vice versa). Incubation Period: The amount of time before initial damage takes effect (if the victim fails his Fortitude save). Initial Damage: The damage the victim takes after the incubation period.

Diseases Disease

Type

Secondary Damage: The amount of damage the hero takes one day after taking initial damage, if he fails a second saving throw. This damage is taken each day the saving throw fails.

Anthrax

Pneumonia

Inhaled/Injury DC 16 Inhaled/Contact DC 15 Inhaled DC 12

Hantavirus Necrotizing Fasciitis Blood Fly Virus Salmonellae

Small pox

Incubation Period 1d2 days

Initial Damage 1 Con

Secondary Damage 1d4 Con*

2d4 days 1d4 days

1 Str and 1 Con 1 Str

Injury DC 14

1 day

1d2 Str

Contact DC 13

1d6 days

1 Con

1d2 Str and 1d2 Con 1d3 Str and 1d3 Con 1d2 Str* and 1d2 Con* 1d3 Con*

Injury DC 12

1d4 days

Ingested DC 13

1 day

1 Dex and 1 Con 1 Str and 1 Dex

1d2 Dex and 1d2 Con* 1 Str and 1d3 Dex

*If damage is sustained, make a second saving throw to avoid 1 point being permanently drained (instead of damaged).

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224 Combat and Tactics Acid Corrosive acids deal damage each round of exposure. The amount of damage varies depending on the acid’s strength, as noted on the Acid Damage table below. Acid damage from an attack reduces hit points. A Acid Damage character fully immersed in acid takes potentially more Acid Strength Splash Attack* Total Immersion* damage per round of exposure than a character splashed Mild 1d6 1d10 with acid. Potent 2d6 2d10 The fumes from most acids are inhaled poisons. Those Concentrated 3d6 3d10 who come within 5 feet of a large body of acid must *Damage per round of exposure. make a Fortitude save (DC 15) or take 1 point of temporary Constitution damage. A second save must succeed 1 minute later to avoid taking another 1d4 points of Constitution damage.

Electricity Electrical hazards come in many Electricity Damage forms, including stun guns, downed Type Examples Damage Fort DC power lines, and electric security Jolt Car battery, stun gun 1d3 10 fences. The Electricity Damage Low voltage Fuse box, electrical socket 2d6 15 table below gives damage values Medium voltage Industrial transformer, electric fence 4d6 15 for various electrical hazards based High voltage Power line, electric chair, lightning 8d6 20 on relative voltage. A character can make a Fortitude saving throw to reduce the damage by half. If that character is not grounded or is otherwise insulated from the current, a successful save indicates that no damage is suffered.

Radiation In 2012, the lands and bodies of water in the civilized world became radiated by fallout produced from millions of nuclear bombs detonations. Places that were once safe to hold daily activities with the children (provided you survived the bombs) became void of life from toxic radiation. Over the passing of years, the level of radiation has dropped, and inhabitants of the milder radiated area have adapted to the environment. Still, radiation exists in the world that will have you puking your lungs out, so make sure you have a good supply of Radium X and Rad-Blocker 2 before exploring the radiated wastes.

Effects of Radiation

When a character or creature comes into contact with radioactive material (such as uranium or plutonium) or a radiated area, they are subject to radiation over a exposure period and possible radiation sickness following the exposure period. Radiation is measured in RAD (Radiation Absorbed Dose) units and has eight degrees of exposure as displayed in the chart below. To determine the degree of exposure consult the chart below to determine the exposure time that saving throws are made. While a character is in a radiated area, he gains the minimum amount of RADs from the Degree of Exposure over the course of the Exposure Period and the full amount over

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double the Exposure Period. A character can never exceed the RADs of a single Degree of Exposure, until moving into a deadlier radiated area. To determine how radiated a character is for short Exposure Periods not reaching the full length of exposure divide the minimum RADs of the Degree of Exposure by the of time that the character has been in the radiated area. Example: Kenny explores some ruins that emit low levels of radiation. Kenny remains in the radiated area for an hour before leaving and returning back to town (an area that is not radiated). Kenny suffers light radiation exposure and has a RAD level of 150. Kenny loses 25 RADs over the course of the day and night, still having 125 RADs on the next day, and must succeed a Fortitude save under Light Radiation Exposure. The next day Kenny’s RAD level drops by 25 again to 100, and he must make another Radiation Sickness Fortitude save under the Prolonging Damage.

Radiation Exposure

Radiation Sickness

Degree of Exposure RAD Exposure Period Fortitude Save DC Initial and Prolonged Damage¹ Weak Less than 100 3 days 5 1d2–1 Con² Light 100-199 1 day 8 1d3–1 Con² Mild 200-299 6 hours 12 1d4–1 Con² Low 300-599 2 hours 15 1d6–1 Con² Moderate 600-999 30 minutes 18 2d4 Con High 1000-4999 5 minutes 21 2d6 Con Severe 5000-8000 1 minute 26 3d6 Con Deadly More than 8000 1 round 30 4d6 Con³ ¹ All radiated character suffers from a Radiated effect until the radiation sickness is removed or his RADs become 0. ² Minimum damage 0 Con. ³ If Constitution is reduced below zero there is a 1% chance per point below zero that the character will turn into a Ghūl instead of dying.

Radiation Sickness

When a character is exposed to radiation, he may be afflicted with Radiation Sickness and its prolonged effects. Radiation Sickness functions exactly like exposure to any other poison, except for prolonged damage. The Fortitude save DC and the effects of Radiation Sickness vary with the dose of radiation (Degrees of Exposure) to which a creature is exposed. The Fortitude save is made at the end of the Exposure Period, and as long as a character has RADs, is made again at an equal length until the character leaves the irradiated area. Characters that have RADs are still subject to prolonged damage until the RAD level reaches zero. Use the RAD level and Exposure Period to determine the new Fortitude save for Radiation Sickness as the character’s RADs eventually will decrease outside the irradiated area (see RAD recovery below).

RAD Degrees and Sickness Effects

Weak (less than 100 RAD): There are no noticeable symptoms. The target’s red blood cell count decreases temporarily, however, and he may suffer from headache and increased risk of infection due to disruption of immunity cells. Temporary male sterility is also possible. Light (100 – 199 RAD): Mild to moderate nausea with occasional vomiting beginning 1 day after irradiation and lasting for up to one day. The immune system is depressed, with increased risk of infection. Temporary sterility is common in both men and women. Mild (200 – 299 RAD): Nausea is common with vomiting after 12 hours from exposure and lasts for 2 days. If not treated after 2 days, the character suffers from loss of hair, fatigue and general illness. There is a massive loss of white blood cell, greatly increasing the risk of infection. Permanent sterility is possible. Low (300 – 599 RAD): Mild symptoms (as above) begin to show after 4 hour of exposure with uncontrollable bleeding in the mouth, under the skin and in the kidneys.

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226 Combat and Tactics Moderate (600 – 999 RAD): Low symptoms (as above) begin to show after 1 hour of exposure with survival depending on intense medical care (or lots of Rad-Blocker 2). Bone marrow is nearly destroyed; intestinal tissues are severely damaged causing internal bleeding. High (1,000 – 4,999 RAD): Moderate symptoms (as above) begin to show after 10 minutes of exposure with fatigue and immediate nausea caused by brain damage by the irradiation. After that, cell death in the gastric and intestinal tissue, causing massive diarrhea, intestinal bleeding and loss of water. Severe (5,000 – 8,000 RAD): Immediate disorientation and coma within 2 minutes. Death occurs after a few hours by total collapse of nervous system. Deadly (Over 8,000 RAD): Expect immediate death.

Treating Radiation and RAD Recovery

Radiation sickness is considered treatable and can be cured using the “Treat Radiation Sickness” aspect of the Treat Injury skill to fend off Prolonged Damage (see Treat Injury for more details). A character can recover naturally from the effect of Radiation. Each day that a character is out of an irradiated area he regains 25 RAD (just a little over 1 per hour) per day. Additionally, the drug Radium X can be used to stave off the effects of radiation and Radiation Sickness, each dose removes 1000 RAD over the course of four hours.

Toxic Waste Toxic waste is hazardous waste that is radioactive or poisonous. In 2012, chemical and plastics manufacturing industry produced millions of barrels of waste in the service of the US military. The waste was stored in large caves or in underground facilities, and some companies dumped illegally near populated areas to save money. After the bombs dropped, these sites became another lost page in history. Most of these barrels of waste have eroded with time, leaving behind toxic puddles or pools. Toxic waste affects characters and creatures in two ways: First, there is the chemical burn (treat as acid) and second, exposure to radiation (low). Contact with toxic waste deals 1d6 points of damage per round and ignores 6 points of hardness. The damaging effects of the toxic waste lasts for 1d4 rounds after initial contact. Should a target be submerged in a pool of toxic waste, he will take 10d6 points of damage per round of submersion.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Structural Dangers Collapse (ceiling 10x10) Collapse (ceiling 20x20) Collapse (floor 10x10) Collapse (floor 20x20) Collapse (structure, ¼) Collapse (structure, half) Collapse (structure, whole) Collapse (wall 10x10) Collapse (wall 20x20) Falling Debris (small) Falling Debris (large) Floor (foot through floor)

Reflex Save 15 20 18 23 20 25 30 15 20 15 18 12

Damage 3d6 5d6 3d6 5d6 5d6 8d6 12d6 3d6 5d6 1d6 3d6 1d4

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Structures Within the Wastelands are many ruined and unsafe structures left from the Exodus. Many of these structures were only built to last for a limited amount of time; however, some of these structures have bested time and remain still. When exploring a ruined structure there is a chance for unsafe conditions.

As the Overseer, you can determine the effects of a structure that a party of character explores. Not all structures are unsafe, but as a rule of thumb, there is a 10% base chance that each floor of a building has a chance of unsafe conditions. This starts at the base ground floor entry of a typical building that is on a basem*nt and cumulates as the building goes higher. Of course, the reverse is true for underground structures, here the lowest level would be the 10% base and would work upwards. So it is possible that a party of explorers entering an old fallout shelter would have 30% chance of encountering a structural mishap on the first floor or three. There also are areas that have no damage or fallout shelter structures that have been repaired by the repair bots that are still linked to an operating computer system. Such areas as this do not pose a structural threat and should be encountered about 10 percent of the time as the players explore the Wastelands. A planned structural adventure should factor in a +1 EL to encounters that take place in a room or building with structural fault.

Death, Dying, and Healing Injury and Death Hit points measure how hard a character is to kill. Hit points mean two things in the game world: the ability to take physical punishment and keep going, and the ability to turn a serious blow into a less serious one.

Effects of Hit Point Damage At 0 hit points, a character is disabled. At –1 to –9 hit points, a character is dying. At –10 or lower, a character is dead.

Massive Damage

Any time a character takes damage from a single hit that exceeds the character’s massive damage threshold, that damage is considered massive damage. A character’s massive damage threshold is equal to the character’s current Constitution score; it can be increased by taking the Improved Damage Threshold feat. When a character takes massive damage that does not reduce his hit points to 0 or lower, the character must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). If the character fails the save, the character’s hit point total is immediately reduced to –1. If the save succeeds, the character suffers no ill effect beyond the loss of hit points. Creatures immune to critical hits are also immune to the effects of massive damage.

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228 Combat and Tactics Non-lethal Damage Non-lethal damage is dealt by unarmed attackers and some weapons. Melee weapons that deal lethal damage can be wielded so as to deal non-lethal damage, but the attacker takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls for trying to deal non-lethal damage instead of lethal damage. A ranged weapon that deals lethal damage cannot be made to deal non-lethal damage (unless it is used as an improvised melee weapon). Non-lethal damage does not affect the target’s hit points. Instead, compare the amount of non-lethal damage from an attack to the target’s massive damage threshold. If the amount is less than the target’s massive damage threshold, then the target is unaffected by the attack. If the damage equals or exceeds the target’s massive damage threshold, the target must make a Fortitude save (DC 15). If the target succeeds on the save, the target is dazed for 1 round. If the target fails, he or she is knocked unconscious for 1d4+1 rounds.

Disabled (0 Hit Points)

When a character’s current hit points drop to exactly 0, the character is disabled. The character is not unconscious, but he is close to it. The character can only take a single move or attack action each turn (but not both; nor can the character take full-round actions). The character can take non-strenuous move actions without further injuring himself, but if the character attacks or perform any other action the Overseer deems as strenuous, the character takes 1 point of damage after completing the act. Unless the activity increased the character’s hit points, the character is now at –1 hit points, and is dying. Healing that raises the character above 0 hit points makes him fully functional again, just as if the character had never been reduced to 0 or lower. A character can also become disabled when recovering from dying. In this case, it is a step up along the road to recovery, and the character can have fewer than 0 hit points (see Stable Characters and Recovery).

Dying (–1 to –9 Hit Points)

When a character’s current hit points drop below 0 the character is dying. A dying character has a current hit point total between –1 and –9, inclusive. A dying character immediately falls unconscious and can take no actions. A dying character loses 1 hit point every round. This continues until the character dies or becomes stable naturally or with help (see below).

Dead (–10 hit points or lower)

When a character’s current hit points drop to die if his Constitution is reduced to 0.

–10 or lower, he is dead. A character can also

Stable Characters and Recovery A dying character (one with –1 to –9 hit points) is unconscious and loses 1 hit point every round until he becomes stable or dies.

Recovering without Help

Each round, a dying character makes a Fortitude saving throw (DC 20). If the save fails, the character loses 1 hit point and must make another save on his turn the next round. If the save succeeds, the character becomes stable. A stable character stops losing hit points every round, but remains unconscious. If no one tends to the stable character (see below), he remains unconscious for 1 hour, at which point he makes a Fortitude save (DC 20). If the save succeeds, the stable character regains consciousness, becoming disabled (see above). The character’s current hit point total remains where it is, however, even

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though it is negative. If the save fails, the character remains unconscious. An unaided stable, conscious character who has negative hit points (and is disabled) does not heal naturally. Instead, each day the character makes a Fortitude save (DC 20) to start recovering hit points naturally for that day; if the save fails, he loses 1 hit point. Once an unaided character starts recovering hit points naturally, the character is no longer in danger of losing additional hit points (even if his current hit point total is still negative).

Recovering with Help A dying character can be made stable by the use of the Treat Injury skill (DC 15). One hour after a tended, dying character becomes stable, he makes a Fortitude save (DC 20) to regain consciousness. If successful, the character becomes disabled (see above). If the character remains unconscious, he makes the same Fortitude save every hour until he becomes conscious. Even while unconscious, the character recovers hit points naturally, and he can return to normal activity when his hit points rise to 1 or higher.

Healing After taking damage, a character can recover hit points through natural healing (over the course of days) or through medical technology (somewhat faster). In any case, a character cannot regain hit points past his full normal total.

Natural Healing A character recovers 1 hit point per character level per evening of rest (8 hours of sleep). A character undergoing complete bed rest (doing nothing for an entire day) recovers 2 hit points per character level.

Healing Ability Damage

Ability damage returns at the rate of 1 point per evening of rest (8 hours of sleep). Complete bed rest (24 hours) restores 2 points per day.

Temporary Hit Points

Certain effects can give a character temporary hit points. When a character gains temporary hit points, make a note of his current hit points before adding the temporary hit points. When the temporary hit points go away, the character’s hit points drop to that score. If the character’s hit points are already below that score at that time, all the temporary hit points have already been lost, and the character’s hit point total does not drop. When temporary hit points are lost, they cannot be restored as real hit points can be, even with medical treatment.

Increases in Constitution Score and Current Hit Points

An increase in a character’s Constitution score— even a temporary one —can give the character more hit points (an effective hit point increase), but these are not temporary hit points. They can be restored through normal healing. When a character’s Constitution drops back down to its previous score after a temporary increase, the character’s full normal hit points go down accordingly.

Chemical Addiction Chemical or drug addiction is defined as the compulsive physiological need for a habitforming substance. An addict is driven both by a gnawing hunger for his drug of choice and by the knowledge of how miserable they will be if they

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230 Combat and Tactics cannot obtain their fix. If they possess a supply of their drug they must fight the compulsion to take more and more “hits” of the substance; and, if they do not possess a supply, then they are consumed by the thought of how and when they will obtain more of their “poison” of choice. A character can become addicted to a given chemical in a single does if he is unlucky. Each time the character takes a dose of an addictive chemical he has a percentage chance of addiction that is listed in the Description of the chemical in Chapter 4 for the player’s knowledge of the risk. If the percentile roll is within the chance of addiction the character becomes addicted. Chemical addiction is a temporary condition based on the chemistry of the individual chemical as denoted on the addiction chart on the following page. An addiction can last several days to weeks and has a detrimental effect on the character during the withdrawal and recovery period. Chemicals (Drugs) Afterburner Black Sunshine

Addiction % 20%

Addiction Effects 1 –2 CON, –4 WIS

Fortitude Save 35

25%

Blindness

30

Burnout

35%

Inferno Mindmeld Mutagen Rad-Blocker 2

20% 15% 40% 10%

One of the following: (d% roll) Blindness (01-45), Deafened (46-90), or both (91-100) –8 DEX, –4 Initiative Concussion –8 STR and –4 CON –2 Fortitude save –6 STR and DEX, –2 Initiative –6 DEX, –2 Initiative

40 45 35 45 30

Chemical Addiction Terms Addition %: This is the percentage of time that a user will become addicted to a particular chemical. Addiction Effects: This is the detrimental effect the addiction, from the chemical, has on the addicted user until the character recovers by succeeding on a Fortitude save.

Fortitude Save: A character can break the addiction’s detrimental effects with a successful Fortitude save. If the save is Vigoriods 25% 40 successful, the user will begin regaining his ability scores at their normal healing Voodoo 20% 40 rate (usually 1 point per ability score per 1 If an ability score is reduced to 0 (except CON), then the character is catatonic until he is day). Failure means that the character able to make the Fortitude save to beat the addiction. The character must be cared and treated for during this state or he faces starvation. If a character’s CON is reduced to 0, then fails to break the addiction, still suffering the character has overdosed on the drug and is dead Jim. the effect until 24 hours has passed, where upon the save may be attempted again to break the addiction with a +1 cumulative recovery bonus per day of addiction. Example: Rex has a +6 Fortitude save and is addicted to Mindmelds needing a DC 35 to succeed. Rex does not have a chance to succeed until 9 days have passed. After 9 days of addiction, Rex then gains a +9 resistance bonus for a total of +15 to his Fortitude roll. This means that now he has a chance to start to recover, which improves each day until the Fortitude save succeeds.

Chemical Use during Addiction

Poor willpower causes addicted characters to use the drug during an addition period. Using an addicted drug is a real possible to offset some of the addiction penalties, but the user gains the benefits only to add to the addiction penalty. Example: Rex is addicted to Mindmeld, and does not have the willpower to resist the cravings and takes a dose. Rex is already suffering the addicted effects of –4 INT and WIS, but gains the benefits of taking the drug. Rex now only suffers a –2 INT and WIS and gains +2 CHR until the chemical effects lapse.

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Condition Summary A number of adverse conditions can affect the way a character operates, as defined here. If more than one condition affects a character, apply both if possible. If not possible, apply only the most severe condition.

Ability Damaged The character has lost 1 or more ability score points. The loss is temporary, and these points return at a rate of 1 per evening of rest. This differs from “effective” ability loss, which is an effect that goes away when the condition causing it goes away.

Ability Drained

The character has lost 1 or more ability score points. The loss is permanent.

Blinded

The hero cannot see at all, and thus everything has total concealment to him. The character has a 50% chance to miss in combat. Furthermore, the blinded character has an effective Dexterity of 3, along with a –4 penalty on the use of Strength-based and Dexterity-based skills. This –4 penalty also applies to Search checks and any other skill checks for which the Overseer deems sight to be important. The character cannot make Spot checks or perform any other activity (such as reading) that requires vision. Heroes who are blind long-term (from birth or early in life) grow accustomed to these drawbacks and can overcome some of them (at the Overseer’s discretion).

Cowering The hero is frozen in fear, loses his Dexterity bonus, and can take no actions. In addition, the character takes a –2 penalty to his Defense. The condition typically lasts 10 rounds.

Crippled The hero has been cankled, and suffers penalties to Dexterity and/or Speed based on the appendage that is crippled (see Targeted Attacks for more details).

Dazed

Unable to act, a dazed character can take no actions, but still gets the benefit of his normal Defense. This condition typically lasts 1 round.

Dead

A character dies when his hit points drop to –10 or lower, or when his Constitution drops to 0.

Deafened

The hero cannot hear and takes a –4 penalty on initiative checks. The character cannot make Listen checks. Heroes who are deafened long-term (from birth or early in life) grow accustomed to these drawbacks and can overcome some of them (at the Overseer’s discretion).

Disabled

The character has 0 hit points. The character can take only a single move action or attack action, and takes 1 point of damage after any action.

Dying The character is near death and unconscious, with –1 to –9 wound points. The character can take no actions, and each round a dying character loses 1 hit point until he dies or becomes stable.

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232 Combat and Tactics Entangled An entangled character takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls in addition to a –4 penalty to Dexterity. If the entangling bonds are anchored to an immobile object, the entangled hero cannot move. Otherwise, the character can move at half speed, but cannot run or charge.

Exhausted

Characters who are exhausted move at half speed and cannot run or charge. Furthermore, they take a –6 penalty to Strength and Dexterity. After 1 hour of complete, uninterrupted rest, an exhausted character becomes fatigued.

Fatigued Characters who are fatigued cannot run or charge and take a penalty of –2 to Strength and Dexterity. After 8 hours of complete, uninterrupted rest, a fatigued character is no longer fatigued.

Flat-Footed A character who has not yet acted during a combat is flat-footed, not reacting normally to the situation. A flat-footed character loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense and cannot make attacks of opportunity.

Grappled When grappled, a character cannot undertake any action other than attacking with his bare hands, attacking with a light weapon, or attempting to break free from his opponent. The character loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense, except on attacks from characters with whom he is grappling.

Helpless

Paralyzed, sleeping, or unconscious characters are helpless. A helpless character has an effective Defense of 5 + size modifier. An attacker can attempt a coup de grace against a helpless character.

Irradiated

A character that has a RAD score is irradiated and may be suffering from the effects of Radiation Sickness (see Radiation for more details).

Nauseated Characters who are nauseated are unable to attack or do anything else requiring attention or concentration. The only action such a character can take is a single move action per turn.

Panicked A panicked character flees as fast as possible and cowers (see Cowering, above) if unable to get away. The character defends normally but cannot attack.

Paralyzed Heroes who are paralyzed fall to the ground unable to move (they have an effective, but not actual, Dexterity and Strength of 0). They are helpless.

Pinned

A pinned character is held immobile (but not helpless) in a grapple. The character takes a –4 penalty to Defense against melee attacks and loses his Dexterity bonus to Defense.

Prone

An attacker who is prone (lying on the ground) takes a –4 penalty on melee attack rolls and cannot use bows or thrown ranged weapons. The character gains a +4 bonus to Defense against ranged attacks, but takes a –4 penalty to Defense against melee attacks.

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Shaken

A shaken character takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls, saving throws, and skill checks.

Stable A stable character is no longer dying, but is still unconscious.

Stunned A character who becomes stunned loses his Dexterity bonus, drops what he is holding, and can take no attack or move actions. In addition, the character takes a –2 penalty to Defense. The condition typically lasts 1 round.

Unconscious

An unconscious character is unable to defend himself. The character is helpless and typically falls prone.

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234 Advanced Classes

Chapter VI Advanced Classes Several advanced classes are available for heroes who have excelled in the Wastes, or wish to specialize or join an organization. Many requirements for advanced classes are based on plotlines; Overseers will want to discuss with their players what advanced classes the players might choose, so they can plan accordingly. Some Modern SRD Advanced Classes have been included in this chapter. These classes have been updated and modified to fit into the Exodus campaign setting. Some of these classes have been renamed, and will be denoted in the initial descriptive text of the class.

Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunters are hired Wasteland warriors that excel in finding an individual or group to capture or kill based on the contract terms made with the employer. Look out Dawg, a new hunter is in town!

Requirements

To qualify to become a Bounty Hunter, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2 Skills: Investigate 6 ranks, Sense Motive 6 ranks, Knowledge (underworld) 3 ranks, and Survival 4 ranks.

Feats: Track, and Personal Firearms Proficiency or Archaic Weapons Proficiency.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Bounty Hunter Advanced Class.

Hit Die

Bounty Hunters gain 1d8 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points A Bounty Hunter receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills The Bounty Hunter’s class skills are as follows: Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Intimidate, Investigate, Knowledge (geography, occult, street, and underworld), Listen, Profession, Research, Search, Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival.

Skill Points at Each Level: 3 + Intelligence modifier.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Class Features The following features pertain to the Bounty Hunter Advanced Class.

Target Bonus

The Bounty Hunter Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Target bonus +1 Swift track Bonus feat No trace, target bonus +2 Play a hunch Bonus feat Target bonus +3 Perception Bonus feat Locate target

The Bounty Hunter, as a full-round action, may designate an individual as a target. He spends one Karma Point to select a target, and thereafter gains a competence bonus on certain actions involving that particular target. The Bounty Hunter does not need to know the target personally and may know him only through his actions or Description. The Bounty Hunter may not select a target while he or the target is in combat; and, once he chooses a target, he must wait 24 hours before choosing another. The Bounty Hunter gains the target bonus as a competence bonus on attacks against that particular target, as well as when using the following skills directly against the target, or in tracking a target: Bluff, Computer Use, Gather Information, Investigate, Listen, Research, Search, Sense Motive, and Spot. The target bonus applies to a single individual and lasts until the Bounty Hunter chooses a new target. The bonus is +1 at 1st level, +2 at 4th, and +3 at 7th level.

Swift Track

At 2nd level, the Bounty Hunter may move at normal speed while using Track without taking the –5 penalty. Bounty Hunter Bonus Feats Adrenaline Rush, Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), Awareness, Brawl, Die Hard, Endurance, Explorer, HtH Fighter, Improved Brawl, Improved Feint, Improved Grapple, Improved Knockout Punch, Knockout Punch, Quick Pockets, Quick Recovery, Street Fighting, and Stuntman.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th levels, the Bounty Hunter gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Bounty Hunter must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

No Trace

At 4th level, the Bounty Hunter knows how to hide his own tracks, and may, at his choice, move into “No Trace” mode. All attempts to use the Track feat against the Bounty Hunter (though not allies) treat the ground as “firm” for purposes of success. In addition, the DC of any attempts to use Computer Use, Gather Information, Investigate, and Research on matters involving the Bounty Hunter are increased by the Bounty Hunter’s advanced class levels.

Play a Hunch

At 5th level, the Bounty Hunter can call on a ‘gut feeling’ and may make a guess to be assured that it is correct. The Bounty Hunter may, as a full-round action, spend a Karma Point to determine whether an assumption, hunch, or guess is correct. The player states the assertion and pays a Karma Point. The Overseer secretly rolls percentile dice with a success rate of 70% +1% per Bounty Hunter advance class level chance of getting a response on the hunch (failure indicates merely that the character is unsure if this is true or not). If the roll is a success, the character has a strong feeling that the hunch is true, false, both or neither. A “both” response is possible for vague assumptions. An “unknown” response is for questions with no immediate answer. It may be determined that a hunch is so obvious that it does not require a roll, or that it is so vague that there is no chance for success. In these cases, the Karma Point is not spent (though the attempt still counts as a fullround action). A hunch does not translate as a legal truth, and will not stand up in a court of law. Rather, it is an obvious fact to the Bounty Hunter alone. Finding proof of an assumption would require additional work.

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236 Advanced Classes Perception At 8th level, the Bounty Hunter gains an uncanny perception of his surroundings. If the Bounty Hunter spends a Karma Point, he can as a full-round action sense the vibrations of life an area of 60ft radius. The Bounty Hunter can sense within five feet of where all of the targets are in the area and can determine the base type of life (such as animal, humanoid, plant, or vermin). This ability lasts for the number of rounds equal to the Bounty Hunter’s advanced class levels and is centered on, and moves with, the character. A hidden character or creature still remains hidden from the Bounty Hunter, unless the Bounty Hunter succeeds a Spot check to view the hidden character. Since the Bounty Hunter can sense the life (and knows the general location of where the creature is hidden) the Bounty Hunter receives a +20 to his Spot check.

Locate Target At 10th level, the Bounty Hunter gains the uncanny ability to detect his target when the target is in the general vicinity (1,000 feet of the Bounty Hunter). This ability applies only to the target, and does not reveal attitude, status, or the presence of others around the target.

Daredevil A wise Ghūl once told you, “The only thing to fear is fear itself” and since you’re fearless, no stunt is impossible. You are the unknown stuntman that makes falling from a tall building, swinging on cables, and leaping chasms look easy.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Daredevil, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2 Skills: Concentration 6 ranks, Tumble 6 ranks. Feat: Acrobatic, Endurance, Diehard, and Stuntman.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Daredevil Advanced Class.

Hit Die: 1d10 Karma Points: A Daredevil receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Daredevil’s class skills are: Balance, Climb, Concentration, Demolitions, Escape Artist, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (street), Perform (act), Profession, Ride, Spot, Swim, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Daredevil Advanced Class.

Fearless

A Daredevil gains a +4 morale bonus on Will saves to resist fear effects and on level checks to oppose Intimidate checks.

Kip-Up

A Daredevil of 2nd level or higher can stand up from a prone position as a free action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity.

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At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Daredevil gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Daredevil must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

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The Daredevil Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Daredevil Bonus Feats Acrobatic, Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), Athletic, Awareness, Brawl, Cautious, Dodge, Dodger, Fleet of Foot, Force Stop, Hit the Deck, HtH Fighter, Improved Brawl, Improved Damage Threshold, Improved Knockout Punch, Knockout Punch, Lead Foot, Light Step, Mobility, Nimble, Quick Recovery, Spring Attack, Street Fighting, Stunt Man, Surface Vehicle Operation, Toughness, Vehicle Dodge, Vehicle Expert.

Ref +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Special Fearless Kip-up Bonus feat Karma boost Adrenaline rush (one ability score) Bonus feat Delay damage Adrenaline rush (two ability scores) Bonus feat Damage threshold

Karma Boost

This ability, gained at 4th level, allows a Daredevil to spend 2 Karma Points on a single action in a round. A Daredevil can spend a Karma Point, see the result of the roll, and then decide to spend a second point, as long as he does so before the Overseer reveals the result of the action.

Adrenaline Rush

At 5th level, a Daredevil can temporarily increase one of his physical ability scores (Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution). The Daredevil spends 1 Karma Point and gets to increase the selected ability score by 4 points. The increase lasts for the number of rounds equal to his class level. At the end of the duration, the Daredevil is fatigued for 2d4 rounds. At 8th level, a Daredevil can temporarily increase two physical ability scores. At the end of the duration, the Daredevil is fatigued for 3d4 rounds.

Delay Damage

Once per day, a Daredevil of 7th level or higher can delay the damage dealt by a single attack or effect for the number of rounds equal to his class level.

Damage Threshold

A 10th-level Daredevil increases his massive damage threshold by 3 points. This increase stacks with the increase provided by the Improved Damage Threshold feat.

Desert Ranger The Desert Ranger force is known across the Wastes as being fearsome with tough soldiers and expert survivalists. They serve a variety of purposes, but are primarily a mix of Special Forces and vigilante lawmen, like the Texas Rangers before the Exodus. They primarily concern themselves with keeping law and order in the smaller towns, and making strategic military strikes against enemies of the people, like the large Slaver groups. The Desert Rangers will accept anyone into their ranks as long as that person passes some military and survival tests. Acceptance into the Rangers is a great honor in the Wasteland.

Requirements To qualify to become a Desert Ranger, a character must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +3 Skills: Survival 8 ranks. Feats: Explorer, Pathfinder, Personal Firearms Proficiency, Track.

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238 Advanced Classes Class Information The following information pertains to the Desert Ranger Advanced Class.

Hit Die

Desert Rangers gain 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

The Desert Ranger receives 3 Karma Points plus his Ranger level plus ½ of all other character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills

Desert Ranger Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Endurance Favored Enemy 1 Swift Tracker Favored Enemy 2 Combat Shooting Favored Enemy 3 Camouflage Favored Enemy 4 Adapt Warfare Squad Leader

A Desert Ranger’s class skills are: Balance, Climb, Hide, Jump, Knowledge (current events), Knowledge (tactics), Listen, Move Silently, Navigate, Ride, Spot, Survival, Swim, and Treat Injury.

Skill Points at Each Level: 3 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Desert Ranger Advanced Class.

Endurance

At 1st level, the Desert Ranger gains Endurance as a bonus feat. If the character already has Endurance he instead gains the Die Hard feat.

Favored Enemy

Beginning at 2nd level, a Desert Ranger may choose a particular organization or type of creature as a sworn enemy. The Ranger receives +1 to attack rolls against his Favored Enemy, or a member of an Enemy organization (provided the Ranger knows he is dealing with an Enemy). Additionally the Ranger gains a +2 bonus on Bluff, Listen, Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival checks when using these skills against creatures of this type. At 4th, 6th, Organization Creature and 8th level the Beastmasters Animals 1 Ranger gains Steel Disciples Desert Reapers an additional Children of the Apocalypse Ghūls enemy to Crime Syndicate Geckos choose from. The (any one crime family) Ranger may choose NEMO Humans 2 the same enemy to Raiders Mutations 3 San Francisco (Chi) Trans-Genetic stack the attack and Mutants skill bonuses. Slavers Unity

Vermin 4

1 Animals include radiated animals. 2 Humans cannot choose humans as their favored enemy; they must

pick a human organization instead. 3 Mutations includes the mutated sub-type and other oddities of the wasteland. 4 Vermin include mutated or radiated insects and vermin creatures.

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Swift Tracker: Beginning at 3rd level, a Desert Ranger can move at his normal speed while following tracks

without taking the normal –5 penalty. He takes only a –10 penalty (instead of the normal –20) when moving at up to twice normal speed while tracking.

Combat Shooting

At 5th level, the Ranger can easily assess a target in the heat of battle and aim for a soft spot. The Ranger may, on his action before making an attack roll, choose to subtract a number from all ranged attack rolls during his round and add the same number to all ranged damage rolls. This number may not exceed the Ranger’s base attack bonus. The penalty on attacks and bonus on damage applies until the Ranger’s next turn.

Camouflage At 7th level, a Desert Ranger can use the Hide skill in any sort of natural terrain, urban environment, or Wasteland ruins, even if the terrain does not grant cover or concealment.

Adapted Warfare

At 9th level, the Ranger has mastered the art of fighting strategically in a certain location. The Desert Ranger must choose one of the following locations for his adapted area: Urban (inside a city, but not indoors), Wasteland (in the Wastes), or Indoors (in a building or other enclosed location). When fighting in one of those locations, the Ranger receives a +1 tactical bonus to attack and damage rolls.

Squad Leader At 10th level, the Desert Ranger is able to inspire nearby comrades with his experience and overall leadership in combat. Party members and friendly NPCs within 20’ of the Ranger receive a +1 morale bonus to their attack rolls when fighting alongside a Ranger; these effects stack if more than one Ranger with the Squad Leader ability is fighting alongside the party members.

Dreadnought The Dreadnought is a rare individual that is compared to an unstoppable machine of destruction that wanders the Wasteland looking for victims to inflict pain upon. It is rumored that after the Exodus, secret US military trans-genetic humans that survived, escaped from any remaining captors and wandered into the Wastes.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Dreadnought, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Skill: Intimidate 6 ranks. Feat: Endurance, Improved Damage Threshold, Die Hard. Talents: Damage Reduction (Stoneskin PDR/3).

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Dreadnought Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Dreadnought gains 1d12 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points: A Dreadnought receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

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240 Advanced Classes Class Skills The Dreadnought’s class skills are as follows: Balance, Climb, Concentration, Intimidate, Jump, Profession, Survival, Swim, and Tumble. Skill Points at Each Level: 1 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The Dreadnought

The following class features pertain to the Dreadnought Advanced Class.

Fearless

The Dreadnought immune to fear effects.

Stability

is

Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Will +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Special Fearless, stability, unhindered Ability surge (1/day), steamroller Bonus feat Master defender (+2) Ability surge (2/day), knockdown Bonus feat Master defender (+4) Ability surge (3/day), heavy artillery Bonus feat Master defender (+6)

The Dreadnought is incredibly sure-footed. He gains a +4 stability bonus on all rolls made to resist being tripped, overrun, knocked prone, or pushed back by a bull rush attack.

Unhindered The Dreadnought treats any suit of armor worn as though its armor penalty is 2 better.

Ability Surge At 2nd level, the Dreadnought can temporarily increase his Strength, but at a penalty to Defense. At 5th and 8th level he can use this ability more frequently. The Dreadnought gains a +8 morale bonus to Strength, but takes a –4 penalty to Defense. Activating ability surge is a free action, and the surge lasts for the number of rounds equal to the Dreadnought’s class level. Following the ability surge, the Dreadnought is fatigued for as many rounds as he surged, but may negate this penalty as a free action by spending a Karma Point. The Dreadnought may use the ability surge once per day at 2nd level, twice per day at 5th level, and three times per day at 8th level.

Steamroller

Starting at 2nd level, the Dreadnought does not need to move before making an overrun attempt against an opponent. He also gains a +2 bonus on any trip attack made against an opponent who blocks his overrun attempt.

Bonus Feats At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Dreadnought gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Dreadnought must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Master Defender Starting at 4th level, the Dreadnought becomes especially skilled in defensive fighting. Whenever he fights defensively, or takes the total defense action, he gains a +2 bonus to Defense (in addition to the dodge bonus to Defense gained while fighting defensively or engaged in total defense). The Dreadnought must be wearing medium, heavy, or Powered Armor to gain this bonus. The bonus increases to +4 at 7th level and +6 and 10th level.

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Dreadnought Bonus Feats Adrenaline Rush, Advanced Combat Martial Arts, Advanced Firearms Proficiency, Advanced TwoWeapon Fighting, Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), Armor Proficiency (heavy), Athletic, Better Critical, Bracing, Brawl, Burst Fire, Cleave, Combat Expertise, Combat Martial Arts, Combat Reflexes, Endurance, Frightful Presence, Great Cleave, Improved Brawl, Improved Bull Rush, Improved Combat Martial Arts, Improved Combat Throw, Improved Disarm, Improved Knockout Punch, Improved Trip, Improved TwoWeapon Fighting, Knockout Punch, Mobility, More Critical, Power Attack, Run, Spring Attack, Strafe, Street Fighting, Strong Back, Stone Wall, Sunder, Toughness, Two-Weapon Fighting.

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Knockdown

At 5th level and beyond, whenever the Dreadnought is allowed to apply his Strength modifier to damage, he forces the target of his successful attack to make at a Fortitude save (DC = damage dealt) or be knocked prone by the force of the blow.

Heavy Artillery

Beginning at 8th level, a Dreadnought treats all weapons as one size category smaller for purposes of determining whether or not he can wield them in one hand and if they are considered light weapons.

Explorer The Explorer wanders the Wastes unearthing forgotten ruins from bygone days; seeking out old and lost technology; not to mention, following up on similar rumors. Many an adventurous soul goes down the path of the Explorer.

Requirements To qualify to become an Explorer, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Skills: Knowledge (geography) 6 ranks, Knowledge (history, science, or theology and philosophy) 4 ranks, Search 4 ranks, Survival 6 ranks.

Talent: Aware.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Explorer Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Explorer gains 1d8 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points: The Explorer receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Explorer’s class skills are as follows: Balance, Bluff, Climb, Decipher Script, Disable Device, Gather Information, Handle Animal, Investigate, Jump, Knowledge (geography, history, occult, science, and theology and philosophy), Listen, Navigate, Research, Ride, Search, Sense Motive, Spot, Survival, Swim, and Treat Injury. Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following class features pertain to the Explorer Advanced Class.

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242 Advanced Classes Explorer Lore DC Type of Knowledge Common, known by at least a substantial minority of the 10 local population. Uncommon but available, known by only a few people in 20 the area. 25

Obscure, known by few, hard to come by.

30

Extremely obscure, known by very few, possibly forgotten by most who once knew it, possibly known only by those who do not understand the knowledge’s significance.

Examples A local official’s hobbies and interests; common legends or rumors. The coordinates of a known but uncharted locale; local legends and rumors. The customs of a non-human race, a human culture (like Tribals or a crime family), or a non-civilized Wasteland city. The most likely location of a long-lost military base; knowledge of an experimental weapon or armor.

Explorer Lore An Explorer picks up stray and obscure facts during her adventures. She may make a special Explorer lore check with a bonus equal to her Explorer class level + Intelligence modifier to see whether or not she knows some relevant knowledge about notable people, legendary items, or noteworthy places. If the Explorer has 5 or more ranks in Knowledge (history), she gains a +2 bonus on this check. She may take 10 but cannot take 20 on this check.

Survivalist At 1st level, the Explorer gains the bonus feats Guide and Track.

Resolve

Beginning at 2nd level, an Explorer gains a morale bonus equal to one-half her Explorer class level (rounded down) on saving throws to resist fear effects and Intimidate checks.

Skilled Searcher

The Explorer Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

Fort +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

When actively searching for secret doors or traps, an Explorer of 2nd level or higher gains a bonus on her Search checks equal to one-half her Explorer class level (rounded down).

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Explorer gains a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Explorer must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Trap Sense

Ref +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Explorer lore, Survivalist Resolve, Skilled Searcher Bonus feat Trap sense (+1) Extra step Bonus feat Trap sense (+2) Explorer’s evasion Bonus feat Extra step, trap sense (+3)

Explorer Bonus Feats Action Boy, Advanced Two-Weapon Fighting, Archaic Weapons Proficiency, Attentive, Brawl, Comprehension, Die Hard, Dodge, Dodger, Educated, Endurance, Exotic Firearms Proficiency, Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency, Explorer, Heroic Surge, Improved Feint, Improved Knockout Punch, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, Knockout Punch, Mobility, Nimble, Pathfinder, Quick Pockets, Rad Child, Rad Resistance, Ranger, Renown, Street Fighting, Studious, Track, or Two-Weapon Fighting.

At 4th level, an Explorer gains an intuitive sense that alerts her to danger from traps, giving her a +1 bonus on Reflex saves made to avoid traps, and a +1 dodge bonus to Defense against attacks made by traps. These bonuses rise to +2 at 7th level and +3 at 10th level.

Extra Step

An Explorer of 5th level or higher can spend a Karma Point to take an extra 5-foot step during her turn, as a free action. This extra 5-foot step does not provoke attacks of opportunity. At 10th level, the Explorer can take the extra 5-foot step without spending a Karma Point.

Explorer’s Evasion If an Explorer of 8th level or higher is exposed to any effect that normally allows a character to attempt a Reflex saving throw for half damage, the Explorer suffers no damage if she makes a successful saving throw. If the Explorer already has evasion, she gains improved evasion instead. Improved evasion works similar to evasion, except the Explorer suffers only half damage on a failed saving throw.

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Field Medic The Field Medic is a necessity and rarity in the Wasteland serving as traveling doctors. The Field Medic is generally found traveling with a scouting group from an organization, city, or adventurers to treat the team’s ailments and keep the non-red shirt team members alive.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Field Medic, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2 Occupation: Doctor. Skills: Treat Injury 6 ranks, Spot 6 ranks. Feats: Medic and Surgery.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Field Medic Advanced Class.

Hit Die: 1d8 Karma Points: The Field Medic receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills The Field Medic’s class skills are: Computer Use, Concentration, Craft (pharmaceutical), Diplomacy, Knowledge (medicine, science, street, technology, and theology and philosophy), Listen, Profession (doctor), Research, Spot, and Treat Injury.

Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Field Medic Advanced Class.

Medical Specialist

At 1st level the Field Medic receives a +1 competence bonus on Treat Injury checks. This bonus increases to +2 at 5th level and to +3 at 8th level.

Expert Healer

The Field Medic Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Will +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Medical specialist +1 Expert healer Bonus feat Medical mastery Medical specialist +2 Bonus feat Minor medical miracle Medical specialist +3 Bonus feat Medical miracle

At 2nd level, the Field Medic’s ability to restore hit points with a medical kit or surgery kit, and a successful use of the Treat Injury skill improves. In addition to the normal hit point recovery rate (1d4 for a medical kit, 1d6 per patient’s character level for surgery), the Field Medic restores 1 hit point for every level he has in this advanced class. Field Medic Bonus Feats Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), Cautious, Comprehension, Defensive Martial Arts, Dodge, Dodger, Educated, Healer, Improved Initiative, Living Anatomy, Medical Expert, Personal Firearms Proficiency, Quick Pockets, Rad Child, or Rad Resistance.

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Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Field Medic gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Field Medic must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

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244 Advanced Classes Medical Mastery At 4th level, a Field Medic may take 10 when making a Treat Injury skill check, even if stress and distractions would normally prevent him or her from doing so.

Minor Medical Miracle At 7th level, a Field Medic can save a character reduced to –10 hit points or lower. If the Field Medic is able to administer aid within 3 rounds of the character’s death, he can make a Treat Injury check (DC 30). The Field Medic cannot take 10 or take 20 on this check. If the check succeeds, the dead character can make a Fortitude save (DC 15) to stabilize and be restored to 0 hit points. If the Field Medic fails the skill check or the patient fails the save, the dead character can’t be saved.

Medical Miracle At 10th level, a Field Medic can revive a character reduced to –10 hit points or lower. If the Field Medic is able to administer aid within 3 minutes of the character’s death, he or she can make a Treat Injury check (DC 40). The Field Medic cannot take 10 or take 20. If the check succeeds, the dead character can make a Fortitude save (DC 20) to stabilize and be restored to 0 plus 2d4 hit points. If the Field Medic fails the skill check or the patient fails the Fortitude save, the dead character cannot be restored.

Field Scientist The Field Scientist is a rare find in the Wasteland since only a few cities and organizations have the technology that a scientist needs to accomplish scientific tasks. A Field Scientist is normally found working for a power or organization in the Wastes to further that powers goals.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Field Scientist, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Skills: 6 ranks in either Craft (chemical or electronic), 6 ranks in Knowledge (medicine, nature, science, or technology), and 6 ranks in Research.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Field Scientist Advanced Class.

Hit Die: 1d8 Karma Points: The Field Scientist receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Field Scientist’s class skills are: Computer Use, Craft (chemical, electronic, mechanical, and pharmaceutical), Decipher Script, Demolitions, Disable Device, Investigate, Knowledge (medicine, nature, science, and technology), Navigate, Profession, Research, and Search.

Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modifier.

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Survivor’s Guide v1.5 Class Features The following features pertain to the Field Scientist Advanced Class.

Smart Defense

At 1st level, a Field Scientist applies his Intelligence bonus and his Dexterity bonus to his Defense. Any situation that would deny the Field Scientist his Dexterity bonus to Defense also denies the Intelligence bonus.

Scientific Improvisation

The Field Scientist Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Ref +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Special Smart defense Scientific improvisation Bonus feat Skill mastery Minor breakthrough Bonus feat Smart survival Smart weapon Bonus feat Major breakthrough

At 2nd level, a Field Scientist gains the ability to improvise solutions using common objects and scientific know-how. This ability lets the Field Scientist create objects in a dramatic situation quickly and cheaply, though they do have a limited duration. By spending 1 Karma Point and combining common objects with a Craft check that corresponds to the function desired, the Field Scientist can build a tool or device to deal with any situation. Improvisation Simple

DC 10 15 20 25 30 35 40

Example Mounting a illuminator to a long-arm Modify electronic lockpick Expanding a ammo clip Expanding the range of a walkie-talkie by 50% Reinforcing armor (into MK II version) Harding Power Armor with chemicals Accelerating a Plasma Rifle shot output

Only objects that can normally be used more than once can be improvised.

Electronic devices, special tools, weapons, mechanical devices, and more can be built with scientific improvisation. It takes a Difficult full-round action to make an object with scientific improvisation. The object, when Complex put into use, lasts for the number of rounds equal to the Field Scientist’s class level, or until the end of the current encounter, before it breaks down. The object cannot be repaired. Hard

Field Scientist Bonus Feats Archaic Weapons Proficiency, Attentive, Cautious, Combat Expertise, Comprehension, Educated, Flower Child, Gearhead, Mr. Fixit, Pack Rat, Personal Firearms Proficiency, Point Blank Shot, Quick Pockets, Rad Resistance, Renown, or Studious.

Bonus Feat

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Field Scientist gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Field Scientist must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Skill Mastery

At 4th level, a Field Scientist selects a number of skills from his class list equal to 3 + his Intelligence modifier. When making a skill check using one of these skills, the Field Scientist may take 10 even if stress and distractions would normally prevent him or her from doing so.

Minor Breakthrough

At 5th level, a Field Scientist receives credit for a minor scientific breakthrough that earns him recognition of his peers. The Field Scientist chooses one of the following Knowledge skills: medicine, science, or technology. When dealing with others with at least 1 rank in the same Knowledge skill, the Field Scientist gains a +2 bonus on Diplomacy skill checks. The Field Scientist also gains +5% reputation (fame) to one reputation category of his choice (this is the organization or Wasteland civilization he shared the breakthrough with) and 1000 coin.

Smart Survival A Field Scientist of 7th level or higher can spend 1 Karma Point to reduce the damage dealt by a single attack or effect by 5 points.

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246 Advanced Classes Smart Weapon At 8th level, the Field Scientist selects one weapon that he is proficient in and can use with one hand. With the selected weapon, the Field Scientist can use his or her Intelligence modifier instead of Strength or Dexterity modifier on attack rolls.

Major Breakthrough

At 10th level, the Field Scientist gains a +2 bonus on Diplomacy skill checks when dealing with individuals who have at least 1 rank in any of the following Knowledge skills: medicine, science, or technology. This bonus stacks with the bonus provided by the minor breakthrough ability. The Field Scientist also gains +10% reputation (fame) to one reputation category of his choice (this is the organization or Wasteland civilization he shared the breakthrough with) and 5000 coin.

Gunslinger The Gunslinger is that lone, unnamed gunman of the spaghetti Wasteland practicing his trade to be the quickest and not the dead. Gunslingers are specialist in the art of firearm combat and very popular in the Wasteland being found in almost every settlement.

Requirements To qualify to become a Gunslinger, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2 Feat: Personal Firearms Proficiency.

Class Information

Hit Die: 1d10

Karma Points: The Gunslinger receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class. Class Skills

The Gunslinger’s class skills are: Bluff, Demolitions, Escape Artist, Gamble, Intimidate, Knowledge (street, tactics, and underworld), Move Silently, Profession, Ride, Sleight of Hand, Spot, Survival, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier. The Gunslinger Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

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BAB +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

Fort +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Ref +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Close combat shot Weapon focus Bonus feat Defensive position Lightning shot Bonus feat Sharp-shooting Greater weapon focus Bonus feat Bullseye

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Class Features The following features pertain to the Gunslinger Advanced Class.

Close Combat Shot

At 1st level, a Gunslinger gains the ability to make a ranged attack with a Medium-size or smaller firearm while in a threatened area without provoking an attack of opportunity.

Weapon Focus

At 2nd level, a Gunslinger gains the Weapon Focus feat and must choose a specific personal firearm in which he is proficient.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Gunslinger gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Gunslinger must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Defensive Position Starting at 4th level, the Gunslinger gains an additional +2 cover bonus to Defense and an additional +2 cover bonus on Reflex saves whenever he or she has one-quarter, one-half, three-quarters, or nine-tenths cover.

Gunslinger Bonus Feats Advanced Firearms Proficiency, Advanced TwoWeapon Fighting, Bonus Ranged Damage, Burst Fire, Dead Aim, Double Tap, Far Shot, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, Precise Shot, Quick Draw, Quick Reload, Shot on the Run, Skip Shot, Strafe, Two-Weapon Fighting.

Lightning Shot

Starting at 5th level, a Gunslinger can make a flurry of ranged attacks with a personal firearm at the expense of accuracy. With a lightning shot, the Gunslinger may make one extra ranged attack with a personal firearm in a round at his or her highest base attack bonus. This attack, and each other attack, made in the round take a –2 penalty. This ability can only be used when taking the full attack action. The penalty applies to all attacks for one full round, including attacks of opportunity.

Sharp-Shooting

At 7th level, if the Gunslinger uses a personal firearm to attack a target, the cover bonus to the target’s Defense for one-quarter, one-half, three-quarters, or nine-tenths cover is reduced by 2.

Greater Weapon Focus

At 8th level, a Gunslinger receives a +1 competence bonus on attack rolls made with the firearm selected for the Weapon Focus ability at 2nd level. This bonus stacks with the earlier bonus.

Bullseye At 10th level, a Gunslinger becomes so adept at using the firearm to which he or she has applied Weapon Focus and Greater Weapon Focus that the gunslinger’s attacks with that firearm can deal extra damage. With a successful attack, before damage is rolled, the Gunslinger can spend 1 Karma Point to deal +3d6 points of damage.

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Harvester Ever have that problem when stuff starts growing on you? We’re just not talking fungus here either! The best conclusion to come to is either you’re pushing up daisies or you’re a Ghūl with funky growth issues. Being a victim of the Trans-Genetic Warrior Project, your skin and muscles are so grainy that moss and plants have started to grow on your body. With the proper discipline and will power, you can produce and harvest the fruits of your labor.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Harvester, a character must meet the following requirements:

Race: Ghūl Base Will Save: +5 Feats: Iron Will Skills: Knowledge (nature) 6 ranks

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Harvester Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Harvester gains 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Harvester receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

Harvester class skills are: Concentration, Climb, Craft (pharmaceutical), Hide, Knowledge (nature and theology and philosophy), Listen, Search, Spot, and Swim.

Skill Points at Each Level: 5 + Int modifier

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Harvester Advanced Class.

Harvester

Fungus

Level 1 2 3 4 5

1st

At level, the Harvester develops a fungus problem. The fungus grows in several light layers all over the Ghūl’s body granting him natural armor much like bark from a tree. The Harvester gains 1 points of Physical Damage Reduction (PDR 1) from this thick fungus.

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2

Fort +0 +1 +1 +1 +2

Ref +0 +1 +1 +1 +2

Will +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3

Special Fungus Green Thumb Bonsai Way of the Fruit Shape Fruit

Green Thumb At 2nd level, the Harvester develops a unique empathy with plants. When tending garden, the plants grow twice as fast and twice as big as the normal variety. If the Harvester spends more than 2 hours tending garden, he hears the whispers of the plants, and can become one with nature, attaining knowledge of the surrounding territory. The Harvester instantly gains knowledge of as many as three facts from among the

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following subjects: the ground or terrain, plants, minerals, bodies of water, people, general animal population, presence of woodland creatures, presence of powerful unnatural creatures, or even the general state of the natural setting.

Bonsai At 3rd level, the Harvester’s fungus issue is not half of his problems. A small oriental tree, known as the bonsai by the San Francisco Chi, has grown overnight on the torso or head of the Ghūl. This small bonsai provides the Ghūl with extra nutrients that were lost during his transformation from human to Ghūl. These nutrients bestow a +4 Fortitude save against Disease and Poison effects. Should the bonsai tree be destroyed, another will spring up from its roots 3 months later. A bonsai tree has 20 hit points, a hardness of 5, and the Defense of the Harvester that must be targeted (-6 to attack rolls) in order to be hit. D% 01-04 05-08 09-12 13-16 17-20 21-24 25-28 29-32 33-36 37-40 41-44 45-48 49-52 53-56 57-60 61-64 65-68 69-72 73-76 77-80 81-84 85-88 89-92 93-96 97-100

Way of the Fruit’s Benefit +2 chemical bonus to Strength for 12 hours +2 chemical bonus to Dexterity for 12 hours +2 chemical bonus to Constitution for 12 hours +2 chemical bonus to Intelligence for 12 hours +2 chemical bonus to Wisdom for 12 hours +2 chemical bonus to Charisma for 12 hours Yuk, its rotten, become Nauseated for 1 hour +4 chemical bonus to Fortitude saves for 12 hours +4 chemical bonus to Will saves for 12 hours Cures Chemical Addiction effects Cures Disease Cures all Radiation effects No beneficial effects, but very tasty, umm yummy. Heals 1d4 points of damage Heals 1d8+1 points of damage Heals 2d8+3 points of damage Heals 3d8+5 points of damage No beneficial effects, but very tasty, umm yummy. Yuk, its rotten, become Nauseated for 2 hour Removes 200 RADs of Radiation Removes any Chemical after effects Removes any Poison effects Yuk, its rotten, become Nauseated for 3 hour No beneficial effects, but very tasty, umm yummy. Re-roll twice ignoring this result if rolled again

Shape DC 18 18 18 18 18 18 8 20 20 35 35 30 8 12 15 18 23 8 12 23 25 25 16 8 N/A

Way of the Fruit At 4th level, the Harvester’s bonsai tree begins to produce fruit. The Harvester grows a single piece of fruit once every 10 days that is ripe for the picking. The fruit is lumpy and green, about 3 inches in diameter, and is very tasty. The life of a ripe or picked fruit is 5 days before spoiling. When eaten, the fruit bestows strange random properties as denoted on the chart.

Shape Fruit

At 5th level, the Harvester can attempt to shape his fruit into a specific benefit instead of a random ability. The Harvester may choose a property from the table above and attempt to shape the fruit into that ability by making a successful Will saving throw. Failing the save means that the fruit is random.

Infiltrator An Infiltrator is a master of deception and stealth, a spy that has honed his art of blending in with a particular crowd of individuals to gather an item of note or knowledge—and sometimes, even to eliminate a mark. An Infiltrator is normally part of a crime syndicate, or the thieves’ underground. They are rarely found freelancing, since the underworld does not tolerate freelancer working in their areas of influence.

Requirements

To qualify to become an Infiltrator, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2 Skills: Hide 6 ranks, Move Silently 6 ranks. Feat: Ghost or Stealthy

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250 Advanced Classes Class Information The following information pertains to the Infiltrator Advanced Class.

Hit Die: 1d8 Karma

Points: The Infiltrator receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class. Class Skills The Infiltrator’s class skills are: Balance, Climb, Disable Device, Disguise, Escape Artist, Hide, Investigate, Jump, Knowledge (civics, street, and underworld), Listen, Move Silently, Profession, Search, Sleight of Hand, Spot, and Tumble.

Infiltrator

Skill Points at Each Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Infiltrator Advanced Class.

Sweep

An Infiltrator knows how to size up an area and get the lay of the land in a single sweep of his or her eyes. This sweep provides a +4 circ*mstance bonus on Spot checks and covers an area out to 30 feet away from the Infiltrator. The Infiltrator can use this bonus at the start of an encounter.

The Infiltrator Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Ref +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Sweep Improvised implements Bonus feat Improved evasion Skill mastery Bonus feat Improvised weapon damage Improved sweep Bonus feat Without a trace

Anything not concealed can be spotted in a sweep with a successful check (DC 10). The DC for concealed or less obvious threats is equal to their Hide check result.

Improvised Implements

At 2nd level, an Infiltrator no longer takes a –4 penalty when wielding an improvised weapon. Also, the Infiltrator is able to make do without proper equipment in certain circ*mstances: the Infiltrator no longer takes a –4 penalty when using the Climb and Disable Device skills without the proper tools.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Infiltrator gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Infiltrator must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

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Infiltrator Bonus Feats Acrobatic, Alertness, Armor Proficiency (light), Athletic, Attentive, Awareness, Brawl, Cautious, Defensive Martial Arts, Dodge, Dodger, Elusive Target, Fleet of Foot, Meticulous, Mobility, Nimble, Renown, Run, Stealthy.

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Improved Evasion

If an Infiltrator of 4th level or higher is exposed to any effect that normally allows a character to attempt a Reflex saving throw for half damage, the Infiltrator suffers no damage if he or she makes a successful saving throw and only half damage on a failed save. Improved evasion can only be used when wearing light armor or no armor. For an Infiltrator who does not have evasion (see the talent Description), improved evasion counts as evasion for the purpose of meeting the prerequisites on the talent tree.

Skill Mastery

At 5th level, an Infiltrator selects a number of skills from his or her class list equal to 3 + his or her Intelligence modifier. When making a check using one of these skills, the Infiltrator may take 10 even if stress and distractions would normally prevent him or her from so doing.

Improvised Weapon Damage At 7th level, an Infiltrator’s attacks with improvised weapons deal more damage. The Infiltrator treats an improvised weapon as one size category larger than it is for the purpose of determining the damage it deals.

Improved Sweep At 8th level, an Infiltrator’s ability to get the lay of the land improves. Now the Infiltrator not only spots potential perils with a successful check, he or she can determine the relative strength of these dangers. A successful check relates the danger’s strength compared to the Infiltrator: stronger (higher level or Hit Dice), on par (same level or HD), or weaker (lower level or HD).

Without a Trace At 10th level, when an Infiltrator uses any of the following skills: Balance, Climb, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Hide, Move Silently, and Sleight of Hand, those using Investigate, Listen, Search, or Spot to detect the Infiltrator’s activity, take a –4 penalty.

Made Man A Made Man is someone who has become a trusted member of an organized crime syndicate. The Made Man is considered above suspicion and completely trustworthy to all members of the gang; and, a rival gang’s killing of a Made Man is considered the equivalent of killing a family member, and is therefore a declaration of war. Although women can technically become “made,” the sexist nature of most organized crime syndicates prevents this from happening. “Made” characters are at the beck and call of their gang; it is not simply a matter of a job, it is a matter of honor and family that when the gang comes a’knocking, the Made Man is ready to grab his gun and start rocking (basically doing whatever is asked). Made Men who refuse the gang typically end up in shallow graves in short order.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Made Man, a character must meet the following requirements:

Background/Occupation:

Background: Gangster or Occupation: Wiseguy.

Base Attack Bonus: +5 Reputation (crime syndicate) 50% Special: Saving the life of the head of the family, or several family members.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Made Man Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Made Man gains 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

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252 Advanced Classes Karma Points A Made Man receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

Made Man Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Street Cred +2 Bonus Feat Sneak Attack +1d6, Soldier Magnetic Personality Street Cred +4 Bonus Feat, Sneak Attack +2d6 Connected Respected Sneak Attack +3d6, Street Cred +6 Bonus Feat, Right-Hand of the Devil

The Made Man class skills are: Bluff, Demolitions, Diplomacy, Disable Device, Disguise, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Hide, Intimidate, Knowledge (civics, street, tactics, and underworld), Listen, Move Silently, Sense Motive, Search, Sleight of Hand, Spot, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Made Man Advanced Class.

Street Cred At 1st level, a Made Man’s status in the crime syndicate grants him bonuses when dealing with other members of the syndicate and others familiar with the organization. The Made Man gains a +2 reputation bonus to Diplomacy, Intimidate, Investigate, and Gather Information checks when dealing with members of his family, or civilians familiar with the Made Man’s status. At 5th level this bonus increases to +4, and at 9th level to +6.

Bonus Feats At 2nd, 6th, and 10th levels a Made Man may choose a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Made Man must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it. Made Man Bonus Feats Action Boy, Advanced Firearms Proficiency, Awareness, Blind Fight, Big Guns, Brawl, Burst Fire, Cleave, Combat Expertise, Combat Reflexes, Demolition Expert, Die Hard, Earlier Sequence, Endurance, Ghost, Great Cleave, Heroic Surge, Improved Brawl, Improved Knockout Punch, Improved Feint, Improved Damage Threshold, Knockout Punch, Power Attack, Quick Draw, Quick Reload, Strafe, Street Fighting, Thief, Toughness, Weapon Finesse, or Weapon Focus.

Sneak Attack

At 3rd level, a Made Man gains the sneak attack ability, dealing an extra 1d6 points of damage to targets that are caught flat-footed, denied their Dexterity, or flanked with melee attacks. This attack also applies to range attacks within 30 feet of a target that is also caught flat-footed or denied their Dexterity. At 6th level the damage increases to 2d6 and again at 9th level to 3d6.

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Soldier

At 3rd level, a Made Man is one of the foremost soldiers in the family and receives benefits accordingly. The family will provide the Made Man with any personal firearm and ammunition of a scarcity rating of common, uncommon, or infrequent. Additionally, the Made Man will be fitted with a Concealed Mesh Suit for armor.

Magnetic Personality

At 4th level, a Made Man gains the Magnetic Personality as a bonus feat and may gain a cohort and followers.

Connected

At 7th level, the Made Man is connected and has developed many contacts. The character can call in a favor to the boss or an associate to gain a +10 circ*mstance bonus to Gather Information or Research skill check. Additionally, the character can opt to buy a Rare or Very Rare item at a discounted rate of 50% from a syndicate merchant (though, cannot Barter the price down further). This favor can be called on once per month.

Respected

At 8th level, the Made Man becomes respected widely by the community and his family influenced areas. He gains the benefits of free lodging, food, prostitutes, and has access to 500 trade coins of the community wealth (either in trade or paper). The latter is an allowance collectable once per month.

Right Hand of the Devil At 10th level, the Made Man becomes known as the Main Man, the right hand of the Don. Word spreads like wildfire in the underworld of the Wasteland, and the word is that you are the enforcer of the family. There is a percent chance equal to your fame (your crime syndicate family) plus character level that enforcers from other crime syndicates, gang members, and slavers recognize you and either flee the scene or pay homage (this is up to the Overseer to determine).

Martial Artist Ah, Grasshopper… You have studied under a master of the Chi, learning the secrets of Kung Fu fighting. Woo-Ha, with roundhouse kicks and karate chops bodies will hit the floor.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Martial Artist, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Background/Talents: Chi background or all of the martial arts talents (Judo, Karate, and Kendo)

Base Attack Bonus: +3 Skill: Jump 3 ranks. Feats: Combat Martial Arts, Defensive Martial Arts.

Class Information Hit Die: 1d8

Karma Points

A Marital Artist receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

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254 Advanced Classes Class Skills The Martial Artist’s class skills are: Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (street, occult, and theology and philosophy), Move Silently, Perform (dance), Profession, Spot, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Martial Artist Advanced Class.

Living Weapon The Martial Artist attacks with either fist interchangeably, or even with elbows, knees, and feet. This means that the Martial Artist may even make unarmed strikes when his or her hands are full, and there is no such thing as an off-hand attack for a Martial Artist striking unarmed.

The Martial Artist Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Special Living weapon 1d6 Flying kick Bonus feat Living weapon 1d8 Iron fist (one attack) Bonus feat Flurry of blows Living weapon 1d10 Bonus feat Iron fist (all attacks)

The Martial Artist also deals more damage with unarmed strikes. At 1st level, the Martial Artist deals 1d6 points of damage with an unarmed strike. At 4th level, damage increases to 1d8. At 8th level, it increases to 1d10. This is an increase to Combat Martial Arts damage; this has no effect on Brawl. This ability stacks with the Martial Arts Talent (Karate) increasing the damage die by the talent rank from 1d6 to 2d4, 1d8 to 2d6, and 1d10 to 2d8.

Flying Kick

Starting at 2nd level, a Martial Artist can use a charge to deliver a devastating flying kick to an opponent. At the end of this charge, the Martial Artist adds his Martial Artist class level as a bonus to the damage he deals with an unarmed strike.

Bonus Feats At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Martial Artist gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Martial Artist must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Iron Fist

Martial Artist Bonus Feats Acrobatic, Adrenaline Rush, Advanced Combat Martial Arts, Archaic Weapons Proficiency, Combat Reflexes, Combat Throw, Dodge, Dodger, Earlier Sequence, Elusive Target, Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency, Improved Combat Throw, Improved Combat Martial Arts, Improved Initiate, Karma Beacon, Presence, Quick Recovery, Stunt Man, Stonewall, Unbalance Opponent..

At 5th level, a Martial Artist gains the ability to spend 1 Karma Point to increase the damage he deals to a single opponent with a single unarmed strike. The Martial Artist declares the use of the Karma Point after making a successful unarmed strike. The result of the Karma Point roll is added to the damage roll for that attack.

At 10th level, this ability improves. The Martial Artist now adds the result of the Karma Point roll to all successful attacks he makes in a round.

Flurry of Blows

At 7th level, a Martial Artist gains the ability to strike with a flurry of blows at the expense of accuracy. The Martial Artist must be unarmored to use this talent, and he must make unarmed strikes to gain the benefit. With a flurry of blows, the Martial Artist may make one extra attack in a round at his or her highest base attack bonus. This attack, and each other attack made in the round, takes a –2 penalty. This ability can only be used when taking the full attack action. The penalty applies to all attacks for one full round, including attacks of opportunity.

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Master Trader You have refined the art of bartering and making deals to the point where others eat out of your hand— sometimes literally. You know the fastest routes through which you can take caravans, the best ways of motivating guards, and your knowledge of finance would make even the drollest accountant wince. The world is yours, baby, yeah!

Requirements

To qualify to become a Master Trader, a character must meet the following requirements:

Skills: Barter 5 ranks, Bluff 5 ranks, and Diplomacy 5 ranks Feats: Negotiator Talent: Skill Emphasis (Barter)

Class Information The following information pertains to the Master Trader Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Master Trader gains 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Master Trader receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Master Trader’s class skills are: Barter, Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Knowledge (civic, street, and underworld), Listen, Navigate, Profession (merchant), Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival.

Skill Points at Each Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Master Trader Advanced Class.

Caravan Handling

Master Trader Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Ref +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

At 1st level, the Master Trader has experienced the trade routes of the Wastes and has learned how to handle his wares and caravan when traveling. The Master Trader gains Handle Animal (Bison) as a class skill and can use this skill untrained. Not all merchants deal with caravans.

Will +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Caravan Handling, Trade Assets Deal Maker 5%, Snake Oil Salesman Caravan Navigation Deal Maker 10%, Superior Barterer Trade Assets, Proper Motivation Deal Maker 15% Assistant Deal Maker 20%, Superior Barterer Deal Shark, Trade Assets Deal Maker 25%, Everyone has a Price

Trade Assets

At 1st level, the Master Trader barters 500 Coins worth of trade assets of common and uncommon goods to sell at his bazaar. At 5th level the Trader receives 1000 Coins worth of trade assets with infrequent goods. At 9th level the Trader receives 2500 Coins worth of trade assets with an occasional rare goods.

Deal Maker

The Master Trader’s ability to read his business associates’ like a book allows him to get discounts normal traders cannot. On a successful opposed Barter roll, the Master Trader gets a bonus discount on goods he is buying– or a premium on goods he is selling –according to his Deal Maker ability. This discount or bonus

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256 Advanced Classes adds the successful Barter skill check. The Master Trader receives a bonus of 5% at 2nd level, 10% at 4th level, 15% at 6th level, 20% at 8th level, and 25% at 10th level. Example: Weston, a 4th level Defensive Class/ 4th level Master Trader, bartering with a merchant makes an opposed Barter skill check and beats the merchant’s check by 15. Weston can now buy goods at a 40% discount (30% from barter + 10% from Master Trader) or sell goods at a 40% higher price (again the original sell value is ½ of the original cost value).

Snake Oil Salesman At 2nd level, the Master Trader masters the art of tricking customers into buying bogus products and junk items as the real deal. The Master Trader gains a +2 Bluff when deceiving a custom with garbage items.

Caravan Navigation At 3rd level, the Master Trader’s experience with navigating the Wastes gives him the ability to find little shortcuts unknown to all but the most stalwart rangers. A Master Trader with this ability takes 25% less time when traveling through the Wastes (for example, a 4-day journey would only take 3 days.)

Superior Barterer

At 4th level, the Master Trader has mastered the art of Bartering and gains a +2 bonus to Barter and Bluff skill checks. At 8th level this ability increases to +4.

Proper Motivation Very little moves a person like the motivation of money. At 5 th level, a Master Trader can take a full round action to motivate up to 10 + his Charisma modifier in Hit Dice of characters or NPCs by explaining the vast rewards that await them upon the successful completion of their task (no save). Characters properly motivated receive +1 to their attack rolls. Whether or not these rewards actually exist is a moot point, although the Master Trader may have to follow through on his promises at some point—especially if he uses this trick over and over on the same group. This motivation lasts the number of rounds equal to the level of the Master Trader.

Assistant

At 7th level, the Master Trader acquires a financial Assistant follower. This NPC is a trusted confidant and helps the Master Trader keep the smaller aspects of his business running smoothly, freeing the Master Trader for more important and higher-level matters. The Assistant is 6 minus the character’s Charisma modifier in levels lower than the character and is created and run by the Master Trader character. The Assistant receives 22 points to purchase ability scores from the planned generation rules in Chapter 1. He can only take levels in the Defensive Class and Master Trader class, and must have the Merchant Occupation: other than this, it is up to the player to determine the rest of the genetic makeup of the Assistant. If the Assistant dies or becomes a slave, the Master Trader receives a –25% penalty to Reputation (fame) in all trade cities. As long as the Assistant remains alive and accompanies the Master Trader, however, the Master Trader receives a +2 competence bonus to his Barter rolls. If the Master Trader loses his Assistant either through death or slavery, the Master Trader, may acquire a second Assistant, with the same build rules as above. Should this Assistant be lost, no other Assistants will be willing to work with the Master Trader.

Deal Shark At 9th level, the Master Trader has become famous for his ability to cut deals. The Master Trader may stack his ranks of Intimidation skill with his Barter skill ranks when making Barter checks.

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Everyone has a Price

At 10th level, the Master Trader has made a deal with the devil. The Master Trader uses his serpent tongue to convince a buyer that the product he is selling is the product buyer needs and everyone has a price. The Master Trader can convince the target to buy his product with a successful persuasion check. The Master Trader rolls a d20 plus his Master Trader levels and CHR modifier against the target’s NPC level and Sense Motive. If the Trader beats his target, then he convinces the target to buy the item, however this item is still subject to opposed Barter rolls for pricing.

Mutant Berserker Embrace your anger, and go wild my trans-mutant friend. A Mutant Berserker has embraced the fact that he was made for war and destruction. His adrenaline and blood pumps to blinding levels and he becomes an unstoppable killing machine.

Requirements To qualify to become a Mutant Berserker, a character must meet the following requirements:

Race: Trans-Genetic Mutant Base Attack Bonus: +5 Feats: Endurance, Improved Damage Threshold, Power Attack, and Weapon Focus (any one melee weapon or unarmed).

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Mutant Berserker Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Mutant Berserker gains 1d12 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Mutant Berserker receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

Mutant Berserker class skills are: Climb, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (tactics), Survival, and Swim.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

Mutant Berserker Level 1 2 3 4 5

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Ref +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2

Special Adrenaline Rush +2, DR +1 (DR 4) Destructive Rage Adrenaline Rush +4, DR +2 (DR 5) Berserk Frenzy Adrenaline Rush +6, DR +3 (DR 6)

The following features pertain to the Mutant Berserker Advanced Class.

Adrenaline Rush

At 1st level, a Mutant Berserker can boost his adrenaline increasing blood flow, gaining a +2 morale bonus to Strength, Dexterity, and Constitution for the number of rounds equal to his newly modified Constitution bonus plus 3. This ability can be used the number of times per day equal to the character’s Mutant Berserker level. After the effects of the Adrenaline Rush wears off the Mutant Berserker is fatigued for 1 hour and cannot use another Rush until this time passes. At 3 rd level the ability bonus from the Adrenaline Rush increases to +4 and at 5th level +6.

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258 Advanced Classes Improved Damage Reduction At 1st level, a Mutant Berserker’s DR improves by 1 point (for a total of 4 DR). The DR increases again at 3 rd (for a total of 5 DR) and again at 5th level (for a total of 6 DR) by 1 point.

Destructive Rage At 2nd level, a Mutant Berserker can enter into an Adrenaline Rush that allows him, in addition to the normal bonuses from the rush, to ignore 5 DR or 10 points of an object’s hardness on success melee attack rolls. A Destructive Rage lasts for the number of rounds equal to Mutant Berserker’s level plus 3.

Berserk Frenzy

At 4th level, a Mutant Berserker can enter into an Adrenaline Rush that allows him, in addition to the normal bonuses from the rush, to deal double STR damage on all melee attacks. This frenzy lasts for a number of rounds equal to Mutant Berserker’s level plus 3.

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Mutant Commando Before the Exodus, you received advanced training in the Trans-Genetic Warrior Project. Now that training is coming to use.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Mutant Commando, a character must meet the following requirements:

Race: Trans-Genetic Mutant Ability Score: Intelligence 12+ Base Attack Bonus: +5 Feats: Advanced Firearm Proficiency, Personal Firearm Proficiency, Energy Weapon Proficiency, Heavy Weapon Proficiency, Point Blank Shot, Power Attack, Precise Shot and Weapon Focus (one melee weapon).

Class Information The following information pertains to the Mutant Commando Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Mutant Commando gains 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

The Mutant Commando receives 3 Karma Points plus his Mutant Commando level plus ½ of any other character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills

Mutant Commando class skills are: Balance, Climb, Demolitions, Disable Device, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Knowledge (tactics), Listen, Move Silently, Navigate, Search, Spot, Survival, Swim, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Mutant Commando Advanced Class.

Improved Stealth At 1st level, the Mutant Commando becomes the shadows and moves like a leaf on the wind. The Commando receives a +4 competence bonus to Hide and Move Silently skill checks. In dimly illuminated areas, this bonus doubles and becomes +8.

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Mutant Commando Level 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +10/+5

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Special Improved Stealth Silent Death +1d6 Bonus Feat Leave No Enemy Alive Bonus Feat Silent Death +2d6 Bonus Feat Leave No Enemy Alive II Bonus Feat Death Strike, Silent Death +3d6

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260 Advanced Classes Silent Death At 2nd level, the Mutant Commando gains the Sneak Attack ability dealing an extra +1d6 points of damage to targets that are caught flat-footed, denied their Dexterity, or flanked with melee attacks only. At 6 th level the damage increases to +2d6 and again at 10th level to +3d6.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th level, a Mutant Commando can choose a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Mutant Commando must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Leave No Enemy Alive

Mutant Commando Bonus Feats Adrenaline Rush, Better Criticals, Bonus Ranged Damage, Burst Fire, Combat Reflexes, Dead Aim, Dodge, Double Tap, Endurance, Far Shot, Great Fortitude, Heroic Surge, Improved Damage Threshold, Improved Grapple, Improved Overrun, Lightning Reflexes, Living Anatomy, Mobility, Pyromaniac, Shot on the Run, Strafe, Quick Reload, Run, Stealthy, Toughness, Track, and Weapon Focus.

At 4th level, the Mutant Commando has become a master of delivering a killing strike to a weakened enemy. Any time the Commando delivers a wound in a melee strike that drops an enemy below zero hit points, he may make a free coup de grace attack against that enemy that provokes an attack of opportunity. If the Commando is struck during the attack of opportunity the coup de grace fails.

Leave No Enemy Alive II

At 8th level, the Mutant Commando has mastered the killing strike of a weakened enemy. Any time the Commando delivers a wound in a melee strike that drops an enemy below zero hit points, he may make a free coup de grace attack against that enemy that does not provokes an attack of opportunity.

Death Strike At 10th level, all of the Mutant Commando attacks critical threat range increases by +1, this ability stacks with the Better Critical and the More Critical feats.

Prizefighter You’re a contender. Whether you have mastered the sweet science of boxing or another less honorable form of prizefighting, you have taken your skills and honed them to the point where you routinely fight in the ring for prizes. Perhaps you are a slave who has become a gladiator or maybe you are a person who uses his talents to get rich. Either way, you have made unarmed or melee combat your calling, and know many fighting techniques most people do not.

Requirements To qualify to become a Prizefighter, a character must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +3 Talent: Strong Attack Feats: Power Attack, Brawl, Street Fighting, and Toughness.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Prizefighter Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Prizefighter gains 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Prize Fighter receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

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Class Skills

Prizefighters class skills are: Climb, Concentration, Gamble, Intimidate, Jump, Sense Motive, Spot, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Prizefighter Advanced Class.

Knockout Punch

At 1st level, a Prizefighter receives the Knockout Punch feat as a bonus feat.

Prizefighter Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5

+1 +2 +3 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1

+1 +1 +2 +2 +3

Knockout Punch, Taunt Improved Knockout Punch, HtH Talent Whirlwind Attack, Improved Taunt Contender, Work the Crowd Finishing Blow, HtH Talent

Taunt

At 1st level, a Prizefighter learns how to taunt an opponent. The net effect of taunting is to throw an opponent off-rhythm; when successful, the Prizefighter receives a +2 modifier to his attack bonus for the duration of the fight. Taunting is a full round action, and the opponent gets a Will save (DC 10+ the Prizefighter’s Level and Charisma modifier) to avoid the effects of the taunt. Taunt may only be used once per opponent in any combat, and does not incur an attack of opportunity.

HtH Talent At 2nd and 5th level, the Prizefighter receives a bonus Hand to Hand Talent.

Improved Knockout Punch

At 2nd level, the Prizefighter receives the Improved Knockout Punch feat as a bonus feat.

Improved Taunt

At 3rd level, a Prizefighter learns how to taunt his opponent through intimidation. The net effect of this taunting is to infuriate the opponent; when successful, the Prizefighter receives a +4 modifier to his attack bonus for the duration of the fight. Taunting is a full round action, and the opponent gets a Will save (DC 10 + the Prizefighter’s Level + ranks of Intimidate + Charisma modifier) to avoid the effects of the taunt. Taunt may only be used once per opponent in any combat, and does not incur an attack of opportunity.

Whirlwind Attack

At 3rd level, the Prizefighter receives the Whirlwind Attack feat as a bonus feat.

Contender

At 4th level, the Prizefighter name becomes known in the Wasteland fighting circuit. Once per month, the Prizefighter is called upon to defend his title (if he has one), or challenge another. He must spend one full day in a local town preparing for, and fighting his fight. For doing this, he gains an income of 100 coins times the opponent’s level upon winning the challenge or 25 coins times opponent’s level the for losing. (Overseers are encouraged to expound upon this skill, perhaps creating whole boxing circuits for the character to become involved in).

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262 Advanced Classes Work the Crowd At 4th level, the Prizefighter knows how to work a crowd during a fight. Through a combination of gestures, threats, and insults the Prizefighter can energize the crowd to support him in the fight, giving him an edge against an opponent. To use the Work the Crowd ability, there must be at least 20 spectators watching the fight; these spectators cannot be involved as combatants on either side. Working the Crowd is a full round action, and requires an Intimidate check (DC = 10+ opponent’s level, for multiple opponents add their levels together). Working the Crowd does incur an attack of opportunity.

Finishing Blow

At 5th level, a Prizefighter has learned when his opponents are close to being defeated and knows how to finish them in a final stunning blow. When his opponent is at one-quarter of his total hit points, the Prizefighter gets a Spot check (free action, DC = 10 + opponent’s level) to identify an opponent is nearly defeated. The Prizefighter may make a Finishing Blow as his next attack; a Finishing Blow is a full round attack action. A successful hit means the opponent has suffered a Finishing Blow. A Finishing Blow is a confirmed critical hit and stuns the opponent if the opponent is not knocked out. If the opponent remains conscious, he must make a Fortitude save (DC = damage dealt) to avoid being stunned for 1 round. If the opponent fails the save, he is stunned for one round.

Rigger The Wasteland is filled with broken and malfunctioning junk. This is where a Rigger excels, salvaging workable parts and making use of them later. Basically, give a Rigger some junk pieces and a malfunctioning piece of machinery, and a short time later the machine is working (well temporary anyways).

Requirements

To qualify to become a Rigger, a character must meet the following requirements:

Skills: Craft (mechanical) 5 ranks, Knowledge (science or technology) 5 ranks, and Repair 5 ranks Feats: Gearhead and Mr. Fixit.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Rigger Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Rigger gains 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Rigger receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class. Rigger

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Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

+0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Improvised Tools, Jury-Rig Builder, Rig Firearm (Hand Guns and Long Arms) Jury-Rig +2 Rig Vehicle Rig Firearm (Heavy Guns) Jury-Rig +4, Advanced Rigging Persuade Malfunctioning Device Rig Technological Device Jury-Rig +6, Rig Firearm (Energy Weapons) Superior Rigging

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Class Skills

Rigger class skills are: Computer Use, Concentration, Craft (electronic), Craft (mechanical), Knowledge (physical science: engineering), Knowledge (technology), Repair, Spot, and Search.

Skill Points at Each Level: 5 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Rigger Advanced Class.

Improvised Tools

At 1st level, the Rigger can improvise a tool for Repair checks and does not suffer the –4 penalty from not having right tool for the job.

Jury-Rig At 1st level, a Rigger can use the “jury-rig” application of the Repair skill without penalty to the DC. At the 3rd level the Rigger gains a +2 skilled bonus to Jury-Rigging. This bonus increases again by another +2 at 6th and at 9th level.

Rig Firearm

At 2nd level, the Rigger can jury-rig a broken Firearm (Hand Guns and Long Arms) to temporary work. The Rigger must make a successful Repair (DC 15) check on the weapon. The weapon works for one round plus the number of rounds for every point the check succeeds. At 5th level, the Rigger can jury-rig Heavy Firearms with a Repair (DC 20) skill check and at 9 th level, the Rigger can jury-rig Energy Firearms and Weapons with a Repair (DC 30) skill check. If the Rigger fails the Repair check by 10 or more, then he rigs the gun in such a fashion that it fails to function or misfires, becoming useless. In the case of an Energy Firearm or Weapon, the weapon’s fusion cell is depleted and the weapon overloads, becoming useless until properly repaired.

Builder At 2nd level, the Rigger gains the Builder feat (Craft: electronic and Craft: mechanical) as a bonus feat.

Rig Vehicle At 4th level, the Rigger has the mechanical knowledge to rig a motor vehicle to temporary work. . . Well at least to get the eight track working. Rigging a vehicle requires a Repair (DC 25) skill check and some fusion cells. The vehicle runs for the number of hours that the check exceeds the DC unless the fusion cell is depleted first. If the Rigger fails the Repair check by 10 or more, then he fuses together the fusion generator and ruins the vehicles engine.

Advanced Rigging At 6th level the Rigger can take 10 on Repair Jury Rig skill checks when being threatened or distracted.

Persuade Malfunctioning Device

At 7th level, the Rigger understands the inner workings of machines and knows how to kick or smack them in the right places to make them work (or at least operational for a short period). A Rigger can persuade a malfunctioning machine or electronic device with a success Repair (DC 30) skill check to work for an hour plus an hour for every point the check succeeds. If the Rigger fails the Repair check by 10 or more, then the device fails to function and breaks, becoming unusable.

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264 Advanced Classes Rig Technological Device At 8th level, the Rigger has the technical knowledge to rig computers, bypass electronic locks, force fields, and other security devices, and so forth. Rigging a technological device requires a Repair (DC 35) skill check. The device works for one round plus the number of rounds that the check exceeds the DC. If the Rigger fails the Repair check by 10 or more, then he fails to rig the device, being locked out of computers, permanently setting the security devices and so on.

Superior Rigger At 10th level, the Rigger can take 20 on Repair Jury Rig skill checks when being threatened or distracted.

Slayer Tribal fables speak of a Slayer, a pale man dressed in black that can slay the dreaded Desert Reaper with nothing more than a dull spoon. Low and behold that pale man, the Slayer, does walks the Wastelands and it’s you. You have perfected the art of melee combat such that you are nearly invincible in battle. Woe to those who stand in your way, Slayer!

Requirements

To qualify to become a Slayer, a character must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +8 Feats: Awareness, Cleave, Improved Damage Threshold, Quick Draw, Power Attack, and Weapon Focus (or Weapon Finesse).

Talent: Advanced Damage Reduction or Advanced Melee Smash.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Slayer Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Slayer gains 1d12 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

The Slayer receives 3 Karma Points + his Slayer level and ½ of his other character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills A Slayer’s class skills are: Climb, Hide, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (street and tactics), Listen, Move Silently, Spot, Survival, Swim, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Slayer Advanced Class.

Better Critical Beginning at 1st level, the Slayer gains Better Critical as a bonus feat and can apply it only to a melee weapon or melee finesse group in which that the character is proficient. At 3 rd level, the Slayer

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gains this bonus feat again, applying it to a different melee weapon or finesse group.

Favored Weapon

At 2nd level, the Slayer has particular weapons he fancies with which to kill. All of the Slayer’s Weapon Focus feats (or Weapon Finesse groups) deal 2d6 points of extra damage per hit.

Living Anatomy

At 2nd level, the Slayer has killed enough foes with melee weapons to better understand that a good strike to the liver (or other vital areas) puts his foe down quickly. The Slayer gains Living Anatomy as a bonus feat even if he does not have the prerequisites to normal gain the feat.

More Critical Beginning at 3rd level, the Slayer gains More Critical as a bonus feat and can apply it only to a melee weapon or melee finesse group in which that the character is proficient. At 5th level the Slayer gains this bonus feat again, applying it to a different melee weapon of finesse group.

Slayer Level 1 2 3 4 5

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Ref +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2

Special Better Critical Favored Weapon, Living Anatomy Better Critical, More Critical Bypass Armor Death Stalks the Land, More Critical

Bypass Armor

At 4th level, a Slayer’s knows the weak points of armor and his melee attacks ignore the first 5 points of a target’s PDR.

Death Stalks the Land At 5th level, the Slayer may make a Death Attack against a target that he has studied for at least three rounds. The target must be unaware of the attack, denied his Dexterity, flat-footed, flanked, or helpless in melee in order for the attack to be successful. Studying the target requires that the Slayer spend three full-round actions in non-combat actions, and may only make 5-ft adjustments, failure to spend these actions results in a failed Death Attack. After studying the target, the Slayer must make the Death Attack in the next three rounds; else the target evades the Death Attack, becoming aware of the Slayer’s actions. If the Slayer’s attack roll is successful, then the target must make a Fortitude save DC 10 plus damage dealt or die from the critical Death Attack. If the target has the Improved Damage Threshold feat, he receives a +3 bonus (times the feat ranks) to the Fortitude saves.

Sniper Throughout history the military has trained assassins in the use of high-powered sniper rifles to strike and kill targets from up to a mile away. You have rediscovered the mastery of the Sniper Rifle and few can ever hope to match your prowess. Now find yourself a nice spot on a grassy knoll or bell tower and get to work!

Requirements

To qualify to become a Sniper, a character must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +8 Feats: Advanced Firearm Proficiency, Far Shot, Weapon Focus (sniper rifle), Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot, and Quick Reload.

Equipment: Sniper Rifle

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266 Advanced Classes Class Information The following information pertains to the Sniper Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Sniper 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points The Sniper receives 3 Karma Points + his Sniper level and ½ of his other character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills

Snipers may choose two skills from this list to add to their class skills: Balance, Climb, Craft (mechanical: guns), Concentration, Hide, Jump, Knowledge (tactics), Move Silently, Spot, and Survival.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Sniper Advanced Class.

Better Criticals Beginning at 1st level, the Sniper gains Better Criticals (Sniper Rifle) as a bonus feat.

Improved Rifle At 1st level, the Sniper can use a normal rifle with a scope as a ghetto sniper rifle. The Sniper can benefit from any feat that he has with a sniper rifle, the only change is the range of the rifle versus the sniper rifle.

Bypass Cover

Sniper Level 1 2 3 4 5

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5

Fort +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Ref +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3

Special Better Critical, Improvised Rifle Bypass Cover, Sniper Shot More Critical Improved Targeting, Sniper Shot One Shot, One Kill

At 2nd level, the Sniper has learned to pinpoint targets with his sniper rifle when using cover to hide behind and ignores cover bonus of one-half or less. Targets using one-half of less cover do not gain the Defense benefits provided by the cover when this character shoots at them.

Sniper Shot At 2nd level, the Sniper’s Far Shot feat increases the range of the weapon by times 2 instead of 1.5 for determining range and range increments. At 4th level, this increases to times 3. Killing at long distances is even easier now.

More Criticals

Beginning at 3rd level, the Sniper gains More Critical (Sniper Rifle) as a bonus feat.

Improved Targeting

At 4th level, the character has learned to pinpoint a particular body part from a ranged distance and strike with deadly force. When using a targeted attack, the character gains a +4 bonus with his sniper rifle to strike a chosen body part, or a creature or robot’s anatomy.

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One Shot, One Kill

At 5th level, the Sniper may make a Targeted Attack with his sniper rifle against an unwitting foe. The target must be unaware of the attack and not immune to critical hits (like robots). This attack increases the damage multiplier by +1 on a successful hit. If the hit is a critical hit, the damage multiplier increases by +2 to the targeted area, plus the critical status effects that apply, should the target still be alive.

Socialite The Socialite is a man or woman that is a sharp dresser and is well-known in the Wasteland. The Socialite demands attention, making great conversationalists, and serves those willing to pay as a source of information and sometimes even as escorts. A Socialite’s natural environment is in upstanding Wasteland establishments where she can excel at her trade.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Socialite, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Ability: Charisma 13+. Reputation: 20% any one category. Skills: Bluff 6 ranks, Sense Motive 6 ranks.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Socialite Advanced Class.

Hit Die

Socialites gain 1d6 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points: The Socialite receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills The Socialite’s class skills are as follows: Bluff, Concentration, Diplomacy, Decipher Script, Disguise, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Intimidate, Knowledge (behavioral sciences, current events, popular culture, streetwise), Listen, Perform (acting and music), Profession, Sense Motive, and Spot.

Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Socialite Advanced Class.

Self-Confidence At 1st level, the Socialite may treat her Socialite levels as Charisma bonus to any Talent where a Charisma bonus is applied.

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268 Advanced Classes The Socialite Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5

Fort +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Ref +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Hidden Motives Special Self-confidence Hidden motives Bonus feat Hidden allegiance Audience Bonus feat Daze Utterly convincing Bonus feat Charm person

At 2nd level, the Socialite increases her ability to hide her motives and intentions. She gains a circ*mstance bonus equal to her Socialite levels when using Bluff against a Sense Motive skill. In addition, the DC for Bluff checks against her is increased by her Socialite levels.

Bonus Feats At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Socialite gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Socialite must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Socialite Bonus Feats Alertness, Attentive, Awareness, Confident, Creative, Deceptive, Earlier Sequence, Empathy, Improved Initiative, Iron Will, Low Profile, Magnetic Personality, Negotiator, Renown, Thief, Trustworthy, Windfall.

Hidden Allegiance

At 4th level, the Socialite can suppress her loyalties. When questioned about her loyalties, the character gains a +10 bonus to her Bluff skill check and any other skill checks, such as Intimidate, that would try to extract her loyalties. Daze Display: Mental, Sensual Time: Attack action Range: Close (30 ft.) Target: One person not in combat Duration: 1 round Saving Throw: DC = 10 + Socialite level + CHR bonus. Will negates. Daze clouds the mind of a NPC target so that he or she takes no actions. NPCs over the character’s Socialite levels are not affected. The dazed subject is not stunned (so attackers get no special advantage against him or her), but the subject cannot move or take actions.

Audience At 5th level, the Socialite may extend any Charm or Fast-Talk talents to a number of targets equal to her total of Socialite levels. Individual targets are otherwise affected as described under the talent.

Daze

At 7th level, the Socialite gains the ability to flaunt her stuff and daze an individual of her choice. This ability may be used a number of times per day equal to the character’s Socialite’s level. This ability cannot be used on other player characters.

Utterly Convincing At 8th level, the Socialite is a master at convincing people. Whenever the Socialite spends a Karma Point to improve a Charisma-based skill check, she adds an additional 1d6 to the result.

Charm Person

At 10th level, the Socialite gains the ability to make friends easily and may charm one individual, once per day. This ability may be used once per day and cannot be used on other player characters. Charm Person Display: Mental, Sensual Time: Attack action Range: Close (30 ft.) Target: One person not in combat Duration: 10 hours Saving Throw: DC = 10 + Socialite level + CHR bonus. Will negates. This power makes a NPC regard the Socialite as his or her trusted friend and ally. This charm does not enable the Socialite to control the charmed person as if he or she was an automaton, but he or she does perceive the Socialite’s words and actions in the most favorable way. The Socialite can try to give the subject orders, but the Socialite must win an opposed Charisma check to convince the subject to do anything he or she would not ordinarily do. (The Socialite cannot try again.) A charmed person never obeys suicidal or obviously harmful orders. Any act by the Socialite or his or her apparent allies that threatens the charmed person breaks the charm. Note also that the Socialite must speak the person’s language to communicate his or her commands.

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Soldier The Soldier is the poor man’s army of hired a gunman. A Soldier trains his body and mind to be prepared for combat and the other dangers of the wastelands.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Soldier, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +3 Skill: Knowledge (tactics) 3 ranks. Feat:

Personal Proficiency.

Firearms

Class Information The following information pertains to the Soldier Advanced Class.

The Soldier Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Weapon Focus Weapon specialization Bonus feat Tactical aid Improved critical Bonus feat Improved reaction Greater weapon specialization Bonus feat Critical strike

Hit Die: 1d10 Karma Points

A Soldier receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills The Soldier’s class skills are: Demolitions, Intimidate, Jump, Knowledge (history, street, and tactics), Listen, Navigate, Profession, Spot, Survival, and Swim.

Skill Points at Each Level: 3 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Soldier Advanced Class.

Weapon Focus At 1st level, a Soldier gains the Weapon Focus class feature, providing the benefit of the feat with the same name. The Soldier chooses a specific weapon. The Soldier can choose unarmed strike or grapple as the weapon. The Soldier must be proficient with the chosen weapon. The Soldier adds +1 to all attack rolls made using the selected weapon.

Weapon Specialization At 2nd level, a Soldier gains Weapon Specialization with a specific melee or ranged weapon to which he also has applied the Weapon Focus class feature from 1st level. The Soldier gets a +2 bonus on damage rolls with the chosen weapon.

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270 Advanced Classes Bonus Feats At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Soldier gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Soldier must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Tactical Aid

As a full-round action, the Soldier provides tactical aid to all of his allies (including himself) within sight and voice range of his position. This use of Tactical Aid requires an action point.

Soldier Bonus Feats Advanced Firearms Proficiency, Archaic Weapons Proficiency, Armor Proficiency (light), Armor Proficiency (medium), Armor Proficiency (heavy), Brawl, Burst Fire, Cleave, Combat Reflexes, Demolition Expert, Exotic Firearms Proficiency, Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency, Far Shot, Great Cleave, Heave Ho!, HtH Evade, HtH Fighting, Improved Brawl, Improved Grapple, Improved Knockout Punch, Knockout Punch, and Power Attack.

This aid provides a +1 competence bonus on attack rolls. The bonus lasts for the number of rounds equal to one-half of the Soldier’s advanced class level, rounded down.

Improved Critical At 4th level, the weapon the Soldier applied Weapon Specialization at 2 nd level increases its critical threat range by one.

Improved Reaction At 7th level, a Soldier gains a +2 competence bonus on initiative checks.

Greater Weapon Specialization At 8th level, a Soldier gains Greater Weapon Specialization with the weapon he selected at 2nd level. This ability increases the bonus on damage rolls to +4 when using the selected weapon.

Critical Strike At 10th level, a Soldier can spend a Karma Point to automatically confirm a threat as a critical hit when attacking with the weapon he has applied weapon specialization to at 2 nd level, eliminating the need to make a roll to confirm the critical hit.

Steel Disciple Initiate The Steel Disciples is the one of the United States Government splinted-cell organizations that plans to restore order to the Wasteland by amassing a great army. With their technology and military background, they have the discipline to do just that. The Disciples do not recruit lightly, however. It is a lifetime commitment, and the initiate must show a great deal of combat prowess and pass an initiation quest. The rank of Initiate is merely the first step into full membership within the Steel Disciples. This advanced class is the prerequisite to advance to a Scribe or Knight in the Steel Disciples.

Requirements

To qualify for membership in the Steel Disciples, potential initiates must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +1

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Disciples. This often involves retrieving some piece of technology in which the Disciples is interested; it can also involve information or military intelligence about an enemy of the Disciples. The initiation quest is designed to be difficult and to test a potential recruit’s dedication.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Steel Disciples Initiate Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Disciple Initiate gains 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

The Disciple Initiate receives 3 Karma Points plus his Disciple level plus ½ of any other non-Disciple character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills The Steel Disciples Initiates class skills are: Computer Use, Demolitions, Disable Device, Drive, Knowledge (History), Repair, Research, Spot, Survival, Treat Injury.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Steel Disciples Initiate Advanced Class.

Basic Training

At 1st level, a Steel Disciple Initiate gains the Weapon Focus feat for a specific weapon of choice in which the Initiate is proficient.

Disciples of Steel Initiate Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5

+1 +2 +3 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+1 +2 +2 +3 +3

Basic Training Initiate Senior Initiate Advanced Training Initiation to BOS

Initiate At 2nd level, an Initiate gains access to the Disciples vast weapon resources. Initiates are not trusted with the most important weapons, but may choose a single personal firearm or melee weapon from the Disciples armory. This includes any weapon that falls under the Personal Firearm Proficiency or the Archaic Weapon Proficiency that has a scarcity rating of common, uncommon, or infrequent qualifies. The Initiate receives the weapon of his choice, and should the weapon break or be lost, a replacement will be supplied. The Initiate also receives sufficient ammunition for his weapon (usually 5 reloads) and may replenish the supply from a Disciple depot when said supply runs out.

Senior Initiate At 3rd level, the Initiate is trained to defend himself in the art of hand to hand melee fighting and gains one of the following Feats as a result: Brawl, Defensive Martial Arts, Dodge, Power Attack, Weapon Finesse, or Weapon Focus.

Advanced Training

At 4th level, the Initiate begins to go through advanced Disciple military training. He gains one of the following as a bonus feat: Exotic Firearm (energy), Exotic Firearm (heavy weapons), or Exotic Weapon (any).

Initiation to BOS

At 5th level, the Initiate’s membership in the Disciples is complete. The Initiate gains access to other Disciple advanced classes as he progresses, and must declare whether he wishes to become a Scribe or a Knight. The Initiate gains a suit of combat armor and can upgrade his weapon from the Initiate level scarcity to include rare category of weaponry. If a rare scarcity weapon is lost, however, it will not be replaced.

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Steel Disciple Knight The Steel Disciple Knight is the enforcer of the Disciples. These knights are trained hard to combat threats, like Trans-Genetic Mutants, and to gather lost technology from the Wasteland to further their goals in restoring humanity to a pre-war state—under their direct supervision, of course.

Requirements

To qualify for the Steel Disciple Knight, a character must meet the following requirements:

Advanced Class: Steel Disciple Initiate – Level 5.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Steel Disciple Knight Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Disciple Knight gains 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

The Disciple Knight receives 3 Karma Points plus his Disciple level plus ½ of any other non-Disciple character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills

The Steel Disciple Knight class skills are: Climb, Diplomacy, Gather Information, Jump, Intimidate, Knowledge (civics and tactics), Listen, Move Silently, Navigate, Search, and Swim.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Steel Disciple Knight Advanced Class.

Favored Enemy

Steel Disciple Knight Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense Bonus

Special

1 2 3 4 5

+1 +2 +3 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1

+1 +1 +1 +2 +2

Favored Enemy, Knight Awareness, Energy Weapon Favored Enemy, Power Armor Tactical Master Bolster Troops, Favored Enemy

Beginning at 1st level, a Knight may choose a particular organization or type of creature as a sworn enemy on the chart. The Knight receives +1 to attack rolls against his Favored Enemy, or a member of an Enemy organization (provided the Knight knows he’s dealing with an Enemy). Additionally, the Knight gains a +2 bonus on Bluff, Listen, Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival checks when using these skills against creatures of this type. At 3rd and 5th level the Knight gains an additional enemy from which to choose. The knight may choose the same enemy to stack the attack and skill bonuses.

Knight

Steel Disciple Knight Favored Enemy Organization Beastmasters Children of the Apocalypse Crime Syndicate (any one crime family or wasteland town) NEMO Raiders San Francisco (Chi Rebels) Slavers

Creature Ghūls Humans 1 Trans-Genetic Mutants

1 SD knights cannot choose humans as their favored enemy; they must pick a

human organization instead.

At 1st level, the Knight has been initiated into the Steel Disciples, and has taken an oath to further the Disciple’s goals to restore the Wasteland to order and bring a new golden age to humanity. The Knight is expected to follow all orders given by a superior officer (Paladins and Generals) and to take initiative to further SD goals during off time. Failure to follow an order, or sabotage the goals of the Disciples, results in the character being: stripped of all equipment, locked in the brig for 10 years, and then released into the Wasteland.

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Awareness

At 2nd level, the Knight gains Awareness as a bonus feat, even if he fails to meet the prerequisites. If the Knight already has this feat, then it counts as the second (or third) level progression of the feat, as described in the Awareness Description.

Energy Weapon At 2nd level, the Knight gains the Exotic Firearm (energy) as a bonus feat. If the Knight already has the Exotic Firearm (energy) feat from his initiate days, he instead gains a +1 proficiency bonus on attack rolls (the character must have the Exotic Firearm (energy) feat prior to this ability to benefit the proficiency bonus; this bonus cannot be gained later). The Disciples also equips the Knight with an ElectroMac 1000 laser pistol. Should this weapon be destroyed or lost the Disciples will not replace the firearm.

Power Armor At 3rd level, the Disciple’s equips a Knight with a suit of SD Power Armor. Should this Power Armor be destroyed or lost the Disciples will not replace the suit, and the character faces expulsion from the Disciples after a fair trial by a panel of three Steel Disciple Paladins. If the suit is stolen, then the Knight faces being: stripped of all equipment, locked in the brig for 10 years, and then released into the Wasteland.

Tactical Master

At 4th level, the Knight has fielded enough hours to understand terrain and its effect in combat. When using cover during combat the Knight gains an additional cover bonus of +1 to existing cover (includes reflex save from cover).

Bolster Troops At 5th level, the Knight’s presence raises his troops’ morale. All of the Knight’s fellow Steel Disciple soldiers and allies within 60 feet of the Knight gain a +1 tactical bonus to attack rolls and +1 morale bonus to fear-based Will saving throws. If the Knight spends a full-round action before combat speaking with his troops and allies, the bonuses increase by +1 (for a total +2 bonus) for the duration of the combat.

Steel Disciple Scribe The Steel Disciple Scribe is the brain of the Steel Disciple organization. While Steel Disciple Knights enforce the ethics of the Disciples and gather new and lost technology, it is the Scribe that researches what the Knight finds and reports. A Scribe’s job in the Disciples is to learn the weaknesses of their enemies through study and experimentation; and, to research found technology to further scientific advancements for the Disciples.

Requirements

To qualify for membership in the Steel Disciples Scribe, a character must meet the following requirements:

Advanced Class: Steel Disciple Initiate– Level 5.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Steel Disciple Scribe Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Disciple Scribe gains 1d6 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

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274 Advanced Classes Karma Points The Disciple Scribe receives 3 Karma Points plus his Disciple level plus ½ of any other non-Disciple character levels upon attaining a new level. This replaces the initial ruling of 3 Karma Points + ½ character level.

Class Skills

The Steel Disciple Scribe class skills are: Craft (any), Decipher Script, Forgery, Gather Information, Investigate, Knowledge (civics, geography, science, technology, and theology and philosophy), Research, and Sense Motive.

Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + INT modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Steel Disciples Scribe Advanced Class.

Research

At 1st level, a Disciple Scribe gains Studious as a bonus feat. Additionally, when researching in a Disciple facility, the time it takes to research a known topic (such as a Disciple Knight’s Favored Enemy), the time required is reduced from 1d4 hours to 1d2 hours.

Skill Mastery At 1st level, a Scribe selects a number of skills from his or her class list equal to 3 + his or her Intelligence modifier. When making a skill check using one of these skills, the Scribe may take 10 even if stress and distractions would normally prevent him or her from so doing.

Bonus Feat At 2nd and 4th levels, a Scribe can choose a bonus feat from the feats presented here, and the Scribe must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it. Steel Disciple Scribe Bonus Feats Attentive, Awareness, Builder, Cautious, Comprehension, Educated, Gearhead, Meticulous, or Quick Pockets.

Steel Disciples Scribe Level 1 2 3 4 5

BAB +0 +1 +1 +2 +2

Fort +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Ref +1 +2 +2 +2 +3

Will +1 +2 +2 +2 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3

Special Research, Skill Mastery Bonus Feat, Energy Weapon Technology Master Bonus Feat, Power Armor The Collective

Energy Weapon

At 2nd level, the Scribe gains the Exotic Firearm (energy) as a bonus feat. If the Scribe already has the Exotic Firearm (energy) feat from his initiate days, he instead gains a +1 proficiency bonus on attack rolls (the character must have the Exotic Firearm (energy) feat prior to this ability to benefit from the proficiency bonus; this bonus cannot be gained later). The Disciples also equips the Scribe with a Mega-Watz 500 laser pistol. Should this weapon be destroyed or lost the Disciples will not replace the firearm.

Technology Master At 3rd level, a Scribe has mastered technology. He gains a +2 proficiency bonus to Craft (technology), and Knowledge (technology) skill checks. The Scribe also gains a +2 proficiency bonus to Disable Device and Repairs skill checks made on technical devices. The Scribe also gains the blueprints and schematics to build Energy Firearms (Pistols and Rifles) and Power Armor.

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At 4th level, the Disciples equip a Scribe that goes out into the field with a suit of Disciple Power Armor. Should this Power Armor be destroyed or lost the Disciples will not replace the suit, and the character faces expulsion from the Disciples after a fair trial by a panel of three Steel Disciple Paladins. If the suit is stolen, then the Scribe faces being: stripped of all equipment, locked in the brig for 10 years, and then released into the Wasteland.

The Collective

At 5th level, the Scribe gains access to the Disciples collective library. The Scribe gains a +10 bonus to all Knowledge (engineering, history, geography, medicine, nature, science, technology, and theology and philosophy) and Research skill checks when consulting the collective.

Street Warrior Warriors, come out to play. A Street Warrior is an urban fighter usually belonging to a criminal organization, street gang, or protectorate.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Street Warrior, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Background: City Slicker, Cultist, Gangster, Urban Survivor, or Special.

Base Attack Bonus: +3 Skills: Knowledge (street or underworld) 6 ranks. Feats: Street Fighting, Brawl. Special: Before taking the Street Warrior Advanced Class, the Street Warrior must have an allegiance of some from with an urban area or group. This could include a particular cult, gang, or organization that would be suitable for an urban-oriented character.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Street Warrior Advanced Class.

Hit Die Street Warriors gain 1d10 hit points per level. character’s Constitution modifier applies.

The

Karma Points

A Street Warrior receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Street Warrior’s class skills are as follows: Bluff, Diplomacy, Disable Device, Drive, Gamble, Gather Information, Hide, Intimidate, Investigate, Jump, Knowledge (street and tactics), Move Silently, Profession, Sense Motive, Spot, and Survival.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Intelligence modifier.

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276 Advanced Classes Class Features The following features pertain to the Street Warrior Advanced Class.

Urban Survival

At 1st level, the Street Warrior gains a +4 competence bonus on Survival checks in urban areas, that includes the ability to follow tracks, hunt feral animals, find (or lose) individuals in urban the maze, find safe places to crash, and avoid hazards peculiar to a city environment.

The Street Warrior Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10

+2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Urban survival Improvised Weapons Bonus feat Street Cred Improved Street Fighting Bonus feat Weapon specialization Improvised weapon damage Bonus feat Advanced Street Fighting

Improvised Weapons

At 2nd level, the Street Warrior becomes an expert at using Improvised Weapons. The Street Warrior does not take a –4 penalty on attack rolls when wielding an improvised weapon.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Street Warrior gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Street Warrior must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Street Cred At 4th level, the Street Warrior adds his Reputation bonus to Charisma skill checks in his home location, or in situations involving others of his chosen allegiance(s). These skills include Bluff, Diplomacy, Gather Information, and Intimidate.

Street Warrior Bonus Feats Advanced Firearms Proficiency, Armor Proficiency (Light), Combat Throw, Defensive Martial Arts, Elusive Target, Fleet of Foot, Gambler, HtH Fighter, Improved Brawl, Improved Combat Throw, Improved Feint, Improved Knockout Punch, Knockout Punch, Personal Firearms Proficiency, Thief, Weapon Focus, and Unbalance Opponent.

Improved Street Fighting The extra damage provided by the Street Fighting feat increases to 1d4+2.

Weapon Specialization

At 7th level, the Street Warrior gains weapon specialization with a specific melee weapon (including unarmed strike). The weapon must be one in which the Street Warrior has a Weapon Focus feat. He gets a +2 bonus on all damage rolls with the chosen weapon. Should the Street Warrior not have a Weapon Focus, he does not get this ability until such a time that he gains Weapon Focus.

Improvised Weapon Damage

At 8th level, the Street Warrior’s attacks with improvised weapons deal more damage. He treats an improvised weapon as one size category larger than it is for the purpose of determining the damage it deals.

Advanced Street Fighting The extra damage provided by the Street Fighting feat increases to 1d4+4.

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Swindler A Swindler is a master of luck and tricky. It is said that a sucker is born every minute, and you don’t have any problems finding suckers to pull a scam on.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Swindler, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Skills: Bluff 6 ranks, Disguise 4 ranks, Gamble 6 ranks.

Talents: Any two of the following talents: Charm, Coordinate, Fast-Talk.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Swindler Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Swindler gains 1d6 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points A Swindler receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

The Swindler’s class skills are as follows: Barter, Bluff, Diplomacy, Disguise, Escape Artist, Forgery, Gamble, Gather Information, Knowledge (civics, street, underworld, and theology and philosophy), Perform (Cha), Research, Sense Motive, Sleight of Hand, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 5 + Int modifier

Class Features

The following class features pertain to the Swindler Advanced Class.

Cheat Fate Fortune favors the Swindler. Once per day, he may re-roll one roll that he has just made before the success or failure of the result is announced. The Swindler must take the result of the reroll, even if it is worse than the original roll.

The Swindler Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Defense Bonus +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3

Special Cheat fate Thousand faces Bonus feat Fortune’s favor (+2) Warp probability (30 ft.) Bonus feat Fortune’s favor (+4) Warp probability (60 ft.) Bonus feat Fortune’s favor (+6)

Thousand Faces

A Swindler’s ability to manipulate probability makes him unpopular in certain circles, increasing the need for a ready number of disguises. At 2nd level, the Swindler becomes a master of the quick disguise. He can don a convincing disguise in one-tenth the normal time (1d4 minutes).

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278 Advanced Classes Bonus Feats At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Swindler gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Swindler must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Fortune’s Favor

Swindler Bonus Feats Blind-Fight, Better Critical, Comprehension, Confident, Deceptive, Educated, Elusive Target, Gambler, Harmless, Karma Beacon, Low Profile, More Critical, Negotiator, Nimble, Pickpocket, Renown, Thief, and Trustworthy

Starting at 4th level, the Swindler learns to subtly manipulate the fortunes of his adversaries, making him harder to strike in combat. He can spend a Karma Point to gain a +2 luck bonus to Defense against all attacks for the number of rounds equal to his Swindler’s advanced class levels. The Swindler must use this ability on his turn; and, uses this ability instead of Dodge on his turn. The luck bonus to Defense increases to +4 at 7th level and +6 at 10th level.

Warp Probability

At 5th level, the Swindler can affect another creature’s attack roll, skill check, ability check, level check, or saving throw. As a free action during another creature’s turn, the Swindler can spend a Karma Point to alter the target’s d20 roll result. The Swindler must be within 30 feet of the target, must be able to see the target, and must declare that he is spending the Karma Point before the result of the target’s roll is revealed. The Swindler’s Karma Point die result counts either as a bonus or penalty to the target’s roll, at the Swindler’s discretion. At 8th level, the range of this ability increases to 60 feet.

Thrasher The Thrasher is the barbarian of the Wastelands, relying on the “Might Make Right” belief to walk through life.

Requirements To qualify to become a Thrasher, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +2. Skills: Concentration 6 ranks, Survival 6 ranks. Feats: Athletic or Endurance.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Thrasher Advanced Class.

Hit Die Thrashers gain 1d12 hit points per level. The character’s Constitution modifier applies.

Karma Points A Thrasher receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

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Class Skills

The Thrasher’s class skills are as follows: Balance, Climb, Concentration, Drive, Profession, Ride, Spot, Swim, Survival, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 1 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Thrasher Advanced Class.

Tough Defense Using his Constitution instead of his Dexterity, the Thrasher applies his Constitution bonus to his Defense instead of his Dexterity bonus. Any situation that would deny the Thrasher his Dexterity bonus to Defense denies the Constitution bonus.

Ability Surge

The Thrasher At 2nd, 5th, and 8th level, the Thrasher Defense can temporarily increase his Strength Level BAB Fort Ref Will Bonus Special and Dexterity, but at a penalty to saving 1st +1 +2 +1 +0 +0 Tough Defense throws. The Thrasher gains a +4 2nd +2 +3 +2 +0 +1 Ability surge 1/day morale bonus to both Strength and 3rd +3 +3 +2 +1 +1 Bonus feat Dexterity, but takes a –2 penalty on all 4th +3 +4 +2 +1 +1 Uncanny dodge X +4 +4 +3 +1 +2 Ability surge 2/day saving throws. Activating ability surge 5th +5 +5 +3 +2 +2 Bonus feat is a free action, and the surge lasts for 6th +6 +5 +3 +2 +2 Damage reduction 5/+1 as many rounds as the character has 7th 8th +6 +6 +4 +2 +3 Ability surge 3/day Thrasher levels. Following an ability 9th +7 +6 +4 +3 +3 Bonus feat surge, the Thrasher is fatigued (–2 to 10th +8 +7 +5 +3 +3 Damage reduction 10/+1 Strength and Dexterity) for as many rounds as he surged, but may negate this penalty as a free action by spending an action point. The Thrasher may use the ability surge once per day at 2nd level, twice per day at 5th level, and three times per day at 8th level. Thrasher Bonus Feats Adrenaline Rush, Alertness, Blind-Fight, Brawl, Bracing, Cleave, Combat Expertise, Combat Reflexes, Far Shot, Focused, Great Cleave, Heave Ho!, HtH Fighter, Improved Brawl, Improved Knockout Punch, Improved Trip, Knockout Punch, Power Attack, Presence, Strong Back, and Stonewall.

Bonus Feats

At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, the Thrasher gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the feats presented here, and the Thrasher must meet all the prerequisites of the feat to select it.

Uncanny Dodge X

The Thrasher gains the talent Uncanny Dodge, or increases the potency of this talent to Uncanny Dodge 2. If the Thrasher already has Uncanny Dodge 2, then he gains no further benefit from this ability.

Damage Reduction Starting at 7th level, the Thrasher gains the ability to shrug off some amount of injury from each attack. The Thrasher gains damage reduction PDR 3, which stack with the damage reduction talents or any other class ability that grants PDR. At 10th level, this damage reduction increases to PDR 5.

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Tribal Shaman A Shaman is the leader in tribal society. Although a Shaman may not “rule” like a raider king or an elected official, he or she is certainly the most respected member of the tribe. He or she acts as an advisor of sorts to those who rule in name, often being called upon to make the most difficult decisions. Shamans are both intelligent and spiritual, recognizing the need for religious tradition even if they do not necessarily believe it themselves.

Requirements To qualify to become a Tribal Shaman, a character must meet the following requirements:

Ability Score: Intelligence and Wisdom 13+ Base Attack Bonus: +3 Background: Tribal Skills: Diplomacy 6 ranks and Knowledge (theology and philosophy) 6 ranks Feats: Presence, Trustworthy.

Class Information

The following information pertains to the Shaman Advanced Class.

Hit Die

The Tribal Shaman gains 1d8 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points

A Tribal Shaman receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills

A Shaman’s class skills are: Bluff, Craft (chemical), Decipher Script, Diplomacy, Handle Animal, Intimidate, Knowledge (nature and theology and philosophy), Listen, Perform (dance and music), and Sense Motive.

Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modifier.

Class Features

The following features pertain to the Tribal Shaman Advanced Class.

Mediation

Tribal Shaman Level

BAB Bonus

Fort

Ref

Will

1 2 3 4 5

+0 +1 +1 +2 +2

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2

+2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Defense Bonus +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Special Mediation, Voice of the Ancestors Bonus Feat, Strength of the Ancestors Brew Tribal Remedies Bonus Feat, Blood of the Ancestors Vision of the Ancestors

At 1st level, the Tribal Shaman learns the ancient ways of meditation. Meditation involves the use of an addictive chemical (drug) and allows the Shaman to see visions to help guide his way and that of whom he protects. A shaman must use a chemical and spend a minimum of one hour in solitude in order to gain a vision; some abilities take more time and are described in the ability below. The Shaman does not gain the benefits or a penalty of the addictive drug used to gain the vision, but does have the addiction chance and penalties therein.

Voice of the Ancestors At 1st level, the Tribal Shaman can call for spiritual guidance. This ability spoken through chants has a calming and focusing effect on the Shaman’s companions. All friendly characters within hearing distance receive a +1 inspiration bonus to skill checks and fear-based Will saving throws. This ability lasts as long as the Shaman chants and for 3 rounds after he stops.

Strength of the Ancestors

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At 2nd level, the Tribal Shaman can call upon his ancestral faith to bolster his body and mind. The Shaman gains a +2 faith bonus to STR, CON, and WIS after praying to his ancestors for one full-round action. This bonus lasts the number of rounds equal to the Shaman’s level +1. The Shaman may use this ability only the number of times per day equal to his Tribal Shaman levels. Additionally the Shaman can expend a Karma Point and boost the faith bonus to a +4 instead of +2 to STR, CON, and WIS.

Bonus Feat At levels 2nd and 4th levels, a Shaman may choose a bonus feat from the following list to the right. The Shaman must still meet the requirements of the bonus feat in order to gain its benefits.

Tribal Shaman Bonus Feats Alertness, Animal Affinity, Comprehension, Deceptive, Educated, Endurance, Great Fortitude, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes, Negotiator, Rad Child, or Toughness.

Brew Tribal Remedies

At 3rd level, a Tribal Shaman receives a vision from the ancestors during a meditation period showing him the chemicals of the earth and how to mix them together to make Tribal Remedies. The Shaman learns how to brew the Tribal chemical (drugs) of Antidote, Healing Powder, and Voodoo. The craft DC listed for these chemicals are reduced by 5 for the Shaman. The Shaman must still gather the material in order to brew the remedies. These Tribal Remedies are by far not the only remedies throughout the Wasteland; the Shaman may gain future visions through meditation for additional remedies as the Overseer sees fit to allow in his campaign.

Blood of the Ancestors At 4th level, the Shaman can call spiritual forces to bolster the tribe’s warriors in battle. This ability gives a number of creatures or characters equal to the Shaman’s level gain 2d6 temporary hit points for one hour. Using this ability requires mediation and affects a number of chosen targets within the level limit that the Shaman touches. The Shaman cannot benefit from this ability and the effects do not stack with other abilities or items that provide temporary hit points.

Visions of the Ancestors

At 5th level, the Tribal Shaman can enter into a meditative state that grants him visions of future events. The visions granted by this ability give the shaman a brief look into the future and grants him a +1 insight (paranoia) bonus to Defense and Reflex saves for the number of hours equal to the character’s Tribal Shaman level plus Wisdom modifier. The visions that the Shaman receives may not be of good or ill tidings, however, they may not be anything at all. The Shaman has a chance of losing a Karma Point when using this ability if he has a foreboding vision. The chance of loss is 1 in 20 on a d20 roll. This ability may only be used once every 24-hours.

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Tribal Warrior Tribal society is based largely on the idea that all members of the tribe must be able to do everything, otherwise the tribe will not survive. While Tribals know how to defend the tribe against threats, Tribal Warriors are members who are full-time protectors, and are among the greatest– and most vicious –warriors in the Wastes.

Requirements

To qualify to become a Tribal Warrior, a character must meet the following requirements:

Base Attack Bonus: +1 Skills: Survival 4 ranks Feats: Power Attack, Weapon Focus (archaic weapon).

Class Information The following information pertains to the Tribal Warrior Advanced Class.

Hit Die The Tribal Warrior gains 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points A Tribal Warrior receives 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills Tribal Warriors class skills are: Balance, Climb, Handle Animal, Jump, Knowledge (geography and nature), Survival, Spot, Swim, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 3 + Int modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Tribal Warrior Advanced Class.

Desert Survival At 1st level, a Tribal Warrior gains the ability to survive in the desert for long periods of time, mostly due to hours and days spent training in extreme conditions. The character gains Endurance as a bonus feat and can survive long periods in extreme heat conditions without food and water longer than the normal Wasteland survivor. The Tribal Warrior environmental hazards change as described in Chapter 5 to the following:

Tribal Warrior Level

BAB

Fort

Ref

Will

Defense

Special

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

+0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Desert Survival Tribal Weapon Master Bonus Feat Better Criticals Ancestral Frenzy Bonus Feat Wasteland Resistance More Criticals Bonus Feat Ancestral Frenzy x2

When in the desert climate the warrior can survive one hour of prolonged heat exposure before having to make a Fortitude save vs. heat exhaustion, and then only having to make additional saves every one-half hour afterwards. The Warrior can go without water for 3 days plus the number of hours equal to his Constitution modifier before needing to succeed a Constitution check to avoid dehydration. Lastly, the Warrior can go without food for five days plus his Constitution modifier before needing to succeed a Constitution check to avoid starvation.

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Tribal Weapon Master

At 2nd level, a Tribal Warrior becomes a master of tribal weapons. When using one of the following archaic melee or ranged weapons, the Warrior gains a +1 mastery bonus to attack rolls: Melee Weapons: Club, Knife, Pipe, Unarmed, and Spear. Ranged Weapons: Javelin, Rock, Short Bow, and Spear.

Bonus Feat At 3rd, 6th, and 9th level, a Tribal Warrior may choose a bonus feat presented here. All of the feat’s prerequisites must be met before the Tribal Warrior may choose that feat.

Better Critical

At 4th level, a Tribal Warrior gains the Better Critical feat, even if he does not meet the requirement. This bonus feat applies only to the list of Tribal Weapon Master archaic melee weapons listed above, however.

Tribal Warrior Bonus Feats Acrobatic, Animal Affinity, Armor Proficiency, Awareness, Combat Expertise, Combat Reflexes, Dodge, Agile Riposte, Mobility, Spring Attack, Endurance, Frightful Presence, Heroic Surge, Improved Initiative, Lightning Reflexes, Power Attack, Cleave, Great Cleave, Improved Bull Rush, Sunder, Quick Draw, Rad Resistance, Run, Track, Weapon Finesse, Weapon Focus.

Ancestral Fury At 5th level, a Tribal Warrior can call upon the spirits of his ancestors to aid him in battle. He enters into a combat frenzy and receives a temporary +4 morale bonus to STR and CON, and +2 to Will saves, for the number of rounds equal to one-half his Tribal Warrior levels plus his newly modified Constitution modifier. The Warrior becomes fatigued for one-hour after the effects of the frenzy ends. This ability can be used only once per day at 5th level, twice per day at 10th level. The Warrior can also harness his fury by spending a Karma Point to gain additional uses per day.

Wasteland Resistance

At 7th level, a Tribal Warrior has endured the Wasteland elements, building up immunities. He gains a +4 resistance bonus to Fortitude saves against Poison and Radiation effects. Additionally, the Warrior becomes immune to Radiation levels of 300 RAD and less.

More Critical

At 8th level, a Tribal Warrior gains the More Critical feat, even if he does not meet the requirement. This bonus feat applies only to the list of Tribal Weapon Master archaic melee weapons listed above, however.

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Weaponsmaster Archaic weapons are the second most popular weapon, next to the gun, in the Wasteland, but cheaper and easier to get. A Weaponsmaster trains with melee and ranged archaic weapons found in the Wastes to master their individual strengths, styles, and techniques to unleash powerful attacks on foolish opponents that come within range.

Requirements

To qualify to become an Weaponsmaster, a character must fulfill the following criteria:

Base Attack Bonus: +3. Skills: Knowledge (tactics) 4 ranks. Feats: Archaic Weapon Proficiency, Weapon Focus with an archaic weapon.

Class Information The following information pertains to the Weaponsmaster Advanced Class.

Hit Die Weaponsmasters gain 1d10 hit points per level plus the character’s Constitution modifier.

Karma Points Weaponsmasters receive 3 Karma Points plus ½ of his character level (round down) upon attaining a new level in this class.

Class Skills The Weaponsmaster’s class skills are as follows: Climb, Craft (mechanical, structural), Handle Animal, Jump, Knowledge (tactics, theology and philosophy), Profession, Ride, Swim, and Tumble.

Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Intelligence modifier.

Class Features The following features pertain to the Weaponsmaster Advanced Class.

Weapon Specialization At 1st level, the Weaponsmaster gains the Weapon Specialization feat to a single archaic weapon in which he is proficient and has the Weapon Focus feat. He gains a +2 bonus on all damage rolls with the weapon.

Improved Weapon Focus

The Weaponsmaster Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

BAB +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10

Fort +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Will +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Defense Bonus +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5

Special Weapon specialization Improved Weapon Focus +1 Bonus feat Quick weapon draw Expert in your field Bonus feat Weapon stun Improved Weapon Focus +2 Bonus feat Increased weapon critical

At 2nd level, the Weaponsmaster may treat any archaic weapon he wields as if he has the Weapon Focus feat for purposes of attack rolls. This does not qualify the weapons as a Weapon Focus requirement for other feats, the Weaponsmaster must still take the Weapon Focus feat to meet other feat’s requirements. At 8th level, the Weaponsmaster may treat any archaic weapon he wields as if he has a second Weapon Focus (that stacks with the first) feat gaining a +2 to attacks.

Bonus Feat At 3rd, 6th, and 9th levels, the Weaponsmaster gets a bonus feat. The bonus feat must be selected from the following list, and the Weaponsmaster must meet all of the prerequisites for the feat to select it.

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Weaponsmaster Bonus Feats Advanced Two-Weapon Fighting, Awareness, Better Critical, Blind-Fight, Combat Expertise, Cleave, Combat Reflexes, Dead Aim, Exotic Melee Weapon Proficiency, Far Shot, Great Cleave, Heave Ho!, Improved Bull Rush, Improved Disarm, Improved Trip, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, More Critical, Power Attack, Sunder, Two-Weapon Fighting, and Weapon Focus.

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Quick Weapon Draw

At 4th level, the Weaponsmaster gains the ability to draw her weapon as a free action. This applies only to the weapons for which the Weaponsmaster has Weapon Specialization.

Expert In Your Field

At 5th level, the Weaponsmaster is considered to be a master of his particular weapon, whether this is as a scholar with a detailed knowledge of the weapon’s history, or as a practitioner, such as a professional archer. Starting with 5th level, the Weaponsmaster gains a circ*mstance bonus equal to ½ his Weaponsmaster levels on skill checks that are directly involved with his knowledge and proficiency with the weapon. Such skills would include applicable Knowledge skills, as well as such social skills as Intimidate and Bluff.

Weapon Stun

At 7th level, the Weaponsmaster can use his weapon to deal non-lethal damage, without taking the –4 penalty on attack rolls. The Weaponsmaster must have Weapon Specialization in the weapon to use it in this fashion.

Increased Weapon Critical The Weaponsmaster increases his threat range by one when using an archaic weapon in which he has Weapons Specialization. A weapon that would threaten a critical on 20 would now do so on a 19 or 20, and one which threatens on a 19 or 20 would now do so on an 18 to 20. This ability works with other abilities that increase threat ranges.

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Chapter VII Exodus World

Wasteland Survival Guide “Are you ok? Calm down man. A few seconds longer and you could be dead buddy. You’re very lucky that I heard your screams. Damn mutant scorpions. What in the hell are you thinking traveling through the Wastelands alone? Come with me... Let me introduce myself. My name is Lazarus Haze, but most people call me “Stranger.” Why? It doesn't matter for now. You should think twice before leaving your hometown. What are you looking for? Adventure? Faster you'll find death. Money? You won't see it if you end up as a slave. Freedom? Then I'll give you a gun. Go and shoot yourself. Only then you'll be free. Ok, don't look at me that way. I was also young and foolish once... Start lighting up the bonfire and let me tell you something about the Wastelands, since without knowledge you'll end up as nothing more than a snack for those above you. And trust me, there is a lot to learn about.”

Organizations of the Wastes The Children of the Apocalypse are the remnants of a pre-War doomsday cult that evolved into a post-War doomsday cult. The Children preach a doctrine of “peace forged by war and hardship” and worship the Holy Flame that destroyed the world. The Children are based in the ruins of Las Angeles, living in the shells of skyscrapers. From here they send out conversion parties to gather new recruits and report back on the capabilities of military strength of a settlement. War parties are sent out to find heavy weapons and weapons of mass destruction in the ruins of military bases. The Children rarely engage in warfare, seeking to make alliances to gather their needs and goals. The New Era Mexican Order (NEMO) is an order of Mexican rebels that have banned together in the ruins of Phoenix to bring the southwest United States under their control. This is the largest raider and slaver group in the south-west wasteland. They prey on tribal villages and on caravans traveling between wasteland settlements. NEMO has a large amount of resources and can acquire items for those that are willing to pay. The Steel Disciples are the remnants of the shattered United States government. Before the Exodus, the United States government dedicated 13 fallout shelters to powerful individuals (people of wealth, intelligence, and military prowess) around the United States. The Steel Disciples fallout shelter consisted of military personal and scientist from the Manhattan Project (Alberta) located on the Nevada/Utah border at a military base in Wendover. When the Exodus eradicated man, some 600 Disciples survived in the shelter, but lost communication with the rest of the US Government when EMP nukes destroyed the communication satellites and landlines. After twenty years of surviving in the shelters, several key members of the Disciples transverse into the wasteland to begin to recruit survivors to rebuild the United States Military.

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San Francisco is not a safe place for non-Chinamen, since the emergence of the Chi Dynasty. The birth of the Chi-Dynasty began with a vision of the Chinese prophet, Wu Lung, and the retreat and upheaval of a fallout shelter located beneath Chinatown in San Francisco. When the fallout shelter doors opened twenty years later, the Dynamo emerged declaring to his vassals, to cleanse the Chinatown ruins of unwanted dangers and set up settlements on the borders of San Francisco. The Chi’s are not ruthless killers, but they’ve become xenophobic against non-Chi for causing the Exodus. The Chi has set up a trading post at the southern ends of their territory in ruins of a small city they call Barter Town for outsiders to enter to trade goods. The Savior’s Army is the remnants of a non-profit organization that originated in the 20th century. They once collected clothes for the poor and provided food and shelter. After the Exodus, the surviving Savior’s changed their goals and now run small clinics throughout the wasteland, providing medical attention to those in need. The Savior’s Army now collects medical supplies through donations (which is rare) and from bartering with explorers of the wasteland. There is a Savior’s Army bartering post and medical tent in nearly every civilized Wasteland settlement and a few outposts. The Techno-Reapers are a large cult that spread across the Wastelands, seeking to reap technology from forgotten locations and from the hands of individuals and organization that continue to bring the downfall of man. The Techno-Reapers believe that technology will restore earth to pre-Great War stasis and bring about the new age (a golden tech age) of man. The Techno-Reapers are a technophile cult based out of an old military research center in Alamogordo, New Mexico but have opened many splinter cells in large wasteland cities. Unlike typical cults the Techno-Reapers does not necessarily worship technology; although to an outsider it might appear so; rather, the Techno-Reapers take whatever means necessary to preserve it, study it, and improve it. The Tribal Nation is composed of Native American Tribes that took shelter in the underground caves of Grand Canyon in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah during the Exodus. During their extended stay in these caves, the next generation of Native Americans developed mutant abilities to control wild animals while dwelling in those radioactive caves. The Tribal Nation consists of four tribes that warred for several of years before coming to peaceful terms under an elected Grand Chief. With their war behind them, the Tribal Nation settled in the ruins surrounding the Grand Canyon at Big Water, Marble Canyon, Stammer, and Bullshead. These tribes recruit wasteland animals and patrol the canyon generally armed with primitive weapons and simple guns from intruders and threats. The Tribal Nation have set up small trading posts at the edges of their territory to trade goods with outsiders. They supply a large amount of feathers, leather, and meat jerky to the southeastern states.

Unity is a cult located at Lake Tahoe, based on the belief that the body and spirit are one and that all

souls are linked to Union by a degree of separation. Unity members are ranked into six degrees of separation from the Well of Souls (aka Lake Tahoe). Degrees are determined by communion with Unity and are bestowed by the Wake, the Unity leader that has transcended beyond the sixth degree. Unity recruiters and pilgrims can be found in the California and Nevada region seeking to find new recruits and passage to the Union.

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Reno Tahoe

Berkeley

San Francisco Barter Town

Vegas

Bull shea d

Los Angeles

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Wendover

Big Water Marble Canyon

egas

Supia

Los Alamos

Bullshead

Roswell

Phoenix Alamogordo

Los Cruces

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Arizona Bullshead is a small city that is settled on the Colorado River on what used to be the California/Arizona

border. The city is largely intact, due to the fallout hitting both to the north of Bullshead, around Vegas, and to the south at Lake Havasu. The radiation from the fallout killed the population of this area, but the savages that survived from the Mojave Reservation have taken residence in this city under the Beastmaster protection, making it the largest settlement of Tribal on the west coast. These Tribals are very territorial of their city, and kill any person with Slaver tattoos. They primarily fish the river and hunt their old reserve that is across the river, for food. They do not have a monetary trading system like many of the other Wasteland cities; they just trade for what they need to survive. Bullshead is governed by the Ghostdancer, a Beastmaster selected by the Big Chief of the Beastmaster Nation to lead these people.

Marble Canyon and Supai is settlements of the Beastmasters on the border of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Normally outsiders of the tribe are band from this region unless a special invitation has been granted by the Big Chief or a Ghost Dancer. Phoenix is the largest populated area in the southwest, due to the attraction of all of the surviving

riffraff. Bandits, lowlifes, and slavers mostly make their home here. The major attraction however is the organized raiders NEMO that control the area and keep the law. If you’re looking to hide from wasteland justice, or need just about anything illegal, Phoenix is the place.

California Berkeley is the largest settlement of Ghūls in California. They do not trust outsiders human since the Chi attempted to eliminate them in the 2032 uprising. They do trade services for goods at an old gas station on the outskirts of Berkeley.

Las Angles, the city of angels, is no more than gutted out steel skyscrapers skeletal hands that reach towards the heavens in testament of a civilization that once existed. This once large pre-war city of Los Angeles and the suburbs that surround now are rubble filled, making this the premium salvaging site for building materials, and a war zone as a result. The Children of the Apocalypse dominate the ruins of LA which they call the Junkyard. They allow salvaging parties to collect material in trade for firearms and ammunition. The Children have set up two large trading yards on the outskirts of the ruins (to the east and south) that contain already salvaged materials to sell or trade to Wasteland caravan merchants. They regularly trade with NEMO and the Vegas Mafia and have standing treaties with both parties. Representatives of both organizations can be found in the Junkyard trading yards. The Children have also set up a perimeter to the North to resist the Chi forces that raid the area for salvaged supplies.

Lake Tahoe is a small wasteland town built on the ruins of a resort. Here the followers of Unity have set up shop in restored lakeside mansion. Other merchants have set up on the outskirt of Lake Tahoe to buy unwanted items from Pilgrims going to the Union.

San Francisco is more of a region than a city. The entire San Francisco peninsula is

controlled by the Chi and regularly patrolled by armed Chi bowmen and swordsmen. Chinatown is the nexus of the Chi people, with four lords serving the Emperor controlling the southern domain of the Chi.

Barter Town is an old junkyard south of San Francisco with walls made of crushed cars piled

high. This is a fortified town, with a strict enforcement of Chi rules regarding Wasteland travelers entering. You can only enter during the day, and with no weapons at that; or try to sneak in a weapon and you’re either dead or in

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the box. Barter Town is a good layover to pickup supplies, recover from the dangers of the Wasteland, or engage in a game of chance at the boxing ring.

Nevada Reno is one of the largest cities in the Wasteland. The city is split into two sections, an inner city and outer city. To enter the inner city, you cannot brand arms, and are subject to a complete body search for illegal substances and items. Here, one can find mechanics, armament dealers, and fine eating establishments. Brandish a weapon in the inner city and you’ll soon find out what a makes Reno tick, the Reno Police, twelve Trans-Genetic Mutants. The outer city of Reno is where most of the trade of this region goes on. A tent town has been created around the outer walls to serve the many merchants that scavenge the Wasteland for booty to sell. A large bar, the only structure outside the walls, can be found in this area that serves as a stop to pick up a beer and a place for many rumors.

Vegas is a city run by drug cartels and mafia, with some unique attractions, such as: two casinos, the premier Wasteland boxing venue, a p*rn studio, and the Godiva brothel featuring the Cherry Bombs. If you’re looking for a good time, rare goods, drugs, slaves, or an easy woman, Vegas is the place to be. Beware of the mafia, as you may get press-ganged as a foot soldier in one of the families’ army or, even worse, sold as a slave should you get on the wrong side of a mafia family.

Wendover is old military town that was part of the Manhattan Project. The survivors of the Wendover

fallout shelter, now known as the Steel Disciples made this their main base of operations. There are nine outposts in the Wendover Territory that are overseen by the Disciples.

New Mexico Alamogordo is the base of the Techno-Reapers, the remnants of scientists and engineers of the past. They are base in the Alamogordo military base and operate a trading post at a old space museum.

Los Alamos is the home to most of the Trans-Genetics Mutants as it was their birthplace. This is a military installation, and is highly protected by the Tran-Gens. Visitors are not received unless invited to take place in a Trans-Gen experiment.

Las Cruces is the home to the Cruces Lizard breeding grounds. This is a hunting area for those brave enough to hunt these dangerous Lizards.

Roswell is a small abandoned town with a military installation that no one approaches. The town

is overrun with violent military robots that kill intruders on site. The positive note is that these robots seem programmed to stay within 5 miles of the military base.

Utah Big Water is a settlement of the Beastmasters on the border of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Normally outsiders of the tribe are band from this region unless a special invitation has been granted by the Big Chief or a Ghost Dancer.

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Appendix A: Optional Character Class (Custom) Rather than offering several classes that reflect the possible roles that characters can adopt, Exodus players use a fully customizable system to generate the characters’ base attributes. As the character progresses, he or she may gain certain specialized training or join one of many Wasteland organizations. These further specializations and affiliations are reflected in the various advanced classes, detailed in Chapter 6.

The Customizable Class The customizable class allows a player to build a character in any fashion or flavor for the Exodus World. This is presented with the core Base Attack Bonus, Saving Throws, Defense, Hit Die, and Skill Points that are found in the Core Classes from the d20 Core Modern Core Rulebook. There are a few simple steps to determine the progression of each of the mentioned attributes.  First choose a BAB progression  Second choose a Defensive progression  Third choose a Hit Die per Level progression  Finally choose a Save bonus progression Now that your character base attributes progression levels are set, total up your Option Values and consult the Skill values table below to determine your base Skill Points per Level progression.

Base Attack Bonus

Base Attack Bonus Options Class Level 1 2 1st +0 +0 2nd +1 +1 3rd +1 +2 4th +2 +3 5th +2 +3 6th +3 +4 7th +3 +5 8th +4 +6/+1 9th +4 +6/+1 10th +5 +7/+2 AKA Wimp Average Joe

3 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +10/+5 Hitman

This is the character’s base attack bonus and determines the base number of attacks he receives at a particular level. When a character gains a +6 BAB through one of the Base Attack Bonus options or an Advanced Class, he then gains a second attack starting at +1 (BAB +6/+1) which increases with each addition to the BAB (example BAB +7/+2). At +11 BAB (+11/+6/+1) and +16 BAB (+16/+11/+6/+1) the character gains a third and fourth attack with the same progression. Defense Options Class Level 0 1st +0 2nd +1 3rd +1 4th +1 5th +2 6th +2 7th +2 8th +3 9th +3 10th +3 AKA Kamikaze

1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 Average

2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 Dodger

Defense Bonus This is a character’s bonus to Defense. A character receives a dodge bonus based on character level that stacks with all other bonuses to his total Defense as noted on the Defense Option table. The character’s Dexterity modifier and equipment bonus also applies.

Hit Die

The die type used by Hit Die per Level characters to determine the 0 1 2 3 number of hit points gained D4 D6 D8 D10 per level. A player rolls one Sickly Weak Average Healthy die of the given type each time his or her character gains a new level. The character’s Constitution modifier is applied to the roll. Add the result to the character’s hit point total. Even if the result is 0 or lower, the character always gains at least 1 hit point. A 1st-level character gains maximum hit points rather than rolling (although the Constitution modifier is still applied). The character’s Constitution modifier is applied as a bonus to this amount at each level. At 1 st level characters receive the maximum possible hit points plus their Constitution modifier.

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Glutton Creeper Games Saving Throws A character has three saving throws (Fortitude, Reflex, and Will), each with different progressions options. The character chooses his save options according to the chart below, with each of the three saves designated by him as corresponding to one of the Save columns. Once the Save option is chosen, the character is stuck with the Save progression per level, even if taking levels of Advanced Classes and returning to the Custom Class. Saving Throw Options Level 0 1 2 (A) 2 (B) 3(A) 3(B) 1st +0 +0 +0 +0 +0 +1 +0 +1 +1 +0 +0 +2 +0 +1 +2 +1 +1 2nd +0 +0 +1 +0 +0 +2 +0 +2 +2 +0 +0 +3 +0 +2 +3 +2 +2 3rd +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +1 +2 +2 +1 +1 +3 +1 +2 +3 +2 +2 4th +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +1 +2 +2 +1 +1 +4 +1 +2 +4 +2 +2 5th +1 +1 +2 +1 +1 +3 +1 +3 +3 +1 +1 +4 +1 +3 +4 +3 +3 6th +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +2 +3 +3 +2 +2 +5 +2 +3 +5 +3 +3 7th +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +4 +2 +4 +4 +2 +2 +5 +2 +4 +5 +4 +4 8th +2 +2 +3 +2 +2 +4 +2 +4 +4 +2 +2 +6 +2 +4 +6 +4 +4 9th +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +3 +4 +4 +3 +3 +6 +3 +4 +6 +4 +4 10th +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +5 +3 +5 +5 +3 +3 +7 +3 +5 +7 +5 +5 AKA Bad Average Good Good Great Great Example: A character taking Option 2 takes for Save 1 (Fortitude), for Save 2 (Will), and for Save 3 (Reflex). is now fixed for the character as denoted in the choice of column pick per level.

Skills

Once the player chooses all of his options tally the total together, and consult the skill progression chart to determine the number of skill points the character attains.

Skill Point Progression per Level Option Value 1st Level Skill points 1 10 + INT x 4 2 9 + INT x 4 3 8 + INT x 4 4 7 + INT x 4 5 6 + INT x 4 6 5 + INT x 4 7 4 + INT x 4 8 3 + INT x 4 9 2 + INT x 4 10 1 + INT x 4 11 0 + INT x 4

+1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 This option

Skills points per level 1 10 + INT 9 + INT 8 + INT 7 + INT 6 + INT 5 + INT 4 + INT 3 + INT 2 + INT 1 + INT 0 + INT

After the progression is determined, the character then chooses three different skills at character creation, called “Tag Skills”, to become additional class skills. A Tag Skill allows a character to exceed the normal skill rank by +2 (skill rank limit becomes 1 In Exodus, it is possible for a character to gain no skill points at character creation or upon character level +5 instead of +3). The advancing a level if the character has a negative modifier to INT that put his skill points gained below 0. Plainly put, the character is too dumb to learn and maintain the Intelligence to Exodus Hero can never choose new Tag possess any non-physical skills. In this case the character instead gains ½ skill points per level Skills (unless provided from a (two skill-points at first level) and can only apply the ½ skill point to his class skills and the background or by taking the feat Tag!), following untrained skills: Climb, Intimidate, Hide, Jump, Listen, and Spot. Gifted applies to this rule and reduces the ½ skill point to ¼ skill points per level and 1 skill even if the Hero changes to an point at first level. advanced class (although advanced classes may confer new class skills). Should a character chose a skill that does not have ranks, such as Read/Write Language or Speak Language, the character instead gains one bonus language in that field. A character's Background or Occupation may provide him or her with additional class skills or starting skill points at creation. Skills are detailed in Chapter 2. In Exodus, it is possible for a character to gain no skill points at character creation or upon advancing a level if the character has a negative modifier to INT that put his skill points gained to or below 0. Plainly put, the character is too dumb to learn and maintain the Intelligence to possess any non-physical skills. In this case the character instead gains ½ skill points per level (two skill-points at first level) and can only apply the ½ skill point to his class skills and the following untrained skills: Climb, Intimidate, Hide, Jump, Listen, and Spot. Gifted applies to this rule and reduces the ½ skill point to ¼ skill points per level and 1 skill point at first level.

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294 Custom Class Starting Feats All characters start with feats at 1st level (though they must meet the prerequisites for them). These Feats may be chosen from this guidebook or other Exodus sourcebooks. Additionally all characters begin play with the Simple Weapons Proficiency feat in addition to any perks conferred by a Background or an Occupation.

Class Features

The following are class features of characters.

Bonus Feats

At 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th level characters receive a bonus feat that may be selected from this guidebook, or other Exodus sourcebooks.

Talents At 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th level an Exodus character selects a talent from the talent trees detailed in Section 6. As long as the character meets the prerequisites for the talent, he can select freely from any and all of talent trees. No talent can be selected more than once unless expressly indicated.

Karma Points

Karma Points are a pool of points that a character receives upon gaining a level. The point total equals 3 plus ½ character level (plus any other bonuses from a class feature or perk). Each time the character advances a level, his Karma Point pool refreshes to maximum points total as denoted above (the points gained do not add to the existing total, if any, but instead replaces the pool point total). Karma Points provide characters with the means to affect game play in significant ways. A character always has a limited amount of Karma, and while the character replenishes this supply with every new level he or she attains, the character must use them wisely. A character can spend 1 karma point to do one of these things: Alter a single d20 roll used to make an attack, a skill check, an ability check, a level check, or a saving throw. Use a class talent or class feature during your turn for which the expenditure of 1 action point is required. When a character spends 1 Karma Point to improve a d20 roll, add 1d6 to the d20 roll to help meet or exceed the target number. A character can declare the use of 1 action point to alter a d20 roll after the roll is made— but only before the Overseer reveals the result of that roll (whether the attack or check or saving throw succeeded or failed). A character cannot use a Karma Point on a skill check or ability check when he or she is taking 10 or taking 20. When a character spends 1 Karma Point to use a class feature, he or she gains the benefit of the feature but does not roll a d6. In this case, the Karma Point is not a bonus to a d20 roll. A character may only spend 1 Karma Point in a round. If a character spends a point to use a class feature, he or she cannot spend another one in the same round to improve a die roll, and vice versa.

Multi-class Rebuilds

A character can multi-class the Custom Class every level up to 10 levels of this class. Just rebuild the custom class as above and record the changes for each multi-class level for the Overseer to view. It works the same as the first build except keep a tracking sheet labeled Custom A, Custom B, and so forth.

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Appendix B Exodus Historic American Vintage produced 1960 and 1970 replica vehicles from 1996 until the Exodus. All of the replica vehicles were made with Detroit steel and contained state-of-the-art technology and included the addition of the fusion cell in 2002. They are known for vehicles such as the Cobra Impaler and Colt Switchblade.

Bushwhack Armaments was the leading firearm designers of the 21st century making several high powered weapons and experimental firearms and hand-to-hand weapons. Bushwhack produced the infamous stun club (great for getting a late night date) and several models of laser and plasma weapons.

Dynamic Motors produce vehicles from the early 1950’s until the Exodus. Most of the vehicles produce

used the classic land-boat body style. Dynamic Motors was known mostly for their Roadmaster series (I–IV) of vehicles.

Mr. Fusion International was the original company to produce the Fusion Cell. The Fusion Cell, once a

military contract, powered energy weapons, but later were converted to power household appliances and gadgets, power armor, and vehicles. With the expansion of the fusion-powered items, several no-name companies licensed the patent of the Fusion Cell, producing a mass of Fusion Cells between 2002 and 2012.

Rad-Tek was contracted by the United States government to educate the populous about atomic war and fallout. Rad-Tek replaced the Civil Defense government sponsored program during the Cold War in the 1960’s and produced several safety guides to surviving the fallout and life afterwards.

In the 1980’s Rad-Tek shifted to developing several drugs to combat the effects of Radiation. Most of these drugs were created for the military and was unavailable to the public until the War began in 2010. Two of their most popular drugs were Rad-Blocker 2, a glow in the dark pill that blocked harmful effects of radiation for a short time, and Radium X, a power drink that reduces the effects of radiated person.

RoboCore was a company based in Chicago that built small sentry robots for military and police forces for the United States and allied countries. While experimenting with the cyborg limb replacement program in the late 1990’s, the basis for the suit of Power Armor was achieved. With the unit perfected after several years of experimenting through a cyborg police program in Detroit, RoboCore began to mass produce Power Armor in 2002. Later the Japanese company, Mitsunami improved the Power Armor by adding a hardened crystallized chemical to the exterior shell.

Savage Arms was the premier hand-to-hand weapon maker in the late 20th century. They made all sort of

weapons, such as the Slugger’s Arm baseball bat, Big Pimpin brass knuckles, and Savage Viet Kong combat knifes. At the turn of the century Savage Arms, began to experiment with power weapons, and created the Bitchslap Power Fist and Cutter Plasma Knife.

Vector Junction produced several Plasma-based firearms in the late 2000’s for the US military. They also created several other military armaments based on Mr. Fusion engine schematics, such as the plasma cannon for black hawk copters, plasma gun turrets at military installations, and several prototype mech warriors.

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296 Jinxed Trait Table

Appendix C Jinxed Trait Jinxed Critical Failure Effect (Firearm) (d%) 01-20 21-40 41-50 51-60 61-70 71-80 81-90 91-95 96-100

Jinxed Critical Failure Effect (Thrown)

Firearms Firearm misfire (roll normal attack at random target within 60 feet of wielder) Drop Firearm (move action to pickup, provokes attack of opportunity from melee opponents) Firearm Jams (must spend a standard action to un-jam the firearm) Firearm Jams (ammunition chambered ruined and must spend a standard action to un-jam the firearm) Firearm Damaged (-4 to hit; Repair check DC 15 to fix) Firearm Breaks (unusable; Repair check DC 25 to fix) Firearm Explodes (normal hit on wielder; firearm and ammunition chambered destroyed) Firearm Explodes (x2 critical hit on wielder; firearm and ammunition loaded destroyed)) Firearm Explodes (x3 critical hit on wielder; firearm and ammunition loaded destroyed))

(d%) 01-25

26-45

46-65

66-80

81-90

91-95

96-100

Thrown Weapon Dropped (move action to pickup, provokes attack of opportunity from melee opponents) Miss-Throw (roll normal attack at random target in first range increment of the thrower). Explosive weapon explodes at target site all within range of the blast gains a +4 Reflex save. Damage Thrown Weapon (–4 to hit; Repair check DC 15 to fix) / Explosive Disabled (the explosive thrown weapon is disabled; Demolition check DC 20 to fix) Thrown Weapon Breaks (unusable; Repair check DC 25 to fix) / Explosive Thrown Weapon Trigger Breaks (unusable; the explosive thrown weapon trigger breaks; Demolition check DC 30 to fix) Hit self / Thrown Weapon Explodes (normal hit on wielder). Explosive weapon explodes at target site all within range of the blast except thrower gains a +4 Reflex save. Hit self / Thrown Weapon Explodes (x2 critical hit on wielder). Explosive weapon explodes at target site all within range of the blast except thrower gains a +4 Reflex save. Hit self / Thrown Weapon Explodes (x3 critical hit on wielder). Explosive weapon explodes at target site all within range of the blast except thrower gains a +4 Reflex save.

Jinxed Critical Failure Effect (Melee) (d%) 01-25 26-45 46-65 66-80 81-90 91-95 96-100

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Melee Weapon Weapon Dropped (move action to pickup, provokes attack of opportunity from melee opponents) Hit Adjacent Target (roll normal attack at random target adjacent of the wielder) Damage Weapon (-4 to hit; Repair check DC 15 to fix) Weapon Breaks (unusable; Repair check DC 25 to fix) Hit self (normal hit on wielder) Hit self (x2 critical hit on wielder) Hit self (x3 critical hit on wielder)

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298 Appendix D: Wasteland Advertisem*nts

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299

Glutton Creeper Games

Keeping neighborhoods SAFE since 2010.

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300 Appendix D: Wasteland Advertisem*nts

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Index

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A Ability Scores, 6 Age, 24 Aggressive Class, 21 Aid Another, 210 Ammunition, 135 Arizona, 288 Armed Unarmed Attacks, 199 Armor, 158 Attack, 192 Attack Bonus, 192 Attacks of Opportunity, 198, 204 Auto-fire, 210 Auto-Fire, 207 B Backgrounds, 15 Base Attack Bonus, 23, 293 Bounty Hunter, 234 Bull Rush, 213 Burst Fire, 207 C California, 289 Carrying Capacity, 130 Character Creation, 10 Charge, 201 Chemical Addiction, 229 Chemicals, 166 Chi Descendant, 15 Children of the Apocalypse, 286 Children of the Apocalyse, 16 City Slicker, 15 Class Skills, 21 Classes, 20 Combat, 192 Combination Longarms, 146 Concealment, 208 Coup de Grace, 208 Cover, 206 Critical Hits, 194 Cultist, 16 Currency, 131 Custom, 293

Dice, 6 Disarm, 214 Dreadnought, 239 E Energy Melee Weapons, 153 Energy Pistols, 149 Energy Rifles, 151 Environmental Dangers, 220 Equipment, 129 Exotic Weapons, 147 Explorer, 241 Explosives, 151, 211 F Fame, 49 Feats, 95 Feral Child, 16 Field Gear, 170 Field Medic, 243 Field Scientist, 244 Fighting Defensively, 198 Firearms, 210 Flanking, 206 Freed Slave, 17 Friendly Fire, 207 Full Attack, 202 Full-Round Actions, 201 G Gangster, 17 Ghuls, 12 Grapple, 215 Grenades, 151, 211 Gunslinger, 246 H Handguns, 137 Hardness, 212 Harvester, 248 Healing, 229 Heavy Weapons, 147 Helpless, 208 Hit Die, 20, 293 Hit Points, 195 Humans, 11

D

I

Damage, 193 Daredevil, 236 Defense, 194 Defense Bonus, 22, 293 Defensive Class, 21 Delay, 209 Desert Ranger, 237

Improvised Weapons, 156 Infamy, 49 Infiltrator, 249 Initiative, 196

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K Karma Points, 21, 295 Knockout Blow, 208 L Longarms, 140 M Made Man, 251 Manuals, 177 Martial Artist, 253 Massive Damage, 227 Master Trader, 255 Material Scarcity, 62 Medical Supplies, 165 Melee Weapons, 154 Move Actions, 201 Multi-class Characters, 22 Mutant Berserker, 257 Mutant Commando, 259 Mutant Defector, 17 N Nevada, 290 New Era Mexican Order (NEMO), 286 New Mexico, 291 Non-lethal Damage, 228 O Object, 212 Occupations, 28 Overrun, 218 P Prizefighter, 260 Projectile Weapons, 157 R Races, 11 Radiant One, 18 Radiation, 224 Range Penalty, 193 Ranged Attacks, 200 Ready, 209 Reloading Firearms, 135 Reputation, 49 Rigger, 262 Run, 203 S San Francisco, 287 Saving Throws, 21, 195, 294 Savior’s Army, 287

Savior's Army, 16 Scarcity, 132 Shelter Dweller, 18 Skills, 50, 294 Slayer, 264 Sniper, 265 Socialite, 267 Soldier, 269 Speed, 195 Steel Disciple Initiate, 270 Steel Disciple Knight, 272 Steel Disciple Scribe, 273 Steel Disciples, 286 Street Warrior, 275 Surprise, 197 Survivalist, 18 Swindler, 277 T Tag Skills, 21, 294 Talents, 22, 35 Targeted Attacks, 219 Techno-Reaper, 19 Techno-Reapers, 16, 287 Thrasher, 278 Thrown Weapons, 157 Total Defense, 200 Toxic Waste, 226 Traits, 25 Trans-Genetic Mutant, 13 Tribal, 19 Tribal Shaman, 280 Tribal Warrior, 282 Trip, 219 Two Weapons, 202 U Unarmed Attacks, 198 Unity, 16, 287 Urban Survivor, 19 Utah, 292 V Vehicle Combat, 182 Vehicle Repair, 191 Vehicles, 179 W Wanderer, 20 Wealth, 132 Weaponsmaster, 284 Withdraw, 203

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Index OPEN GAME LICENSE Version 1.0a The following text is the property of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and is Copyright 2000 Wizards of the Coast, Inc ("Wizards"). All Rights Reserved. 1. Definitions: (a)"Contributors" means the copyright and/or trademark owners who have contributed Open Game Content; (b)"Derivative Material" means copyrighted material including derivative works and translations (including into other computer languages), potation, modification, correction, addition, extension, upgrade, improvement, compilation, abridgment or other form in which an existing work may be recast, transformed or adapted; (c) "Distribute" means to reproduce, license, rent, lease, sell, broadcast, publicly display, transmit or otherwise distribute; (d)"Open Game Content" means the game mechanic and includes the methods, procedures, processes and routines to the extent such content does not embody the Product Identity and is an enhancement over the prior art and any additional content clearly identified as Open Game Content by the Contributor, and means any work covered by this License, including translations and derivative works under copyright law, but specifically excludes Product Identity. 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Termination: This License will terminate automatically if You fail to comply with all terms herein and fail to cure such breach within 30 days of becoming aware of the breach. All sublicenses shall survive the termination of this License. 14. Reformation: If any provision of this License is held to be unenforceable, such provision shall be reformed only to the extent necessary to make it enforceable. 15. COPYRIGHT NOTICE Open Game License v1.0a Copyright 2000, Wizards of the Coast, Inc. System Reference Document Copyright 2000-2003, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Rich Baker, Andy Collins, David Noonan, Rich Redman, Bruce R. Cordell, John D. Rateliff, Thomas Reid, James Wyatt, based on original material by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson. Modern System Reference Document Copyright 2002-2004, Wizards of the Coast, Inc.; Authors Bill Slavicsek, Jeff Grubb, Rich Redman, Charles Ryan, Eric Cagle, David Noonan, Stan!, Christopher Perkins, Rodney Thompson, and JD Wiker, based on material by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Richard Baker, Peter Adkison, Bruce R. Cordell, John Tynes, Andy Collins, and JD Wiker. Exodus (post-apocalyptic roleplaying), the Exodus Logo, Glutton Creeper Games, and Glutton Creeper Games Logo are Trademarks of Glutton Creeper Games. Exodus Survivor’s Guide (PDF) is copyright © 2007– 2009 Glutton Creeper Games. This product may not be photocopied or scanned after purchase without written consent from Glutton Creeper Games (except for the Exodus Character Sheets). "Warning: The unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this copyrighted work is illegal. 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Exodus Southwest Wasteland Guide The Southwest Wasteland Guide is a stand-alone OGL product to be used in conjunction with the Exodus Survivor's Guide. The Southwest Wasteland Guide expands the character build details presented in the Survivor's Guide, offering a new class template, feats, occupations, talents, and traits, as well as organizational-based Advanced Classes and new equipment. Additionally the organizations and settlements of the southwest United States briefly detailed in the Survivor's Guide are expanded greatly detailing the goals and leadership of each one.

Exodus Wasteland Bestiary The Wasteland Bestiary is a stand-alone OGL product to be used in conjunction with the Exodus d20 Survivor's Guide or Exodus OGL Survivor's Guide. The Bestiary details common animals and other wasteland terrors that survived the Exodus through adaptation, evolution, and mutation. A fully customizable creature build system (similar to the Custom Class) is built into the Bestiary along with an alternative EXPERIENCE combat system.

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